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NATIONAL
November 7, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Colorado officials will weigh new rules regulating the state's legal hemp industry and could act as soon as next week. Officials unveiled the rules Wednesday at a public meeting in Lakewood, according to the Denver Post. The regulations, developed by an industrial hemp advisory committee, will go next week to the state Department of Agriculture. Amendment 64, the 2012 Colorado ballot initiative that legalized marijuana, also provided for state licensing of industrial hemp farming.
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HEALTH
April 4, 2014 | By Dana Sullivan Kilroy
Not milk? Choosing milk for your morning cereal or coffee used to be pretty simple: skim, low-fat or whole. These days, though, market shelves and refrigerators are crowded with an array of alternatives: soy, almond, rice, hemp and more. While some people opt for these beverages because they're vegan, they have allergies or because they're lactose intolerant, the beverages are increasingly popular for another reason too. "We're all being encouraged to eat a more plant-based diet, and some of these products fit that category," says Andrea Giancoli, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and a policy analyst at the Beach Cities Health District Blue Zones Project in Hermosa Beach, an initiative to develop healthier communities.
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HEALTH
May 21, 2007
I loved your article on hemp as a food source ["Soy's New Competition: Hemp," May 14], but you failed to mention that hemp doesn't have seeds per se. They are more correctly identified as an achene, which is defined as: A small, dry, indehiscent one-seeded fruit with a thin wall, as in the sunflower. I hope to see more articles on this very good source of food and nutrition. JEFF JONES Los Angeles
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | By Ted Rall
The statewide legalization of marijuana in Colorado, for recreational as well as medicinal use, has prompted serious consideration of the drug's health effects and socio-political ramifications. Well, that sure took awhile. On the pro side, it's been pretty much established that driving stoned isn't nearly as dangerous as driving drunk . Since 7% of California motorists are cruising the state's freeways with cannabis in their systems, that provides some comfort. (Sorry, no word on what percentage of the stoners are drunk as well.)
REAL ESTATE
July 24, 2005 | From Times wire reports
An Australian architect is having a house built from hemp, the botanical relative of cannabis, and is harvesting 2.5 million plants that will be ground up and used to make bricks. The hemp bricks are said to have better insulating qualities than traditional ones. The hemp used has a low level of THC, the active chemical in marijuana.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2006 | George Skelton
AB 1147 is not the biggest bill of this legislative session, but it is one of the most intriguing -- and most fun. Start with its purpose: to legalize the growing of hemp, a cousin of marijuana -- both members of the notorious cannabis family. Then proceed to the bill's joint authors, a pun that's unavoidable. One is a liberal San Francisco Democrat, Assemblyman Mark Leno; the other a conservative Irvine Republican, Chuck DeVore.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1996
A few weeks ago, I bought a pair of Adidas shoes. Then I read "Sneaker Madness" (Jan.13), an account in The Times of Adidas President Steve Wynne's justification of the name Hemp for its new footwear, following a request by Lee Brown, director of the White House's National Drug Control Policy Office, for Adidas to change the name since "hemp" is also street slang for marijuana. Wynne's reply to Lee Brown: No one's "smoking our shoes." But hey, we all understand the Steve Wynne philosophy.
MAGAZINE
February 8, 2004
Let's nip this hemp threat in the bud ("The Demonized Seed," by Lee Green, Jan. 18). If we let farmers grow industrial hemp, won't everyone rush out to get stoned? I propose that we immediately outlaw our state flower, the golden poppy, because other varieties can produce opium. And how can we ever control psychedelic mushrooms unless we raid every shiitake and portabello farm? Seriously, let's get beyond the paranoia and make use of this important resource. John Clement Arleta Green's article was outstanding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1994 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For a brief few months this year, Chris Boucher was the first American entrepreneur in nearly half a century to grow hemp legally in the United States. By the end of July, he was the last. Boucher, 32, owns the Costa Mesa-based Hempstead Co., which imports hemp fabric from China and Hungary and fashions it into backpacks, clothing, caps and accessories sold at more than 1,000 stores nationwide.
IMAGE
June 19, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Much as they're trumpeted by so-called eco-designers, plant-based alternatives to cotton are a minuscule piece of the fashion puzzle. Dwarfed by cotton and synthetics such as polyester, spandex and rayon, textiles made from flax, wood pulp, hemp and bamboo make up less than 2% of the market. But that percentage is growing due to consumer and corporate demand, as well as technological advancements that make natural fibers easier to transform into wearable fabrics. One of the more promising developments in sustainable textiles is flax , a stalky and fibrous plant that can be grown with far less water and fewer pesticides than cotton and produced at a lower price.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Colorado officials will weigh new rules regulating the state's legal hemp industry and could act as soon as next week. Officials unveiled the rules Wednesday at a public meeting in Lakewood, according to the Denver Post. The regulations, developed by an industrial hemp advisory committee, will go next week to the state Department of Agriculture. Amendment 64, the 2012 Colorado ballot initiative that legalized marijuana, also provided for state licensing of industrial hemp farming.
