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Helter Skelter

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2003 | From a Times staff writer
"Helter Skelter," Vincent Bugliosi's book about the Manson family killings of the 1960s, is going to be made into a TV movie by CBS for a second time, the Hollywood Reporter says. The trade paper reported Monday that CBS has given its OK to a three-hour adaptation by John Gray that focuses on Charles Manson and how he persuaded his followers to commit the 1969 Tate-LaBianca murders of which they were convicted by prosecutor Bugliosi.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Early in Jeff Guinn's "Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Manson," the first full biography of the infamous mass killer, there's a moment of unexpected and discomforting empathy. It's 1939, and Manson - 5 years old, living with relatives in West Virginia while his mother is in state prison for armed robbery - has embarrassed himself by crying in a first-grade class. To toughen him up, his uncle takes one of his daughter's dresses and orders the boy to wear it to school. "Maybe his mother and Uncle Luther were bad influences," Guinn writes, "but Charlie could benefit from Uncle Bill's intercession.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
"I had it all wrong. I thought there would be a public outcry against the exhibition and a supportive critical response," said Paul Schimmel, curator of "Helter Skelter: L.A. Art in the 1990s," as the controversial show approached today's closing. "Instead, the public has loved it. We have had about 100,000 visitors, a phenomenal number for a contemporary art show. They keep coming back and writing favorable comments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2011 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
As a prosecutor, Vincent Bugliosi put Charles Manson behind bars. As an author, he outlined legal cases against O.J. Simpson, Lee Harvey Oswald and George W. Bush. It turns out that Bugliosi was just warming up. Now the author of "Helter Skelter: The True Story of the Manson Murders," has written a book that takes on God. In "Divinity of Doubt: The God Question" (Vanguard Press), the former Los Angeles County deputy district attorney has applied his ample prosecutorial skills to the ultimate mystery: Is there a God and, if so, why does He allow evil?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1992 | MAX BENAVIDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Max Benavidez is a Los Angeles-based writer and critic.
Art--visual, literary or otherwise--is nowadays seldom produced to please. Instead, artists working at the forefront often attempt to unsettle, offend and sometimes even outrage their audience. Hard work, when you stop to think that they must compete for those responses against powerful images from so-called real life.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1996 | CHEO HODARI COKER
In his late-'80s heyday, the D.O.C. was one of the most talented rappers of his generation--the West Coast's answer to Big Daddy Kane. His voice was forceful but smooth, and the flowing cadences on his hit debut "No One Can Do It Better" were potent enough to put even Ice Cube on guard. But a 1989 car accident severed his vocal cords and reduced the rapper's voice to a scratchy shadow of itself. Listening to the D.O.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2004 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
It's 2004 and apparently time for another dramatic reenactment of the Sharon Tate murders. Sunday night brings us "Helter Skelter," the second -- and hopefully the last -- adaptation of Vincent Bugliosi's true-crime memoir of the Manson Family. The movie has its points, but enough is enough. And it's not as if Charlie has been absent from our cultural midst in the 28 years since the last version.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is a Times staff writer
There's nothing harder to change than image. If you're a public figure, you can always hire a press agent to help, but it's a bit harder for a city to transform itself--particularly when the image suits the tourist industry and it's sent around the world on The Big Screen. In the case of Los Angeles, perceptions of the city have permeated the image of the art scene. Fun. Sun. Movie stars. Despite an endless list of L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2004 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
There have long been parts whose talismanic potency has shaped the lives of the actors who've inhabited them. Bela Lugosi was never bigger than as Dracula; Christopher Reeve was forever marked by his association with Superman, Man of Steel. Almost 30 years after he starred in the original 1976 miniseries "Helter Skelter," actor Steve Railsback wonders if playing mass murderer Charles Manson ruined his career.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1992 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Christopher Knight is a Times art critic
Performance art is not a genre included in "Helter Skelter: L.A. Art in the 1990s," the energetic exhibition that has been packing in the crowds at the Museum of Contemporary Art's Little Tokyo satellite for the last three months. Painting, sculpture, drawing, installation art--yes. But, not performance. At least, not directly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2010 | From a Times Staff Writer
Danny Galindo, a retired Los Angeles police detective who helped investigate the notorious Tate-LaBianca murders, died of a heart ailment Tuesday at Huntington Memorial Hospital in Pasadena, his family said. He was 88. "He was an important member of the Manson murders investigative team," said Vincent Bugliosi, who was the chief prosecutor in the case. Cult leader Charles Manson and several followers were sentenced to death (later reduced to life terms) in the 1969 murders of actress Sharon Tate, Leno and Rosemary LaBianca and five others.
