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Henrik Ibsen

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May 24, 1998 | Diane Haithman, Diane Haithman is a Times staff writer
One Saturday afternoon, in a cavernous rehearsal space above a sporting goods store at San Diego's University Towne Centre shopping mall, Les Waters and Annie Smart watched a marriage fall apart. Waters, 46, and Smart, 45, are the director and costume/set designer, respectively, of the upcoming La Jolla Playhouse production of "Nora," Ingmar Bergman's 1981 stage adaptation of Henrik Ibsen's 1878 play "A Doll's House."
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2007 | David Ng;F. Kathleen Foley;David C. Nichols
Henrik Ibsen meets Douglas Sirk in the Luna Playhouse's gripping "A Doll House." This fine adaptation of Ibsen's drama moves the action to the 1950s and envisions its protagonist, Nora Helmer, as a repressed suburban housewife. In a marvelous performance, Georgan George probes Nora's complexity with searchlight intensity and ruthless precision. Using a translation by Rick Davis and Brian Johnston, the production moves at a brisk pace.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1997 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Henrik Ibsen's dramas were so far ahead of their time that it took decades to appreciate them fully. Now, a bit more than a century later, storefront theater companies put on his plays without a second thought. The Vanguard Theatre Ensemble either didn't realize what it was getting into with "Hedda Gabler," which is now on the boards there, or, perhaps more likely, thought it could master Ibsen's play despite scant resources.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2001 | LARKIN WARREN, Larkin Warren is a New York City freelance writer
Richard Burton's daughter has her father's blue eyes, her mother's indomitable spirit and (oddly) her stepmother's bordering-on-bawdy laugh. When Kate Burton laughs, a big, openhearted La Liz chortle ricochets around the room. Right up until Sept. 11 (in particular on Sept. 10, which was her birthday), Burton was laughing a lot--because life, she readily admits, was going along very nicely, thank you.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
It's easy to see why Henrik Ibsen provokes such schizophrenic responses. He's one of those turn-of-the-century writers that modern directors and actors profess to admire yet keep safely at arm's length. Most translations of Ibsen are hopelessly ponderous and many of the hidebound Victorian values aired in his plays become increasingly distant as we approach the 21st Century.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Henrik Ibsen's bearded Victorian face is projected on a screen--wearing the oval glasses that Oliver Peoples would later make de rigueur for the chic intellectual. He appears to watch as five actors tiptoe on stage, frequently startled by the sudden drama in the famous Grieg music. It's hard to imagine that this severe Norwegian could have, in 1867, written anything as wild and funny as the "Peer Gynt" that director David Schweizer has put onstage at the Actors' Gang.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
The struggle of women for recognition and equality seems as contemporary as the ERA but is, in truth, as old as gender itself, and Sappho, Boadicea and Joan of Arc. Down the decades the desires and the frustrations have been observed and enunciated by men as well as women. In modern times, Ingmar Bergman's "Scenes From a Marriage" caught poignantly the tugs and pride of rising consciousness and the thrust to liberation.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1990 | RAY LOYND
More than 100 years after Henrik Ibsen scalded callow, self-serving conformists in "An Enemy of the People," the play has been revived with surging, topical vitality in an Americanized adaptation by Arthur Miller. Dynamically directed by Jack O'Brien, with a burnished performance by John Glover as a heroic town doctor isolated by his zeal, the KCET production for "American Playhouse" is buoyant, even comically human. It airs tonight at 9 on Channels 28 and 15.
