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Helicopter Accidents North Korea

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NEWS
December 30, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
North Korea today released an American helicopter pilot shot down 13 days ago, ending a crisis that threatened a fragile peace in one of the world's most dangerous corners. Chief Warrant Officer Bobby Hall, looking serious and tense, was escorted by North Korean army officers to the truce village of Panmunjom at 11:16 a.m. (6:16 p.m. Thursday PST). After a pause, he took a single step across the border into South Korea, saluted the U.S. military officer who received him, then shook his hand.
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NEWS
January 20, 1995 | DANA PRIEST, THE WASHINGTON POST
Army Chief Warrant Officer Bobby Hall, whose helicopter was shot down after it strayed over North Korea, is returning to his unit in South Korea next week and will resume flying, a likely indication that he is being cleared of negligence in the incident, Pentagon officials said Thursday. Although the final report on the matter is not yet complete, Pentagon spokesman Kenneth Bacon said: "Everything points to the fact this was a mistake of the type made from time to time. . . .
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NEWS
December 28, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The outgoing chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee said Tuesday that Congress will block a scheduled $5-million shipment of oil to North Korea if that country does not release a pilot whose helicopter was shot down after straying into North Korea on Dec. 17. The United States has said it would allow the oil shipment to occur under the terms of an agreement that requires North Korea to begin unraveling its nuclear weapons program, but Foreign Affairs Chairman Lee H. Hamilton (D-Ind.
NEWS
January 1, 1995 | From Associated Press
Army helicopter pilot Bobby Hall celebrated his first day of freedom Saturday in the quiet comfort of his family and hometown, planning to begin the new year without fanfare. "We have decided to spend some time with the family, say hello to all the people that were here and helped support my family, and tell them how much I appreciate it," Hall said. Hall, appearing tired and overwhelmed, spoke briefly with reporters the day after he returned from 13 days in captivity in North Korea.
NEWS
December 27, 1994 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to an opening from the Pyongyang regime, the Clinton Administration sent a high-ranking diplomat to North Korea on Monday to try to secure the release of a U.S. pilot downed there 10 days ago. Thomas Hubbard, deputy assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific affairs, left here Monday and is scheduled to cross the demilitarized zone into North Korea on Wednesday, officials here said.
NEWS
December 26, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Christmas Day came and went in North Korea with Chief Warrant Officer Bobby Hall still in captivity and the Clinton Administration seeking a high-level meeting today with North Korean military officers before deciding whether to increase American pressure to gain the downed aviator's freedom.
NEWS
December 25, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States has sent a letter to North Korea expressing regret for violating its airspace eight days ago when a U.S. Army helicopter mistakenly crossed into the Communist nation's territory and was shot down, U.S. officials here and in Washington said Saturday. Pentagon officials were optimistic that the letter would ease the way for North Korea to release the helicopter's surviving pilot, Chief Warrant Officer Bobby Hall. Pyongyang had demanded an apology, and U.S.
NEWS
January 1, 1995 | From Associated Press
Army helicopter pilot Bobby Hall celebrated his first day of freedom Saturday in the quiet comfort of his family and hometown, planning to begin the new year without fanfare. "We have decided to spend some time with the family, say hello to all the people that were here and helped support my family, and tell them how much I appreciate it," Hall said. Hall, appearing tired and overwhelmed, spoke briefly with reporters the day after he returned from 13 days in captivity in North Korea.
NEWS
December 29, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stalemate over a captured U.S. military helicopter pilot in North Korea took a new twist Wednesday as the Pyongyang government said that he has admitted making an "illegal intrusion" into the country. "I admit that this criminal action is inexcusable and unpardonable," pilot Bobby Hall was quoted as saying in a statement released by North Korea's official news agency. "However, at home, my parents, wife and kids are anxiously waiting for my return to them." U.S.
NEWS
January 20, 1995 | DANA PRIEST, THE WASHINGTON POST
Army Chief Warrant Officer Bobby Hall, whose helicopter was shot down after it strayed over North Korea, is returning to his unit in South Korea next week and will resume flying, a likely indication that he is being cleared of negligence in the incident, Pentagon officials said Thursday. Although the final report on the matter is not yet complete, Pentagon spokesman Kenneth Bacon said: "Everything points to the fact this was a mistake of the type made from time to time. . . .
NEWS
December 31, 1994 | MIKE CLARY and PAUL RICHTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two weeks after his U.S. Army helicopter dropped from the sky and into an international incident in North Korea, an emotional Bobby Hall flew home late Friday and offered his account of the Dec. 17 crash that led to his 13 days in captivity.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
North Korea today released an American helicopter pilot shot down 13 days ago, ending a crisis that threatened a fragile peace in one of the world's most dangerous corners. Chief Warrant Officer Bobby Hall, looking serious and tense, was escorted by North Korean army officers to the truce village of Panmunjom at 11:16 a.m. (6:16 p.m. Thursday PST). After a pause, he took a single step across the border into South Korea, saluted the U.S. military officer who received him, then shook his hand.
NEWS
December 29, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stalemate over a captured U.S. military helicopter pilot in North Korea took a new twist Wednesday as the Pyongyang government said that he has admitted making an "illegal intrusion" into the country. "I admit that this criminal action is inexcusable and unpardonable," pilot Bobby Hall was quoted as saying in a statement released by North Korea's official news agency. "However, at home, my parents, wife and kids are anxiously waiting for my return to them." U.S.
NEWS
December 28, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The outgoing chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee said Tuesday that Congress will block a scheduled $5-million shipment of oil to North Korea if that country does not release a pilot whose helicopter was shot down after straying into North Korea on Dec. 17. The United States has said it would allow the oil shipment to occur under the terms of an agreement that requires North Korea to begin unraveling its nuclear weapons program, but Foreign Affairs Chairman Lee H. Hamilton (D-Ind.
NEWS
December 27, 1994 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to an opening from the Pyongyang regime, the Clinton Administration sent a high-ranking diplomat to North Korea on Monday to try to secure the release of a U.S. pilot downed there 10 days ago. Thomas Hubbard, deputy assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific affairs, left here Monday and is scheduled to cross the demilitarized zone into North Korea on Wednesday, officials here said.
NEWS
December 26, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Christmas Day came and went in North Korea with Chief Warrant Officer Bobby Hall still in captivity and the Clinton Administration seeking a high-level meeting today with North Korean military officers before deciding whether to increase American pressure to gain the downed aviator's freedom.
NEWS
December 31, 1994 | MIKE CLARY and PAUL RICHTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two weeks after his U.S. Army helicopter dropped from the sky and into an international incident in North Korea, an emotional Bobby Hall flew home late Friday and offered his account of the Dec. 17 crash that led to his 13 days in captivity.
NEWS
December 25, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States has sent a letter to North Korea expressing regret for violating its airspace eight days ago when a U.S. Army helicopter mistakenly crossed into the Communist nation's territory and was shot down, U.S. officials here and in Washington said Saturday. Pentagon officials were optimistic that the letter would ease the way for North Korea to release the helicopter's surviving pilot, Chief Warrant Officer Bobby Hall. Pyongyang had demanded an apology, and U.S.
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