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Hells Canyon National Recreation Area

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NEWS
June 10, 1993 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The trouble with "saving" the great scenic places of America is that, like saving money or saving your breath, some things are hard to keep saved. For instance there is Hells Canyon, the steep, grandiose rock gorge cut by the Snake River through the Wallowa and Seven Devils mountain ranges, delineating the border of Idaho and northern Oregon. It is America's deepest canyon, more than 8,000 feet from its highest pine-and-peak edges down to the cactus-and-brush river bottom below.
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NEWS
June 10, 1993 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The trouble with "saving" the great scenic places of America is that, like saving money or saving your breath, some things are hard to keep saved. For instance there is Hells Canyon, the steep, grandiose rock gorge cut by the Snake River through the Wallowa and Seven Devils mountain ranges, delineating the border of Idaho and northern Oregon. It is America's deepest canyon, more than 8,000 feet from its highest pine-and-peak edges down to the cactus-and-brush river bottom below.
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NEWS
August 10, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Firefighters were gaining ground against several large blazes burning in the West, officials said. The National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho, reported firefighters had made good progress in combating several of 11 large fires that have burned more than 210,000 acres in California, Arizona, Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, Montana and Oregon. The largest fire, a 135,000-acre blaze in central Utah, has been half contained, said fire information officer Jim Lane.
TRAVEL
July 23, 2000 | KARIN ESTERHAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Banning Residence Museum is sponsoring a trip to explore historic Sacramento and the Mother Lode Country from Sept. 26 to Oct. 1. In Sacramento the group will visit the California State Railroad Museum, Sutter's Fort, the California State Indian Museum, the State Capitol Building and the Crocker Art Museum. A highlight will be an evening spent at the recently restored historic governor's mansion.
TRAVEL
July 8, 1990 | JAMES T. YENCKEL, WASHINGTON POST
Almost by chance last summer, I stumbled on a vast and almost empty mountainscape in central Idaho called the Sawtooth National Recreation Area. A curious name, I thought, and I was almost as intrigued by it as by the scenic beauty around me. The "Sawtooth" part I understood. In front of my eyes rose a long ridge of high, jagged peaks looking like the teeth of a saw. What puzzled me was the designation "national recreation area." What did it mean?
NEWS
June 14, 1997 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Horace Axtell always cries when the spring rain clouds stack up on the ridges and thunder rumbles down the Wallowa Valley. He figures it is a genetic weeping. His grandmother, who fled the valley with Chief Joseph and his band 120 years ago, always cried with the thunder. She said she was lonesome for the land. But Axtell thinks maybe she was remembering Joseph, the man they called Thunder Rolling From the Mountains.
TRAVEL
June 23, 1991 | RICHARD A. LOVETT, Lovett is a free-lancer living in Portland, Ore., who writes frequently on environmental and outdoor topics. He is a former law professor
In 1872, when Congress set aside Yellowstone as the world's first national park, it did so with surprisingly little debate. The idea seemed to be simply that such a marvelous place should not be allowed to fall into private hands. From that meager beginning, the number of national parks has grown to include many of the continent's special places: Yosemite, Yellowstone, the Grand Canyon, the Everglades, Denali (Mt. McKinley)--50 parks in all.
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