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Hemophiliacs

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NEWS
August 19, 1988
Hemophiliacs who have tested HIV-positive are being sought by a new study to determine if the taking of the drug AZT can prevent or stall the onset of AIDS in hemophiliacs. Participants must be 12 or older, show no symptoms of AIDS and must have a T4 helper cell count of 500 or less. They will be seen at hemophilia treatment centers weekly for the first eight weeks of research, every two weeks for the following two months, and every month thereafter.
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NATIONAL
November 30, 2006 | Robert Little, The Baltimore Sun
Two senators called on the Pentagon on Wednesday to investigate the military's use of a largely experimental blood-coagulating drug that doctors inject into wounded troops to control bleeding, but which has been linked to unexpected and potentially deadly blood clots. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski (D-Md.) sent a letter to Dr. William Winkenwerder Jr., assistant secretary of Defense for health affairs, asking him to launch an investigation into use of the drug, called Recombinant Activated Factor VII.
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NEWS
May 9, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Two hemophiliacs infected with the AIDS virus filed a ground-breaking lawsuit Monday in Osaka District Court, suing the government and two Japanese drug companies for failing to protect them from imported supplies of contaminated blood products. Fumio Akase, 52, a calligrapher from Ehime prefecture, and a fellow plaintiff from Kyoto whose name was not made public demanded $1.77 million in damages, alleging that they were infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, because the government was negligent in screening imported blood products.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2003 | From Associated Press
Several hemophiliacs filed a lawsuit against Bayer Corp. and other companies, claiming they exposed patients to HIV and hepatitis C by selling medicine made with blood from sick, high-risk donors. The lawsuit alleges that the companies continued distributing the blood-clotting product in Asia and Latin America in 1984 and 1985, even after they stopped selling it in the U.S. because of the known risk of HIV and hepatitis transmission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1987 | MARIANN HANSEN, Times Staff Writer
It always has been difficult for parents and their hemophiliac children to cope with the life-threatening blood ailment, but today they face even more anxiety--the threat of AIDS. A health educator is trying to help hemophiliacs and their parents in Orange County deal with the psychological and social stigma attached to AIDS, a fatal disease that attacks the body's immune system. The task is so great that the educator likens it "to being dropped by helicopter in Antarctica with an ice pick."
BUSINESS
April 20, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Bayer and three other makers of blood products defeated an effort to reopen a $670-million class-action settlement with hemophiliacs who received clotting concentrates tainted with the virus that causes AIDS. The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected an appeal by a group of plaintiffs' lawyers who were seeking to increase the $40 million allocated for attorneys' fees under the settlement. The appeal, had it been successful, could have forced Bayer, Rhone-Poulenc, Baxter International Inc.
NEWS
April 5, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
The first human trials of genetically engineered Factor VIII, the clotting agent missing from the blood of most hemophiliacs, were begun last week by scientists at the University of North Carolina. Hemophiliacs receive injections of Factor VIII, isolated from human blood plasma, to keep from potentially bleeding to death from even a minor cut or a bruise. Sometimes, however, Factor VIII is contaminated with viruses.
NEWS
July 25, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Rock Hudson has AIDS and has been suffering from the usually fatal disease for more than a year, a spokeswoman said today. The 59-year-old actor, whose emaciated looks in a TV appearance with former co-star Doris Day a week ago startled his fans, is also being treated at the American Hospital of Paris for an undetermined liver ailment, his spokeswoman, Yanou Collart, said. The statement she read to reporters said: "Rock Hudson has acquired immune deficiency syndrome."
NEWS
May 15, 1985 | United Press International
The AIDS virus can remain in a person's body for five years or longer without producing disease although it can still be transmitted to other people, doctors at the Centers for Disease Control said today. The findings indicate that simply because a person who was exposed to the virus years ago has not shown any symptoms of the disease does not mean he or she cannot infect someone else.
NEWS
August 1, 1985 | Associated Press
Officials barred a 13-year-old boy from school after learning that he had contracted AIDS during treatment for hemophilia, saying the school cannot cope with the necessary precautions and that other pupils could be at risk. "I'm pretty upset about it," Ryan White said Wednesday. "I'll miss my friends, mostly." "Ryan's been robbed of a lot of things," said his mother, Jeanne. "Ever since he's been diagnosed, we've had to fight for everything, and I guess it's going to keep going on."
