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Helsinki Watch Committee

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NEWS
November 12, 1988 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
Andrei D. Sakharov, the Nobel laureate and noted human rights activist, said here Friday that Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev is moving to centralize power in his country to such an extent that "it is tantamount to a coup." The thermonuclear physicist, making his first visit to the United States, said he believes that Gorbachev is seizing power "out of good intentions," but added, "I still consider it a serious problem. "I think it is a dangerous new development.
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NEWS
January 28, 1992 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nermin Alkan was 16 years old when, moved by the gathering Persian Gulf War clouds over Turkey's southeastern border with Iraq, she hung up a poster in her classroom saying "No to This Unjust War." The gesture was fated to teach her much about injustice. The school principal denounced her to the local police. They took her to the Istanbul security headquarters.
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NEWS
September 13, 1991 | From Associated Press
Over the past 10 years, conditions in Soviet prisons have improved while those in the United States have gotten worse, the U.S. Helsinki Watch Committee said Thursday after lengthy surveys of superpower jails. Both countries still have the highest incarceration rates among major nations of the world, with 1 million people each behind bars, Helsinki Watch said in reports published to coincide with a 38-nation human rights conference being held in Moscow.
NEWS
September 13, 1991 | From Associated Press
Over the past 10 years, conditions in Soviet prisons have improved while those in the United States have gotten worse, the U.S. Helsinki Watch Committee said Thursday after lengthy surveys of superpower jails. Both countries still have the highest incarceration rates among major nations of the world, with 1 million people each behind bars, Helsinki Watch said in reports published to coincide with a 38-nation human rights conference being held in Moscow.
NEWS
January 28, 1992 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nermin Alkan was 16 years old when, moved by the gathering Persian Gulf War clouds over Turkey's southeastern border with Iraq, she hung up a poster in her classroom saying "No to This Unjust War." The gesture was fated to teach her much about injustice. The school principal denounced her to the local police. They took her to the Istanbul security headquarters.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | Reuters
Bulgarian dissidents, struggling under one of Eastern Europe's most orthodox Communist governments, formed a group Wednesday to monitor human rights. Activist Anton Zapryanov said he and 11 others had founded the Helsinki Watch committee to check Bulgaria's compliance with the human rights provisions of the 1975 Helsinki Declaration on Security and Cooperation in Europe. Similar committees exist in Western European countries as well as in Czechoslovakia and Hungary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1985
Soviet officials have again betrayed their fear of ideas, free expression and open exchange, and have again violated their commitment to those very elements of the Final Act of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe signed in Helsinki 10 years ago. The latest evidence of the Soviet Union's defiance of the Helsinki accords came in the denial of visas for two Americans who had been planning to attend the Moscow Book Fair next week.
NEWS
May 13, 1986 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
In a bittersweet and dramatic reunion after almost a decade, Soviet dissidents Anatoly Shcharansky and Yelena Bonner hugged and shared memories at simple ceremonies Monday commemorating the Moscow Helsinki Watch Committee that they helped start. The committee, which monitored human rights violations in the Soviet Union, was broken up by Soviet authorities six years after its beginning, and all of its founding members were arrested.
OPINION
February 19, 1989
The seeds of perestroika were sown in the Prague spring. It was there, 21 years ago, that the socialism of the East first showed the world its human face. On Tuesday the government of Czechoslovakia will put playwright Vaclav Havel on trial for the crime of remembering that fact.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1986
Considering the cruelties that are heaped on Soviet citizens who want to leave their homeland, skepticism about a supposedly more liberal Soviet emigration law was inevitable. Publication of the new guidelines, however, does come against an interesting background of movement in the Kremlin's declared approach to civil-liberties questions --if not in the policies themselves.
NEWS
November 12, 1988 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
Andrei D. Sakharov, the Nobel laureate and noted human rights activist, said here Friday that Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev is moving to centralize power in his country to such an extent that "it is tantamount to a coup." The thermonuclear physicist, making his first visit to the United States, said he believes that Gorbachev is seizing power "out of good intentions," but added, "I still consider it a serious problem. "I think it is a dangerous new development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1987
By pre-Gorbachev standards, Soviet authorities showed admirable restraint on Sunday in allowing demonstrators in the three Baltic republics to mount protests against Soviet rule. However, the later arrest of some protest leaders, plus the angry reaction of the controlled Soviet press, illustrates that official tolerance for nationalistic agitation is less than skin deep. Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia were independent nations between World Wars I and II. But on Aug.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | From Reuters
Soviet human rights champion Andrei Sakharov said on Friday that Mikhail S. Gorbachev is concentrating governmental powers in his hands to such an extent that it is "tantamount to a coup" with good intentions. He called it a dangerous development but also urged the West to support Gorbachev's perestroika (restructuring) policies because the alternative would be an expansionist Soviet Union that "would constitute a threat to the rest of the world."
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