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Henri Matisse

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
A Henri Matisse painting stolen a decade ago from a museum in Venezuela has been recovered 1,300 miles away in Florida. Matisse's "Odalisque in Red Pants," worth $3 million, was taken from the Sofia Imber Contemporary Art Museum and replaced with a fake, CNN reports, although officials aren't sure how thieves lifted the 1925 masterpiece -- or when. On Tuesday, a man and woman allegedly tried to sell the artwork for $740,000 to an undercover FBI agent in Miami. Pedro Antonio Marcuello Guzman, 46, of Miami, and Maria Martha Elisa Ornelas Lazo, 50, of Mexico City, have been charged with transporting and possessing stolen property.
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WORLD
November 5, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON -- A massive cache of art discovered in the Munich apartment of an elderly recluse contains hitherto-unknown works by famous artists as well as pieces believed confiscated by the Nazis in their persecution of Jews or their campaign against “degenerate art,” German prosecutors said Tuesday. Some of the 1,400 items are known masterpieces believed destroyed during World War II; others are new to art historians, such as a self-portrait by painter Otto Dix. The hoard boasts works by giants of the 20th century -- Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Marc Chagall, Max Liebermann -- but also some older pieces, including a painting from the 16th century.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2005 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Sister Jacques-Marie, a Dominican nun whose friendship with artist Henri Matisse led him to create the Chapel of the Rosary in Vence, France, died Monday. She was 84, according to Barbara Freed, a friend of several years. She died of respiratory disease and other ailments at Les Embruns, a rehabilitation center in Bidart, France, that is operated by the Dominican nuns.
WORLD
November 5, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - Unknown masterpieces by artists such as Marc Chagall and Henri Matisse, works thought lost to the ravages of war and others deemed "degenerate" or looted by the Nazis form part of the spectacular trove of art discovered by German authorities in the apartment of an elderly recluse in Munich. Two days after news of the find broke, officials in southern Germany revealed Tuesday that the hoard contains 1,406 pieces by masters whose names read like a who's who of Western art of the last 150 years: Pablo Picasso, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, Gustave Courbet, Oskar Kokoschka, Emil Nolde.
BOOKS
September 25, 2005 | Richard Eder, Richard Eder, former book critic for The Times, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1987.
MONUMENTAL is the usual term for a biography that is profoundly researched, soberly though strikingly thought out and very long. To use the word for Hilary Spurling's biography of Henri Matisse, occupying two volumes and more than 1,000 pages, would not do it justice. For one thing, it is written with unfailing grace, clarity and darting insight (astonishing for a dart to cover such a distance), its mass of materials all but volatilized.
NEWS
November 2, 1998 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1905, while living in the Mediterranean fishing village of Collioure on the frontier of Spain and France, Henri Matisse completed a painting titled "Luxe, calme et volupte." Taking his title from the refrain of the Baudelaire poem "Invitation to a Voyage," Matisse was painting on a personal frontier.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
An Henri Matisse painting not seen in public for more than 50 years went on view Wednesday at the National Gallery of Art's exhibition "Henri Matisse: The Early Years in Nice, 1916-1930" in Washington. The painting, "La Toque de Velours Bleu" ("The Blue Velour Hat") features Matisse's daughter Marguerite. It was last seen in Switzerland in 1931 and had been presumed lost until it surfaced recently at the Norton Gallery of Art in West Palm Beach, Fla.
TRAVEL
May 20, 1990 | LUREE MILLER, Miller is a Washington-based free-lance writer whose most recent book is "Literary Village of London" (Starrhill Press)
Henri Matisse saw this city as an earthly paradise. The artist visited twice, in 1912 and 1913, in search of a new direction for his art, and found inspiration for his greatest works in the bright African light, vivid colors and languid sensuality of the Moroccan landscape and architecture, the gardens and the people. So when I visited Morocco's fabled city on the northwest edge of Africa last year, I decided to follow in the footsteps--or rather the brush strokes--of Matisse.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2003 | Diane Haithman
More than 100 paintings, sculptures, drawings and original prints by prominent 20th century artists, including nearly 50 artworks by Henri Matisse, have been donated to New York City's Metropolitan Museum of Art from a foundation named after the artist's younger son, Pierre, and Pierre's wife. The donation from the Pierre and Maria-Gaetana Matisse Foundation is valued at nearly $100 million and includes work by modern artists Balthus, Chagall, Derain, Dubuffet, Giacometti, Miro and Tanguy.
