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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores and Don Bartletti
A portion of the roof of a World War II-era blimp hangar in Tustin collapsed early Monday, damaging a $35-million experimental zeppelin and triggering a helium leak. Employees at the hangar were evacuated and a hazardous material teams was working to contain the leak, Orange County Fire Authority Capt. Steve Concialdi said. "We had a collapse of a large section and it fell onto a blimp that caused damage," Concialdi said. He said the incident was reported at 7:45 a.m. The extent of the damage was unknown and the cause has not been determined,  Concialdi said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2014 | By Christy Khoshaba
“Helium,” the story of a terminally ill boy who is bored with the idea of heaven until he meets a janitor who concocts an alternative blimp-laden version of the afterlife, won the Oscar for live-action short film Sunday night.  The fanciful Danish charmer stars Casper Crump as the kindhearted janitor and Pelle Falk Krusbaek as the boy with a fascination for hot-air balloons. Clocking in at less than 23 minutes, the comforting tale effortlessly blends computer-generated images with live-action, a feat not easy to achieve, particularly with the budget of a short.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2008 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Edwin E. Salpeter, 83, an astrophysicist whose work in the "Salpeter-Bethe equation" showed how helium changes to carbon, died of leukemia Tuesday at his home in Ithaca, N.Y., according to Cornell University, where he had been a professor emeritus of physical sciences. Salpeter attended Cornell in 1949 as a postdoctoral student and spent his career there. In 1951, he and Cornell theoretical physicist Hans Bethe, winner of the 1967 Nobel Prize in physics, introduced an equation showing how helium nuclei fuse to form carbon in the interiors of ancient stars.
SCIENCE
February 19, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Talk about passing gas: Vast stores of helium are escaping from the steam vents and hot springs of Yellowstone National Park after being trapped within Earth's crust for up to 2 billion years, according to new research. In a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature, researchers with the U.S. Geological Survey determined that the famed national park was releasing hundreds -- if not thousands -- of times more helium than anticipated. In fact, researchers say, the escaping helium -- about 60 tons per year --  is enough to fill one Goodyear blimp every week.
SCIENCE
March 23, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
It's raining on Jupiter. And probably on Saturn too. But it isn't raining rain, you know. It's raining . . . helium. Yes, droplets of that inert gas that keeps the Goodyear blimp aloft and that powers the runaway house in the movie "Up" are falling like a soft rain from the upper atmosphere of the planet into the gas giant's high-pressure interior. In the process, they're washing away the neon that should also be in the upper atmosphere, researchers from UC Berkeley reported Monday in the online version of the journal Physical Review Letters.
SCIENCE
February 19, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Talk about passing gas: Vast stores of helium are escaping from the steam vents and hot springs of Yellowstone National Park after being trapped within Earth's crust for up to 2 billion years, according to new research. In a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature, researchers with the U.S. Geological Survey determined that the famed national park was releasing hundreds -- if not thousands -- of times more helium than anticipated. In fact, researchers say, the escaping helium -- about 60 tons per year --  is enough to fill one Goodyear blimp every week.
NEWS
October 1, 1996 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is like a giant gas bubble that won't burst. And for years, it has given Rep. Christopher Cox (R-Newport Beach) a lot of heartburn. But Cox may finally have succeeded in breaking up this bubble: the 31-billion-cubic-foot National Helium Reserve in Amarillo, Tex. Just before Congress scooted out of town Monday, the House and Senate voted again to get the federal government out of the hot air business--a reserve that is $1.4 billion in debt to the federal treasury.
SCIENCE
November 30, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
The Grand Canyon may be much older than widely believed, according to a new study that challenges the view that the American landmark was born 5 million or 6 million years ago. Analyzing helium levels in rocks chipped away from outcrops in the western portion of the canyon, geologist Rebecca Flowers of the University of Colorado at Boulder and geochemist Kenneth Farley of Caltech concluded that the gorge was already there - and within a few hundred...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The 15 short films nominated for Oscars each year, five in each category - live action, animation and documentary - usually feel completely untethered to their longer siblings. But this year, the shorts, like the longs, are a serious, substantial bunch, with a great many international contenders among them. Oh, a little cheek slips in here and there. In "Get a Horse," director Lauren MacMullan takes a satirical swipe at the animation form itself by waging a 3-D-versus-2-D, color-versus-black-and-white debate with a little help from Mickey Mouse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1989
The recent dramatic announcement at a press conference in Salt Lake City, that nuclear fusion had been achieved at room temperature, seems to have produced a state of hysteria that interfers with normal scientific communication. Concerning the Utah experiments: If one accepts that heat is generated and that neutrons appear in far too few numbers to account for that heat, one is led to consider reactions in which the two deuterons form Helium-4, rather than Helium-3 and a neutron.
