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Hemophilia

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NEWS
November 1, 1993 | Associated Press
Geneticists on Sunday reported that they have solved a key mystery about hemophilia and developed a new test for telling women whether they risk bearing sons with the disease. The test should give a definitive answer in about 45% of families affected by severe cases of hemophilia A, the most common form of the blood disorder, researchers said. Hemophilia A appears in about one in every 5,000 males, and about half the cases are considered severe.
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HEALTH
September 13, 2012 | By Elaine Herscher
Genes make us who we are - in sickness and in health. We get our genetic makeup from our parents, of course, but in the future, we might be getting genes from our doctors too. Imagine your doctor promising to cure your cancer or heart disease by prescribing some new snippets of DNA. For some diseases, gene therapy is already a reality. In other cases, genetic cures are still years away. Despite many challenges and setbacks - including some that are surely yet to come - experts predict that gene therapy will eventually become a crucial and even common part of healthcare.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1992
A new genetically engineered drug for the bleeding disorder hemophilia A was approved for marketing by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Thursday. The drug, called factor VIII with the trade name Recombinate, is manufactured by Baxter Healthcare Corp. of Glendale. Earlier this year, FDA also approved a genetically engineered form of factor IX, which is used to treat hemophilia B. In the past, the condition was treated with a clotting factor extracted from human blood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
As pioneering hematologist Dr. Edward Shanbrom looked for simple solutions to complex problems, his home was often his laboratory and common household items his scientific ally. When he needed a filter to test a concept, one made for coffee would do just fine. If he was investigating ideas related to plasma and none was available, he would use milk because it shares many properties with plasma. "I don't do sophisticated science," Shanbrom once said. "My work is quick and feasible" yet could "be very important.
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Implants of genetically engineered skin cells in dogs with hemophilia B, a rare bleeding disorder in which the blood does not clot properly, can bring the symptoms under control for short periods, according to researchers from the Salk Institute in La Jolla.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1988 | LESLIE WOLF, Times Staff Writer
Peggy Kendall held a crumpled paper napkin in her left hand. She eyed a small wastebasket four inches from her bedside. She concentrated. She made a faint tossing gesture, and the napkin rolled off the tips of her dry, delicate fingers and fell to the ground. Frustration flickered across her face, but only briefly. Peggy Kendall had other things to worry about. Just a handful of years ago, Kendall wouldn't have thought twice about disposing of wastepaper.
NEWS
August 31, 1994 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Josiah Andrew Alvarado is buried on a grassy slope in the Hollywood Hills, in the shadow of a stand of giant pine trees and pink-blooming oleanders. His is a simple grave, marked by a brass tablet bearing a quote from Psalms and figures befitting a child just shy of his eighth birthday: a goose and rabbit, a cherub, teddy bear and lamb. His mother doesn't come to the cemetery much. Visiting is too painful. It has been five years since her only child, a hemophiliac, died of AIDS.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2011 | By Sophia Lee, Los Angeles Times
The Painted Turtle camp in Lake Hughes affords two preteens with hemophilia the chance to have fun. Kirin and Bailey Heftye are both handsome, healthy-looking preteen boys. Under a shaded area at an El Monte Starbucks, they frequently interrupt each other to discuss their favorite activities at summer camp. But they are not your typical 12-year-old kids, nor is the camp they attend each year your average summer camp. Kirin and Bailey are twins, and the camp they look forward to attending in early August is the Painted Turtle at Lake Hughes . It's a camp for children affected by serious health conditions including hemophilia, a lifelong, inherited bleeding disorder caused by low or nonexistent levels of blood-clotting protein.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
As pioneering hematologist Dr. Edward Shanbrom looked for simple solutions to complex problems, his home was often his laboratory and common household items his scientific ally. When he needed a filter to test a concept, one made for coffee would do just fine. If he was investigating ideas related to plasma and none was available, he would use milk because it shares many properties with plasma. "I don't do sophisticated science," Shanbrom once said. "My work is quick and feasible" yet could "be very important.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2011 | By Sophia Lee, Los Angeles Times
The Painted Turtle camp in Lake Hughes affords two preteens with hemophilia the chance to have fun. Kirin and Bailey Heftye are both handsome, healthy-looking preteen boys. Under a shaded area at an El Monte Starbucks, they frequently interrupt each other to discuss their favorite activities at summer camp. But they are not your typical 12-year-old kids, nor is the camp they attend each year your average summer camp. Kirin and Bailey are twins, and the camp they look forward to attending in early August is the Painted Turtle at Lake Hughes . It's a camp for children affected by serious health conditions including hemophilia, a lifelong, inherited bleeding disorder caused by low or nonexistent levels of blood-clotting protein.