OPINION
August 8, 2009 | PATT MORRISON
Vincent Bugliosi has moved on, but the world hasn't. Forty years after the impossibly grisly Tate-LaBianca murders, he is still "the Manson prosecutor." This, in spite of his many books since, arguing with magisterial fury about the JFK assassination, the O.J. Simpson trial, the Bush vs. Gore case and now the Iraq war. His book about the murders masterminded by Charles Manson, "Helter Skelter," written with coauthor Curt Gentry, hasn't been out of print since it appeared in 1974.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2009 | David Ng
Playwrights are known to cultivate their own informal repertory of most-favored actors, and Neil LaBute is certainly no exception. His stable of reliable thespians includes Aaron Eckhart, Paul Rudd, Stephen Pasquale and Ron Eldard. Next month, Eldard will take one of the lead roles in LaBute's "Helter Skelter," a one-act play about a married couple to run Aug. 21 to Sept. 12 at Hollywood's Open Fist Theatre. The play follows the deteriorating relationship between a husband and wife when a cellphone call interrupts their conversation.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2008 | Christopher Knight, Times Art Critic
Everyone has had the experience of disagreeing with a critic, but do critics ever second-guess themselves? We asked Calendar's critics whether there are any reviews they regret. One in a series of occasional articles. -- When "Helter Skelter: L.A. Art in the 1990s" opened at the Museum of Contemporary Art shortly after New Year's in 1992, the show marked a cultural turning point.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2004 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
There have long been parts whose talismanic potency has shaped the lives of the actors who've inhabited them. Bela Lugosi was never bigger than as Dracula; Christopher Reeve was forever marked by his association with Superman, Man of Steel. Almost 30 years after he starred in the original 1976 miniseries "Helter Skelter," actor Steve Railsback wonders if playing mass murderer Charles Manson ruined his career.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2004 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
It's 2004 and apparently time for another dramatic reenactment of the Sharon Tate murders. Sunday night brings us "Helter Skelter," the second -- and hopefully the last -- adaptation of Vincent Bugliosi's true-crime memoir of the Manson Family. The movie has its points, but enough is enough. And it's not as if Charlie has been absent from our cultural midst in the 28 years since the last version.
NEWS
December 22, 1991
Valerie Bertinelli may have gotten top billing in the TV miniseries "In a Child's Name" (CBS, Nov. 17, 19), but Michael Ontkean stole the show as the deadly dentist Ken Taylor. He gave the most chilling performance since Steve Railsback's portrayal of Charles Manson in "Helter Skelter." Kenneth L. Zimmerman, Cypress
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1995 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The D.O.C. was riding high, literally and figuratively, as he drove his brand-new sports car west on the Ventura Freeway toward his Calabasas home late one November night in 1989. Only a day before, the promising rapper with a seemingly limitless future had completed work on a video for his just-released debut album, a work that would eventually sell more than 1 million copies. Celebrating, he had spent the night partying with a girlfriend. "I was the [best]," the D.O.C. says.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2004 | Scott Collins, Times Staff Writer
When conservatives raised a ruckus last year over "The Reagans," CBS ended up dumping the TV movie about the former first family. Then Janet Jackson's impromptu strip during CBS' Super Bowl halftime show reignited a national debate about broadcast indecency. Now the network finds itself with another potentially troublesome project, this one involving mass murderer Charles Manson.
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