HEALTH
June 11, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Hemophilia would appear to be one of the best candidates among genetic diseases for gene therapy. Victims are missing one of two enzymes, called Factor VIII and Factor IX, that are crucial for the clotting of blood. Various studies have shown that inducing production of as little as 5% of the normal amount of either enzyme is sufficient to reduce bleeding and other symptoms and greatly improve the quality of life. But attempts at gene therapy have had little overall success.
NEWS
March 31, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the judge read the "not guilty" verdict in Tokyo District Court Room 104 this week, a shock wave hit the gallery and quickly spread across the nation. Takeshi Abe, a powerful doctor suspected of playing a key role in one of the greatest medical scandals in Japanese history, had been absolved of all responsibility. Prosecutors had accused Abe of knowingly prolonging Japan's use of unheated blood products in the 1980s, ultimately resulting in the AIDS deaths of hundreds of hemophiliacs.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
In a closely watched court decision, a doctor accused of negligence in the death of a hemophiliac infected with HIV was found not guilty after a four-year trial. Takeshi Abe, 84, a hemophilia expert and vice president of Teikyo University, headed a government panel on AIDS in 1983 and 1984 and opposed swift approval of heat-treated blood products already in use in other countries. In 1996, the mother of a hemophiliac who died in 1991 brought a criminal suit against Abe.
HEALTH
June 28, 1999 | SUSAN OKIE, WASHINGTON POST
Earlier this month, Donald N. Miller rolled up his sleeve in a Pittsburgh hospital and became the first person to receive an experimental gene-therapy treatment aimed at curing the most common kind of hemophilia. An inherited bleeding disorder, hemophilia affects about 20,000 male Americans.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Bayer and three other makers of blood products defeated an effort to reopen a $670-million class-action settlement with hemophiliacs who received clotting concentrates tainted with the virus that causes AIDS. The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected an appeal by a group of plaintiffs' lawyers who were seeking to increase the $40 million allocated for attorneys' fees under the settlement. The appeal, had it been successful, could have forced Bayer, Rhone-Poulenc, Baxter International Inc.
NEWS
May 20, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The House voted to grant $100,000 each to hemophilia sufferers who contracted the HIV virus in the 1980s because of tainted blood supplies. The measure provides $750 million for the roughly 7,200 hemophiliacs who came down with the AIDS-causing virus after receiving contaminated blood-clotting products. The grants go to the families of those who are deceased. About half of all American hemophiliacs were infected with HIV before protections were put in place.
NEWS
October 3, 1985 | TED THACKREY JR., Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Actor Rock Hudson lost his yearlong struggle against AIDS Wednesday, dying of complications arising from the incurable disease he had helped bring to worldwide attention. Hudson, 59, a longtime Hollywood star who stunned the world three months ago when he revealed that he was suffering from acquired immune deficiency syndrome, died quietly in his sleep at his Beverly Hills home. His publicist, Dale Olson, said only members of Hudson's personal staff were present. Hudson had no close family and memorial arrangements were pending.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
In a closely watched court decision, a doctor accused of negligence in the death of a hemophiliac infected with HIV was found not guilty after a four-year trial. Takeshi Abe, 84, a hemophilia expert and vice president of Teikyo University, headed a government panel on AIDS in 1983 and 1984 and opposed swift approval of heat-treated blood products already in use in other countries. In 1996, the mother of a hemophiliac who died in 1991 brought a criminal suit against Abe.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1997 | (Associated Press)
About 6,200 hemophiliacs who contracted the AIDS virus through tainted blood products have reluctantly accepted a $600-million settlement from four drug firms. The approval by U.S. District Judge John Grady in Chicago paved the way for $100,000 individual payments to begin going to hemophiliacs or their surviving families this summer. The firms--Deerfield, Ill.-based Baxter International Inc.; Armour Pharmaceutical/Rhone-Poulenc Rorer Inc.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1996 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to close a tragic chapter in the AIDS saga, representatives of thousands of hemophiliacs infected with HIV from tainted blood products told four drug makers Thursday that they are prepared to accept a modified $640-million settlement. Under the plan, the companies would pay as much as $40 million in legal costs plus $100,000 each to about 6,000 U.S. hemophiliacs who became infected with human immunodeficiency virus from contaminated blood-clotting medications.
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