NEWS
January 11, 1987 | Associated Press
A painting by Henri Matisse that had not been seen publicly since it was exhibited in Berlin in 1930 has turned up in an art gallery after spending 38 years in the home of a Palm Beach couple. The painting, "Marguerite, la Toque de Velours Bleu," or "Marguerite in the Blue Velvet Hat," is a portrait of Matisse's daughter that was painted in 1915 or 1916.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
At the Municipal Art Gallery in Barnsdall Park, the title of the exhibition "Lost (in L.A.)" pretty much describes how I felt when looking at its many sculptures, installations, videos and a few paintings. Thematic art exhibitions are sometimes puzzling, with the reasoning behind the general selection of artists or juxtapositions of specific works obscure, and that's certainly the case here. A subtitle could be: "Huh?" One of the more enchanting objects on display is a 1946 letter, although in the upper left corner, just above the salutation, it does sport a small, doodle-like ink drawing of an apple wearing a mask.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
A Henri Matisse painting stolen a decade ago from a museum in Venezuela has been recovered 1,300 miles away in Florida. Matisse's "Odalisque in Red Pants," worth $3 million, was taken from the Sofia Imber Contemporary Art Museum and replaced with a fake, CNN reports, although officials aren't sure how thieves lifted the 1925 masterpiece -- or when. On Tuesday, a man and woman allegedly tried to sell the artwork for $740,000 to an undercover FBI agent in Miami. Pedro Antonio Marcuello Guzman, 46, of Miami, and Maria Martha Elisa Ornelas Lazo, 50, of Mexico City, have been charged with transporting and possessing stolen property.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
Mickalene Thomas is to contemporary painting what Daft Punk is to music: acclaimed as one of the more original remix artists working today. The 41-year-old Brooklyn artist has borrowed images and poses from established masters such as Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, Edouard Manet, Henri Matisse and Romare Bearden in her paintings. But her most recent work owes a particularly explicit debt to Gustave Courbet, the 19th-century French realist who famously painted a graphic (some say pornographic)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2011 | By Leah Ollman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Reporting from San Diego ? At 78, Howard Hodgkin has slowed a bit, requiring a wheelchair lately to move about, but he remains quick as ever to speak his mind and, judging by the San Diego Museum of Art's exhibition of his recent work, compelled as ever to paint the wealth of memories and sensations that occupy it. The London-based artist appeared proud as he surveyed the show, before its opening in late January. He scoffed mildly, though, at the "innocuous and rather silly title" ?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2009 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Thieves stole works by Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse and others from a Berlin gallery over the New Year's holiday, police said Friday. More than 30 works, in total worth an estimated $250,000, were stolen, apparently between Wednesday afternoon and lunchtime Thursday, police spokeswoman Claudia Schweiger said. The artwork was taken from the Fasanengalerie, a private gallery near western Berlin's central shopping district. The etchings, prints and sculptures included "Profil au fond noir," a 1947 work by Picasso; "Nude in a rocking chair," a Matisse print from 1913; and "Le Boupeut," a 1962 color print by Georges Braque.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A Henri Matisse painting was auctioned at Christie's for $33.6 million, a record for the artist. The 1937 oil-on-canvas work "L'Odalisque, Harmonie Bleue," which features one of the artist's favorite models lounging behind a table with a bouquet, was purchased Tuesday night by an unidentified buyer, the auction house announced. The previous auction record for a Matisse painting was $22 million for "Danseuse dans le fauteuil, sol en damier," a 1942 work, at Sotheby's in June.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2009 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Thieves stole works by Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse and others from a Berlin gallery over the New Year's holiday, police said Friday. More than 30 works, in total worth an estimated $250,000, were stolen, apparently between Wednesday afternoon and lunchtime Thursday, police spokeswoman Claudia Schweiger said. The artwork was taken from the Fasanengalerie, a private gallery near western Berlin's central shopping district. The etchings, prints and sculptures included "Profil au fond noir," a 1947 work by Picasso; "Nude in a rocking chair," a Matisse print from 1913; and "Le Boupeut," a 1962 color print by Georges Braque.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2007 | Jamie Stengle, Associated Press
A new exhibit will focus on sculptures by Henri Matisse, the French artist best known for his vibrant paintings. The exhibit "Matisse: Painter as Sculptor" showcases more than 150 works -- including more than 40 sculptures -- and gives a glimpse of how Matisse explored recurrent themes as he worked in mediums including sculpture, painting, sketches and even paper cutouts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2005 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
Call them brothers separated at birth. One, raised in a secure part of Europe, was a fair-haired boy praised as a genius from the moment he drew his first picture. Success followed success, the world's horrors rarely touched him, and he was celebrated in death, as in life, as a visionary. The other, weaned in his nation's armpit, was dismissed from childhood as a fool or a madman -- even by his friends.
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