SCIENCE
February 12, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Scientists have been trying to harness the secrets of star power since the days of the Cold War. Now, using a 2-millimeter capsule housed in a cavernous building roughly the length of three football fields, researchers have conducted a landmark experiment, using lasers to create the merest hint of controlled nuclear fusion that produced more energy than was put into the fuel alone. “This is really an important milestone,” said UCLA plasma physicist Warren Mori, who was not involved in the work.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The 15 short films nominated for Oscars each year, five in each category - live action, animation and documentary - usually feel completely untethered to their longer siblings. But this year, the shorts, like the longs, are a serious, substantial bunch, with a great many international contenders among them. Oh, a little cheek slips in here and there. In "Get a Horse," director Lauren MacMullan takes a satirical swipe at the animation form itself by waging a 3-D-versus-2-D, color-versus-black-and-white debate with a little help from Mickey Mouse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores and Don Bartletti
A portion of the roof of a World War II-era blimp hangar in Tustin collapsed early Monday, damaging a $35-million experimental zeppelin and triggering a helium leak. Employees at the hangar were evacuated and a hazardous material teams was working to contain the leak, Orange County Fire Authority Capt. Steve Concialdi said. "We had a collapse of a large section and it fell onto a blimp that caused damage," Concialdi said. He said the incident was reported at 7:45 a.m. The extent of the damage was unknown and the cause has not been determined,  Concialdi said.
SCIENCE
November 30, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
The Grand Canyon may be much older than widely believed, according to a new study that challenges the view that the American landmark was born 5 million or 6 million years ago. Analyzing helium levels in rocks chipped away from outcrops in the western portion of the canyon, geologist Rebecca Flowers of the University of Colorado at Boulder and geochemist Kenneth Farley of Caltech concluded that the gorge was already there - and within a few hundred...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2011 | By Richard Marosi, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from San Diego -- A former schoolteacher who sold suicide kits that she once touted as leaving people "eternally sleepy" pleaded guilty Friday to a tax evasion charge and agreed to stop encouraging people to commit suicide. Sharlotte Hydorn mailed more than 1,300 of the so-called helium hood suicide kits to people around the world, concealing the true nature of the product by describing the boxes as "orchid humidifiers" or "beauty bonnets" or "plastic rain hoods" on U.S. customs forms, according to federal prosecutors.
SCIENCE
November 11, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
For the first time, astronomers have discovered clouds of pristine gas in the distant universe about 12 billion light-years away. The finding offers a peek at what primordial gas looked like just a few minutes after the big bang, before heavier elements formed — a time when star formation was very different than it is today. The gas clouds, which appear — surprisingly — to have survived for about 2 billion years after the big bang almost 14 billion years ago, were discovered through looking at the light from distant quasars, some of the brightest objects in the universe.
OPINION
February 9, 1986
The article by Heppenheimer (Jan. 29), "It Is Time to Call the Shuttle Obsolete," is misleading. In his analogy of the explosion of the Challenger and that of the dirigible Hindenburg, the author states that the Hindenburg disaster "exposed the flaws in the dirigible as a passenger carrier." This is not entirely true. The Hindenburg explosion was caused by the fact that the dirigible was filled with highly explosive hydrogen rather than inert helium. This unfortunate situation was because the only source of helium in 1937 was the United States and, for various reasons, we refused to sell it to the Germans.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
As the race to produce fusion in a flask heated up around the world Tuesday, Stanford University revealed experiments that indicate nuclear fusion, and not some kind of chemical reaction, is the most likely explanation for heat generated by a table-top apparatus at the University of Utah. The Stanford announcement came on the heels of discovery of helium-4 in the Utah experiment, a discovery that fits perfectly with a growing number of theories that explain why it might be possible to achieve fusion at room temperature with a simple experiment.
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By Jason La, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
April Fools' has been a busy "news" day for the airline industry. In the name of fun, many carriers worldwide are announcing groundbreaking innovations aimed at improving the passenger experience, cutting costs and even defying the laws of physics. Earlier, I wrote about Ryanair's move to offer child-free flights . Here's a roundup of more April Fools' airline news/gags: -- In a post on its blog, Southwest announced that its team of scientists (the kind who study time travel, not the kind who build planes)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Astronomer Leonard Searle, a former director of the Carnegie Observatories whose observations provided crucial information in determining the conditions of the Big Bang that created the universe and helped explain how heavy elements are produced in stars, has died. He was 79. Searle died July 2 at his home in Pasadena, according to the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington, D.C. No cause of death was released. Searle also played a crucial role in the construction of the twin 6.5-meter (255-inch)
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