NEWS
June 30, 1995 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Robert Koehler writes regularly about theater for The Times
When he was Europe's most controversial playwright, Henrik Ibsen did not make things easy for the theater world. Critics, Bob Dole-like, accused him of corrupting public morals. Some theaters wanted nothing to do with him. Even late in his career, with the 1896 opening of "Little Eyolf," the London Evening Standard critic moaned that before the play's premiere "there had appeared good reason to hope that the English stage had seen the last of the morbid, melancholy and unwholesome dramas of Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2007 | David Ng;F. Kathleen Foley;David C. Nichols
Henrik Ibsen meets Douglas Sirk in the Luna Playhouse's gripping "A Doll House." This fine adaptation of Ibsen's drama moves the action to the 1950s and envisions its protagonist, Nora Helmer, as a repressed suburban housewife. In a marvelous performance, Georgan George probes Nora's complexity with searchlight intensity and ruthless precision. Using a translation by Rick Davis and Brian Johnston, the production moves at a brisk pace.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Shadowy, mellow, a little scary, Annette Bening's voice is a true instrument of cunning. Once the last shot has rung out in director Daniel Sullivan's cautious go at Henrik Ibsen's "Hedda Gabler" at the Geffen Playhouse, it's Bening's thrumming alto you remember. At her best--and, considering the 10-year gap between theatrical engagements, her best is very good--Bening uses her vocal instrument to fine effect, without throwing it around.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1998 | Diane Haithman, Diane Haithman is a Times staff writer
One Saturday afternoon, in a cavernous rehearsal space above a sporting goods store at San Diego's University Towne Centre shopping mall, Les Waters and Annie Smart watched a marriage fall apart. Waters, 46, and Smart, 45, are the director and costume/set designer, respectively, of the upcoming La Jolla Playhouse production of "Nora," Ingmar Bergman's 1981 stage adaptation of Henrik Ibsen's 1878 play "A Doll's House."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"Essays with legs" is how critic John Lahr described the plays of David Hare. Anyone who saw Hare's "Racing Demon," a commentary on corruption in the Anglican Church (which played the Doolittle in 1994), would probably agree. "Skylight," enjoying a superb production at the Mark Taper Forum, could also be described as an essay with legs, but only if you add that it moves around on them awfully well.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1997 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Henrik Ibsen's dramas were so far ahead of their time that it took decades to appreciate them fully. Now, a bit more than a century later, storefront theater companies put on his plays without a second thought. The Vanguard Theatre Ensemble either didn't realize what it was getting into with "Hedda Gabler," which is now on the boards there, or, perhaps more likely, thought it could master Ibsen's play despite scant resources.
NEWS
June 30, 1995 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Robert Koehler writes regularly about theater for The Times
When he was Europe's most controversial playwright, Henrik Ibsen did not make things easy for the theater world. Critics, Bob Dole-like, accused him of corrupting public morals. Some theaters wanted nothing to do with him. Even late in his career, with the 1896 opening of "Little Eyolf," the London Evening Standard critic moaned that before the play's premiere "there had appeared good reason to hope that the English stage had seen the last of the morbid, melancholy and unwholesome dramas of Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Henrik Ibsen's bearded Victorian face is projected on a screen--wearing the oval glasses that Oliver Peoples would later make de rigueur for the chic intellectual. He appears to watch as five actors tiptoe on stage, frequently startled by the sudden drama in the famous Grieg music. It's hard to imagine that this severe Norwegian could have, in 1867, written anything as wild and funny as the "Peer Gynt" that director David Schweizer has put onstage at the Actors' Gang.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1988 | Jan Herman
The plays of Henrik Ibsen have been called many things by his detractors--remote, stilted, melodramatic--but never timid. More than a century ago in "Ghosts," which opens Friday at the Alternative Repertory Theatre in Santa Ana, Ibsen scandalized Victorian audiences with his dramatization of such subjects as venereal disease. You never hear the word "syphilis" uttered in the play.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"Essays with legs" is how critic John Lahr described the plays of David Hare. Anyone who saw Hare's "Racing Demon," a commentary on corruption in the Anglican Church (which played the Doolittle in 1994), would probably agree. "Skylight," enjoying a superb production at the Mark Taper Forum, could also be described as an essay with legs, but only if you add that it moves around on them awfully well.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
It's easy to see why Henrik Ibsen provokes such schizophrenic responses. He's one of those turn-of-the-century writers that modern directors and actors profess to admire yet keep safely at arm's length. Most translations of Ibsen are hopelessly ponderous and many of the hidebound Victorian values aired in his plays become increasingly distant as we approach the 21st Century.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
The struggle of women for recognition and equality seems as contemporary as the ERA but is, in truth, as old as gender itself, and Sappho, Boadicea and Joan of Arc. Down the decades the desires and the frustrations have been observed and enunciated by men as well as women. In modern times, Ingmar Bergman's "Scenes From a Marriage" caught poignantly the tugs and pride of rising consciousness and the thrust to liberation.
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