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NEWS
December 11, 2011
Crave the cold? KLM has a round-trip fare from LAX to Helsinki, Finland, for $793, including all taxes and fees. It is for travel Mondays through Thursdays between Jan. 16 and March 31; you must stay a Saturday night, and it is, of course, subject to availability. Info: KLM , (800) 225-2525 Source: Airfarewatchdog.com
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BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Order a club sandwich from hotel room service in Denver and you will spend an average of nearly $12. Order that same sandwich in Los Angeles and you will be out about $17. That was one of the findings in a study by the travel website TripAdvisor, in an attempt to find out which cities have the highest costs for in-room hotel extras. To conduct the study, the website collected prices for a club sandwich, the dry cleaning of one shirt and several mini-bar accessories from hotels in 62 cities, including 15 in the U.S. Las Vegas was found to have the priciest in-room amenities, at an average of $68. Denver was the least expensive at $41. Los Angeles ranked the fourth most expensive city at nearly $61. The most expensive international city was Helsinki, Finland, where the average hotel amenities bill came to nearly $89 - that includes $20 to dry clean a shirt and a whopping $38 for a club sandwich.
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NEWS
December 31, 1987 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Stockmann's, the biggest department store in Helsinki, is known in Moscow--to those who can afford it--as Moscow's best. For diplomats, journalists and others in Moscow with hard currency to spend, Stockmann's is a direct link to the capitalist world of things not available in the Communist state. Every evening, the "Tolstoy Express" rolls out of the Helsinki railroad station, with an attached baggage car full of goodies, on the overnight run to Moscow. In Moscow, the customers wait expectantly.
NEWS
December 11, 2011
Crave the cold? KLM has a round-trip fare from LAX to Helsinki, Finland, for $793, including all taxes and fees. It is for travel Mondays through Thursdays between Jan. 16 and March 31; you must stay a Saturday night, and it is, of course, subject to availability. Info: KLM , (800) 225-2525 Source: Airfarewatchdog.com
SPORTS
June 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
John Doherty of Ireland ran the year's fastest time at 5,000 meters Wednesday night, being timed in 13 minutes 15.28 seconds, at an IAAF Mobil Grand Prix track and field meet. Doherty missed his personal best of 13:15.09, set last year. Olympic 10,000-meter champion Brahim Boutayeb of Morocco was in contention in the 5,000, but dropped out after 3,000 meters, claiming injury. Steve Plasencia of the United States finished a distant second in 13:24.56.
TRAVEL
July 25, 1999
Thank you for the excellent article about Helsinki ("High Season for Helsinki," June 27). Finland is too seldom remembered as one of the most clean, beautiful, peaceful and interesting destinations. I would like to add that the Finnish city of Tampere hosts an annual theater festival--Aug. 10 to 15 this year. It is a real "happening" with street theater, outdoor concerts, open-air dancing and poetry readings. For information, contact the Tampere International Theater Festival; telephone 011-358-3-223-1066, fax 011-358-3-223-0121.
NEWS
May 27, 1986 | From Reuters
A Tass press agency reporter has defected with his wife and two children while on assignment in Finland by crossing into neighboring Sweden, emigre sources said today. The sources said Raivo Ojasaar, 39, an Estonian who had been posted in Helsinki since 1981, may have continued to West Germany or the United States to seek asylum.
SPORTS
October 3, 2011 | By Lisa Dillman
It was the era of big hair, big scoring and bigger dreams. Even in the age of no limits, a winsome 20-something hockey player from Finland with speed and touch was putting his NHL career on the time clock. Rookie Teemu Selanne was having dinner with two Winnipeg Jets teammates, forward Thomas Steen and defenseman Fredrik Olausson, and told them of his plans to return to play in Europe. They were properly dubious. "I told them two, three years and then I go back," Selanne, now 41 and entering the seventh season of his second stint with the Ducks, said the other day in Anaheim.
SPORTS
December 14, 2001 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bad news for King defenseman Jere Karalahti on Thursday was that he had not been selected to play for Finland in the Salt Lake City Olympics. The good news was that the Finns' decision not to include Karalahti on their 23-man Olympic roster had nothing to do with his past drug abuse. "No, no, no, no, no," Hannu Aravirta, coach of the Finnish national team, said from Helsinki when asked if Karalahti's history, including a 1997 conviction in Finland on drug offenses, had kept him off the team.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | JAMES JELTER, Reuters
In a quiet bay off Helsinki's bustling harbor, Finland's icebreakers loom large and ungainly, basking in the long Nordic summer light as if on a well-deserved holiday after months of fighting bitter Arctic cold. "Icebreakers are an economic must for Finland. We are the only nation in the world where all our ports freeze over in the winter," said Harri Soininen, vice president of the Wartsila Arctic Research Center.
