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Helsinki Formula

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BUSINESS
February 13, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Consumers will get 80% of the assets owned by a man whose Los Angeles-based company made $100 million selling a supposed baldness cure known as the "Helsinki Formula," federal officials said Wednesday. Under a settlement announced by the Federal Trade Commission, consumers will get the bulk of the money from Bankruptcy Court proceedings involving former Pantron I Corp. owner Hal Z. Lederman.
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BUSINESS
February 13, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Consumers will get 80% of the assets owned by a man whose Los Angeles-based company made $100 million selling a supposed baldness cure known as the "Helsinki Formula," federal officials said Wednesday. Under a settlement announced by the Federal Trade Commission, consumers will get the bulk of the money from Bankruptcy Court proceedings involving former Pantron I Corp. owner Hal Z. Lederman.
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MAGAZINE
November 10, 1991 | Mark Stuart Gill, Mark Stuart Gill is a writer living in Los Angeles. His last article for this magazine was "Losing It in Fat City."
THE MOUSE FORMULA The threat was delivered to Hal Z. Lederman's attorney: "Inform your client that if he continues to steal the formula, I'm not just going to sue, I'm going to take drastic action." It came from one Robert Murphy. Lederman, the marketing mastermind behind a hair-growth product called the Helsinki Formula, didn't let it bother him. He had been getting the same message for months.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1989 | From United Press International
FTC Tries to Cut Short Hair Growth Business: Dr. Ilona Purola, a Finnish physician, testified in federal court in Los Angeles Thursday on behalf of Los Angeles-based Pantron I Corp., the defendant in a suit by the Federal Trade Commission. The FTC charges that Pantron made false claims about the effectiveness of its Helsinki Formula product, which is advertised as being able to stop excessive hair loss and stimulate new hair growth. The court trial is expected to be completed Tuesday, Nov. 21.
SPORTS
February 2, 1988 | Gordon Edes
They may never get to the point where they shake hands on a basketball court again, but Laker center Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Denver forward Alex English have settled their legal differences out of court. You may recall that last season, English, the captain of the Nuggets, and Abdul-Jabbar, captain of the Lakers, slapped lawsuits on each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1993 | DIANE WERTS, NEWSDAY
He's just making a quick stop in New York City--two days-- because he's sailing next week for a month's tour of Europe, then heading up to Nantucket. At least he's here long enough to lunch at the Russian Tea Room, where he nods hello to fellow note-worthies as he regales his booth companions with tales of past and present adventures. His intercontinental travels from Yugoslavia to Peru. His activism in the '60s when he led anti-war efforts.
NEWS
April 25, 1995 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday rejected Dr. Jack Kevorkian's claim that the Constitution permits doctor-assisted suicides, opening the way for Kevorkian's prosecution on as many as 10 counts of murder for helping terminally ill patients end their lives. The retired Michigan pathologist, popularly known as "Dr. Death," had been charged with murder in the deaths of two patients and with assisting the suicide of three others.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1990 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Television is a huckster and viewers are its targets. From news programs that promote themselves and their network's entertainment programs to talk-show guests pitching books and movies. From children's programs tied to commercial products to electronic preachers who buy time on stations to sell their brand of religion and morality.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | RICHARD SANDOMIR, Sandomir is a free-lance writer and author of the coming book, "Bald Like Me."
"C'mon, bring your bald head over here," roars John T. Capps III as I enter the Holiday Inn. With six other baldies, I face the lobby's wall-size mirror as we pose for a Philadelphia TV station. Between our heads and the lights, there's plenty of glare. Capps exhorts us to rub our domes in unison and chant: "Hip-hip! Bald is beautiful! Bald is beautiful! Bald is beautiful!" As Capps choreographs our movements, he takes phone calls from the news media.
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