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ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1988 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Tito, the hyperactive Chihuahua in "Oliver & Company," steals his scenes as easily as he swipes a car stereo in Disney's new animated feature. The character was created by comedian Cheech Marin, who provided his raucous voice ("Check it out!") and supervising animator Hendel Butoy. "Doing Tito was like recording a comedy album--I went into the studio and did the voice, which I really enjoyed," said Marin in a telephone interview from Orlando, Fla., where he's shooting a film.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1988 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Tito, the hyperactive Chihuahua in "Oliver & Company," steals his scenes as easily as he swipes a car stereo in Disney's new animated feature. The character was created by comedian Cheech Marin, who provided his raucous voice ("Check it out!") and supervising animator Hendel Butoy. "Doing Tito was like recording a comedy album--I went into the studio and did the voice, which I really enjoyed," said Marin in a telephone interview from Orlando, Fla., where he's shooting a film.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Bob Newhart and Eva Gabor will repeat their roles as the voices of Bernard and Bianca, the mice from Disney's 1977 animated feature "The Rescuers," in "The Rescuers Down Under," slated for 1990. The new film marks the first time Disney has made a sequel to a cartoon feature.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1990 | JACK MATHEWS, TIMES FILM EDITOR
Martin Scorsese's "GoodFellas" won five awards, including those for best picture and best director, at Saturday's year-end voting by the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn. The mob drama, adapted from Nicholas Pileggi's nonfiction bestseller about career New York hoods, also won supporting actor awards for Joe Pesci and Lorraine Bracco. "GoodFellas' " fifth award went to cinematographer Michael Ballhaus.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Sixty years is quite a gap between an original and a sequel, but the 1940 "Fantasia" was never business as usual. A melding of animation and classical music, it has been ignored (by audiences at its initial release), embraced (by succeeding generations), celebrated (for its "Sorcerer's Apprentice" sequence) and reviled (abstract filmmaker Oskar Fischinger called it "a conglomeration of tastelessness").
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1986 | CHARLES SOLOMON
"The Great Mouse Detective" (citywide) is the most entertaining animated feature the Disney studio has produced since "The Jungle Book," in 1967. It's the first one completed since Walt Disney's death in 1966 that the artists could show to him without apologies or explanations. This unpretentious film with its strong, well-told story could be the long-awaited hit to spark a renaissance in American animation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1988 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Although it has virtually nothing to do with Dickens, Disney's "Oliver & Company," (citywide) a new animated feature "inspired" by "Oliver Twist," is a bright, upbeat comedy that should appeal to audiences of all ages. The contemporary tone and broader, more cartoon-style animation puts "Oliver" in the tradition of "The Jungle Book," rather than "Pinocchio," and MTV seems to have been more of an influence than the European storybook illustrations of "Snow White."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With its exhilarating action sequences, Walt Disney Pictures' "The Rescuers Down Under" challenges the adventure films of Spielberg and Lucas and confirms the special power of animation to present extravagant fantasies on screen. The first sequel in the studio's history and its 29th feature-length cartoon, "Rescuers Down Under" (citywide and suitable for all ages) suggests a new direction for Disney animation.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1997 | JUDY BRENNAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The idea to revise and update the animation classic "Fantasia" popped into Roy E. Disney's head in 1974. Disney, the nephew of Walt Disney, proposed the concept to Disney Chairman Michael Eisner 10 years later. Production began in 1990 with a 1997 release date that had originally been planned to share the spotlight with "Hercules." But the road has been anything but smooth.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1999 | CHARLES SOLOMON, Charles Solomon writes regularly about animation for Calendar
Director Hayao Miyazaki makes his animated features primarily for Japanese audiences. Yet in his celebrated career as a filmmaker, he's become one of the most respected figures in animation in the world. Miyazaki is one of the few directors working in feature animation with an immediately recognizable visual style.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1986 | CHARLES SOLOMON
"The acting is what I like about Disney animation," says supervising animator Mark Henn. "I have high hopes and aspirations for pushing the art of character animation a lot further. Ideally, I'd like to be good at whatever they hand me, but I prefer to do the acting, the close-up work with the characters." Henn is one of the talented young artists who have reasserted Disney's preeminent position in animation with the recently released "The Great Mouse Detective."
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