NATIONAL
October 11, 2013 | By Jenny Deam
SPRINGFIELD, Colo. - Out near a lonely highway southwest of town, a farmer's son stuck some seeds in the ground last spring to see what would happen. What he pulled from the soil made history and has sown new hope for struggling farmers both here and across the nation. Last weekend, 41-year-old Ryan Loflin, a fifth-generation Coloradan, along with an enthusiastic crew of 45 volunteers, harvested what is being called the first U.S. crop of commercial hemp in more than half a century.
HEALTH
April 6, 2013 | By Martha Rose Shulman
What's a healthful food and what's a healing food? Is there a difference? At least since the mid-19th century, when the Battle Creek Sanitarium opened its doors and people flocked there to follow John Harvey Kellogg's regime of whole grains, nuts and frequent enemas, many Americans have sought food as medicine. I have a shelf of books with titles such as "Food - Your Miracle Medicine" and "The Food Pharmacy," and my smartphone is filled with snapshots of the "super foods" on display at a trade show: acai and goldenberry, chia, coconut and flax, goji berries and hemp, maca root and other berries, nuts, seaweeds and roots I've never heard of (yacon, lucuma, camu, maqui)
OPINION
February 25, 2013
As states of a more liberal bent battle the federal government over the legalization of medical and even recreational marijuana, another cannabis battle has reemerged in the farm states. But if pot smoking raises troubling moral and safety questions, industrial hemp does not. Activists have been struggling to legalize hemp for decades in the U.S., but only recently has the issue seemingly caught fire in Congress. Last week, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell signed on to legislation that had for years been championed by Texas Rep. Ron Paul, the former GOP presidential contender, and has now been taken up by his son Rand, the Republican senator from Kentucky.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2011
EVENTS The L.A. Convention Center will host two events this weekend that should be able to play together nicely: The 2011 Exxxotica adult fair, which bills itself as the largest event in the country devoted to love and sex, and Hemp Con, dedicated to celebrating medical marijuana. If the participants of these two fests don't get together and braid some sort of giant sex swing out of hemp rope, they've missed a golden opportunity. L.A. Convention Center, 1201 S. Figueroa St. Exxxotica hours: 4-11 p.m. Fri.; noon-11 p.m. Sat.; noon-7 p.m. Sun. $35 a day. exxxoticaexpo.com.
IMAGE
June 19, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
COTTON Prized for: Soft feel and easy maintenance; wide availability Percentage of clothes sold in the U.S. that incorporate cotton: Almost 75% Primary sources: China, India, U.S. FLAX Prized for: Color and performance traits similar to cotton; plants require no irrigation and fewer chemical fertilizers and pesticides than cotton Percentage of clothes sold in the U.S. that incorporate flax: 1.1% Primary sources:...
IMAGE
June 19, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
COTTON Prized for: Soft feel and easy maintenance; wide availability Percentage of clothes sold in the U.S. that incorporate cotton: Almost 75% Primary sources: China, India, U.S. FLAX Prized for: Color and performance traits similar to cotton; plants require no irrigation and fewer chemical fertilizers and pesticides than cotton Percentage of clothes sold in the U.S. that incorporate flax: 1.1% Primary sources:...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2010 | By John Hoeffel, Los Angeles Times
Jack Herer, an energetic advocate for marijuana legalization who was a mesmerizing presence on the Venice Boardwalk and achieved worldwide renown after he wrote a treatise extolling the virtues of hemp, died April 15. He was 70. Herer suffered a debilitating heart attack in September, minutes after he delivered a typically pugnacious pro-pot speech at the Hempstalk festival in Portland, Ore., insisting that marijuana ought to be smoked morning, noon...
IMAGE
June 19, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Much as they're trumpeted by so-called eco-designers, plant-based alternatives to cotton are a minuscule piece of the fashion puzzle. Dwarfed by cotton and synthetics such as polyester, spandex and rayon, textiles made from flax, wood pulp, hemp and bamboo make up less than 2% of the market. But that percentage is growing due to consumer and corporate demand, as well as technological advancements that make natural fibers easier to transform into wearable fabrics. One of the more promising developments in sustainable textiles is flax , a stalky and fibrous plant that can be grown with far less water and fewer pesticides than cotton and produced at a lower price.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2010
STAGE "Elektra" A new translation of Sophocles' "Elektra" springs to life on the Getty Villa's outdoor stage. Starring Tyrees Allen and Olympia Dukakis, the spare and modern interpretation tells the tragic tale of willful memory, vengeance and the damage that happens to someone who refuses to forget. Getty Villa Barbara and Lawrence Fleischman Theater, 17985 Pacific Coast Highway, Pacific Palisades. 8 p.m. Thu.-Sat. Ends Oct. 2. $42, (310) 440-7300. http://www.getty.edu. EVENTS HempCon Amid the controversy surrounding medical marijuana, pot dispensaries and Proposition 19 (which would legalize possession in California)
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