NATIONAL
March 13, 2010 | By Andrew Zajac
Federal health officials announced Friday that they would reexamine a 27-year-old set of restrictions on blood donations by gay men. The restrictions, enacted in the early years of the AIDS epidemic in the United States, impose a lifetime ban on men donating blood if they've had sex with another man at any time since 1977. In recent years, the American Red Cross, the American Assn. of Blood Banks and America's Blood Centers, which collectively represent almost all blood banks in the country, have recommended loosening the restrictions to allow men who have abstained from gay sex for one year to donate blood.
HEALTH
February 28, 2005 | From Reuters
A single dose of a drug already used to treat hemophilia can help limit brain damage caused by the deadliest and most debilitating form of stroke, researchers have found. Chief author Stephan Mayer said he was "stunned" by the finding involving the drug recombinant activated factor VII, which is sold for hemophilia treatment under the brand name NovoSeven by Denmark's Novo Nordisk.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
In a closely watched court decision, a doctor accused of negligence in the death of a hemophiliac infected with HIV was found not guilty after a four-year trial. Takeshi Abe, 84, a hemophilia expert and vice president of Teikyo University, headed a government panel on AIDS in 1983 and 1984 and opposed swift approval of heat-treated blood products already in use in other countries. In 1996, the mother of a hemophiliac who died in 1991 brought a criminal suit against Abe.
NEWS
October 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
Robert Ray, one of three AIDS-exposed hemophiliac brothers who won a court battle 13 years ago to return to public school only to be burned out of their home by an arsonist, died Friday. He was 22. Ray, infected through contaminated blood products used to treat his hemophilia, died at All Children's Hospital of complications from both diseases, the St. Petersburg hospital said in a statement.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1999 | PAUL JACOBS
Hemophilia is a hereditary bleeding disorder that plagued the descendants of Britain's Queen Victoria. One major form of the disease is caused by a defect in a gene that normally produces a factor vital to forming blood clots. In the most severe cases, any small cut or bruise can cause excessive bleeding. The condition is treated now by using injections to supply the missing blood factor, but the repeated bleeding takes its toll on patients, especially when it flows into joints.
NEWS
May 20, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The House voted to grant $100,000 each to hemophilia sufferers who contracted the HIV virus in the 1980s because of tainted blood supplies. The measure provides $750 million for the roughly 7,200 hemophiliacs who came down with the AIDS-causing virus after receiving contaminated blood-clotting products. The grants go to the families of those who are deceased. About half of all American hemophiliacs were infected with HIV before protections were put in place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1990 | From Times staff and wire reports
Doctors report that a new drug designed to help make blood clot in people with hemophilia is safe and effective. The drug is supposed to be an exact copy of the natural clotting substance known as factor VIII. It was developed through genetic engineering techniques by Cutter Biological in Berkeley.
NEWS
May 20, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The House voted to grant $100,000 each to hemophilia sufferers who contracted the HIV virus in the 1980s because of tainted blood supplies. The measure provides $750 million for the roughly 7,200 hemophiliacs who came down with the AIDS-causing virus after receiving contaminated blood-clotting products. The grants go to the families of those who are deceased. About half of all American hemophiliacs were infected with HIV before protections were put in place.
NEWS
March 3, 1998 | From Associated Press
Scientists have altered a gene in rats' livers by injecting a "repairman" molecule into the animals' bloodstreams. The technique might lead to an eventual cure for hemophilia and some other inherited diseases in people. The startling thing was how well it worked, scientists said. The treatment produced a specific change in about 40% of the rat liver's supply of the targeted gene.
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