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Henrietta Shore

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May 20, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT
Henrietta Shore is back. Sort of. In 1986, about a quarter-century after the artist had died penniless and forgotten in a San Jose sanitarium at the age of 83, Shore was the subject of a full retrospective of paintings, drawings and prints at the little Monterey Peninsula Museum of Art in Northern California. (She had moved from Los Angeles to Carmel in 1930.
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December 19, 2010 | By Liesl Bradner, Los Angeles Times
In 1926 Touring Topics (the predecessor to Westways), the magazine of the Automobile Club of Southern California, was changing directions. The editors shifted gears from a solely automobile-related publication, expanding their focus to regional culture and travel destinations. The guiding force behind this transition was editor Phil Townsend Hanna, who initiated the cover art program and showcased images from California artists to reflect the content and mission of the magazine. FOR THE RECORD: Westways cover art: The California Imagery article Dec. 19 about the Westways cover art collection at the Pasadena Museum of California Art misspelled the last name of one of the cover artists.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2010 | By Liesl Bradner, Los Angeles Times
In 1926 Touring Topics (the predecessor to Westways), the magazine of the Automobile Club of Southern California, was changing directions. The editors shifted gears from a solely automobile-related publication, expanding their focus to regional culture and travel destinations. The guiding force behind this transition was editor Phil Townsend Hanna, who initiated the cover art program and showcased images from California artists to reflect the content and mission of the magazine. FOR THE RECORD: Westways cover art: The California Imagery article Dec. 19 about the Westways cover art collection at the Pasadena Museum of California Art misspelled the last name of one of the cover artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT
Henrietta Shore is back. Sort of. In 1986, about a quarter-century after the artist had died penniless and forgotten in a San Jose sanitarium at the age of 83, Shore was the subject of a full retrospective of paintings, drawings and prints at the little Monterey Peninsula Museum of Art in Northern California. (She had moved from Los Angeles to Carmel in 1930.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens has acquired works to fill a gallery space set to open in July 2014 that will be devoted to geometric abstraction and pop art. Made possible by an anonymous donation, two of the works are by the late minimalist, Tony Smith. “For W.A.” is an 1969 abstract bronze sculpture in two parts, each a five-foot-high “rhombic prism,” as the Huntington calls the dark, velvety-looking blocks. The other Smith work, untitled, is an abstract oil on canvas, in deep green and red tones, that the artist made in 1960.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1996 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
'California, from an eastern perspective, has generally been seen as another country on the far edge of America, only tenuously attached to what is understood as Western civilization," Paul J. Karlstrom writes in the introduction to a new book on art in California. Furthermore, because the state has been identified with Hollywood and popular culture, it has been denied its rightful place in the mainstream of Modernism, he argues.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1991 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly about art for Westside/Valley Calendar.
Pushing the boundaries of what is typically considered photography, the Gallery at 817 has organized "Los Angeles Emerging Artists Exhibition," a show of photography-based work by 13 artists, half of them women, who are not formally represented and have not exhibited extensively in the Los Angeles area. For this show, the gallery put out an open call for slide submissions in Artweek and at colleges and art schools in the area.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1991 | SUVAN GEER, SPEICAL TO THE TIMES
Approachable Abstractions by David Lloyd The fluid, dynamic shapes of David Lloyd's abstract paintings are about the most energetic, entertaining and playful romps to demystify abstraction since Elizabeth Murray. Unlike Murray, however, Lloyd's works draw their approachability not from Pop cartoonishness, but from the slippery, organic plasticity of nature.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1990 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Los Angeles is once again in throes of dubious delight, calling itself America's second-most important art center and waiting nervously for somebody to laugh. That last happened in the '60s when the town dawned on the world as a hot-rod hotbed for flashy contemporary art. By now a lot of folks tend to think that time was the genesis if not the exodus of the whole L.A. enchilada. It wasn't.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | LEO SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You were probably sitting there, twiddling your thumbs, thinking about nothing in particular, when some questions popped into your head: "Were there any modernist artists in Los Angeles? And if so, what impact did they have on the entire American art world and on the formation of Los Angeles as a city?' Well, you can stop twiddling.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1998 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a painting from the mid-1930s, a shirtless John Steinbeck kneels on the beach, poking moodily at a rock with a stick, utterly oblivious of the nude woman behind him who dries her long hair. As the waves move closer to shore and the sun hangs low in the summer sky, a couple embrace, a bearded man relaxes with a drink and a woman in a red dress strums her guitar.
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