SPORTS
October 7, 2011 | By Lisa Dillman
The celebratory homecoming for one Finn could not have gone better or more smoothly. Not only did he score a goal but his team emerged with a one-sided victory in its NHL opener Friday in Helsinki, Finland. It was Ville Leino and the Buffalo Sabres doing the scoring and the winning, not national hero Teemu Selanne and the Ducks. Buffalo, behind three power-play goals, defeated the Ducks, 4-1, at Hartwall Arena. Thomas Vanek led the Sabres with two goals and an assist. This was the arena with a big mural on the outside of Selanne, the favorite son of Finland, who, at age 41, was returning home to play an NHL regular-season game for the first time.
SPORTS
October 3, 2011 | By Lisa Dillman
It was the era of big hair, big scoring and bigger dreams. Even in the age of no limits, a winsome 20-something hockey player from Finland with speed and touch was putting his NHL career on the time clock. Rookie Teemu Selanne was having dinner with two Winnipeg Jets teammates, forward Thomas Steen and defenseman Fredrik Olausson, and told them of his plans to return to play in Europe. They were properly dubious. "I told them two, three years and then I go back," Selanne, now 41 and entering the seventh season of his second stint with the Ducks, said the other day in Anaheim.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2011 | By Mike Kupper, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Ollie Matson, a remarkably versatile football player who had the misfortune during a 14-year career in the National Football League to play on mostly bad teams, among them some of the worst Los Angeles Rams clubs in history ? and made it to the Hall of Fame anyway ? has died. He was 80. FOR THE RECORD: Ollie Matson: In the obituary of Hall of Fame football player Ollie Matson in the Feb. 20 LATExtra section, the last name of his former college teammate Bob St. Clair was misspelled as St. Claire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Molecular biologist Britton Chance , who combined an expertise in electronics and automation with a knowledge of physiology to pioneer the study of ultra-fast reactions in human biology, died of heart failure Nov. 16 at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. He was 97. An accomplished sailor who won a gold medal in yachting at the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki , Chance was a protean researcher who worked on radar systems during World War II, developed optical imaging techniques for studying fast biochemical reactions and proved key biochemical concepts about enzymatic reactions.
WORLD
November 10, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
Two of Russia 's most prominent human rights organizations say their work has been thrown into jeopardy by municipal efforts to evict them from their offices. For Human Rights and the Moscow Helsinki Group say they will fight to remain in their respective downtown offices. Both groups have occupied the same spaces for more than a decade at cut-rate rents brokered in a burst of liberalism following the collapse of the Soviet Union. The threat of eviction looms at a time when a dwindling community of human rights workers, locked in perpetual battle over grievances ranging from state violence in the restive Caucasus region to dismal conditions in Russian prisons, say they face increasing pressure and harassment.
TRAVEL
February 24, 2008 | Andrew Bender, Special to The Times
"I'd prefer to face indoors," I said to my friends Christopher and Dirk, who had taken me out for dinner on my first night in Finland's capital last October. We were about to be seated at Lasipalatsi, the "glass palace" restaurant.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | MATTI HUUHTANEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Road builders are connecting Arctic Finland and Central Europe with a highway that eventually may stretch 2,500 miles from Murmansk to Turkey. Finnish companies will repair, and occasionally widen, the existing road through Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. They will construct access ramps, install signs and build Western-style gas stations along the 625-mile route.
NEWS
January 19, 1987 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
The frozen Baltic and the icy cold of Finland have not chilled the bones of U.S. Ambassador to Finland Rockwell Schnabel and his wife, Marna, this past year. On holiday, they opted for skiing at Aspen between Christmas and New Year's. They were guests of their friend, Teddy Forstmann, whose firm just bought Lear Siegler Inc.
SPORTS
August 14, 2005 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
Lauryn Williams won her second gold medal at the world championships by anchoring the U.S. women's 400-meter relay team to a world-leading time and Dwight Phillips won his second successive long jump title on his first leap Saturday, giving U.S. athletes 24 medals and one day to match the team-record haul of 26, set in 1991.
OPINION
June 5, 2005 | W. Norton Grubb, W. Norton Grubb is the David Gardner Chair in Higher Education at UC Berkeley and author of "The Education Gospel: The Economic Value of Schooling."
One of the many complaints about schooling is that we are failing to prepare students for the technical demands of the global economy. We import computer specialists from India, outsource our engineering and fear China and its competitive education system. Meanwhile, the U.S. ranks about average on math and science tests administered to 15-year-olds in 41 countries by the Program for International Student Assessment, or PISA. Our literacy scores are also average, and highly unequal.
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