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Henry Aaron

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SPORTS
February 8, 1987 | Jim Murray
If you were Henry Aaron, how would you like to be remembered? It's not that simple. On the face of it, you would say that Henry hit more home runs than any player in history. Ergo, he's indelibly linked with this feat. You think of Henry Aaron, you think of home runs. But, do you? Is Hank Aaron a metaphor for power hitting, overpowering excellence in any field? Do we say of a man "He's the Henry Aaron of chefs," for instance?
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OPINION
April 9, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Jackie Robinson changed baseball and the nation that loves it on April 15, 1947, when he became the first black player to walk onto a major league ball field. He changed Carl Erskine's life in March 1948, when Robinson, by then a Brooklyn Dodgers star, sought out the minor leaguer after watching him pitch and told him, "You're going to be with us real soon!" And so he was - they were teammates through much of he Dodgers' legendary 1950s. The Robinson biopic "42" is mostly about matters that happened before they met, but Erskine knows what happened afterward: He pitched and won the first Dodger game in L.A., retired in 1959 to his hometown in Indiana, and watched the nation gradually understand the life lessons he later wrote about in "What I Learned from Jackie Robinson.
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BUSINESS
May 16, 1989 | ELLIOTT ALMOND
Cito Gaston, named to replace Jimy Williams as the Toronto Blue Jays' interim manager for 10 days at most, deserves to become the team's permanent manager, Henry Aaron said Monday night. Gaston, who is not a candidate for the permanent manager position according to Toronto General Manager Pat Gillick, has been with the Blue Jays for more than a decade. Aaron, a roommate of Gaston's when they played together for the Atlanta Braves in 1967, believes Gaston deserves the chance.
SPORTS
January 22, 2012 | Mike DiGiovanna
Baseball royalty gathered Saturday at the Riviera Country Club, where 1,623 home runs in the form of Henry Aaron and Sadaharu Oh sat side by side in a cramped news conference room, the long-ball count swelling to 2,209 when Frank Robinson walked in a little late. Both Aaron, 77, and Oh, 71, in Los Angeles for a World Children's Baseball Fair 20th anniversary luncheon, were introduced as "home run kings," even though Oh, who used his trademark "flamingo" leg kick to hit 868 homers in Japan from 1959 to 1980, is the only crown-holder of the two. Aaron slugged 755 homers for Milwaukee and Atlanta from 1954 to 1976, surpassing Babe Ruth's record of 714 amid hate mail and death threats in 1974 and holding the top spot for 33 years.
NEWS
February 6, 1999 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton hailed baseball legend Henry Aaron on Friday night as "a great American" who overcame racism and overtook Babe Ruth 25 years ago to become the national pastime's home run leader. At a gala black-tie dinner attended by 1,600 celebrities, politicians, civil rights leaders and sports greats, the president helped celebrate Aaron's 65th birthday and the upcoming silver anniversary of his record-setting swing.
SPORTS
January 22, 1995 | Mike Downey
A tape is popped into a VCR. The man in the den sits directly in front of the television. Jimmy Carter is on screen, talking about him. Gerald Ford, talking about him. Jesse Jackson, talking about him. One after another after another. Thumb beneath his jaw, finger stroking his cheek, Henry Aaron has the best seat in the house. The next famous face and voice belong to Harry Belafonte, the singer and civil rights champion. Same as the others, talking about him.
SPORTS
January 22, 2012 | Mike DiGiovanna
Baseball royalty gathered Saturday at the Riviera Country Club, where 1,623 home runs in the form of Henry Aaron and Sadaharu Oh sat side by side in a cramped news conference room, the long-ball count swelling to 2,209 when Frank Robinson walked in a little late. Both Aaron, 77, and Oh, 71, in Los Angeles for a World Children's Baseball Fair 20th anniversary luncheon, were introduced as "home run kings," even though Oh, who used his trademark "flamingo" leg kick to hit 868 homers in Japan from 1959 to 1980, is the only crown-holder of the two. Aaron slugged 755 homers for Milwaukee and Atlanta from 1954 to 1976, surpassing Babe Ruth's record of 714 amid hate mail and death threats in 1974 and holding the top spot for 33 years.
SPORTS
December 6, 1988 | ROSS NEWHAN, Times Staff Writer
Baseball Commissioner Peter Ueberroth, delivering his final state-of-the-game address at the annual winter meetings, Monday cited growth and improvement in virtually all areas and said his only disappointment stemmed from the absence of minority hirings for the positions of general manager, field manager and media relations. Not everyone applauded Ueberroth's remarks.
SPORTS
August 26, 1987
Paul Molitor's pursuit of Joe DiMaggio's record 56-game hitting streak prompted Paul Daugherty of Newsday to query another record-seeker: Henry Aaron, who broke Babe Ruth's home run record on April 8, 1974. The greatest moment of Aaron's life? Try the worst. "That's the part of it I'll never forget. It's still more memorable than the home runs," said Aaron, referring to the resentment that he inspired by eclipsing the legendary Ruth. "Even now, I don't know how I handled it," he said.
OPINION
April 9, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Jackie Robinson changed baseball and the nation that loves it on April 15, 1947, when he became the first black player to walk onto a major league ball field. He changed Carl Erskine's life in March 1948, when Robinson, by then a Brooklyn Dodgers star, sought out the minor leaguer after watching him pitch and told him, "You're going to be with us real soon!" And so he was - they were teammates through much of he Dodgers' legendary 1950s. The Robinson biopic "42" is mostly about matters that happened before they met, but Erskine knows what happened afterward: He pitched and won the first Dodger game in L.A., retired in 1959 to his hometown in Indiana, and watched the nation gradually understand the life lessons he later wrote about in "What I Learned from Jackie Robinson.
SPORTS
November 17, 2007 | By Tim Reiterman, Greg Krikorian and Lance Pugmire, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
SAN FRANCISCO -- Internal political considerations and concern among federal prosecutors that their case against baseball star Barry Bonds might not be strong enough delayed his perjury and obstruction of justice indictment for more than a year, according to a former FBI official familiar with the case. During that year, Bonds completed his last season with the San Francisco Giants without the threat of a suspension and overtook baseball legend Henry Aaron to set the home run record.
SPORTS
August 15, 2007 | From the Associated Press
ATLANTA -- Hank Aaron's team paid tribute to baseball's new home-run king Tuesday night, but Aaron wasn't at Turner Field to congratulate Barry Bonds in person. Before the opener of a three-game series against the San Francisco Giants, the Atlanta Braves replayed the videotaped message from Aaron that was shown in San Francisco last week after Bonds hit his 756th homer. Aaron, a senior vice president with the Braves, was not at the game.
SPORTS
August 8, 2007 | Bill Shaikin, ON BASEBALL
SAN FRANCISCO -- For Hank Aaron, that's 755 home runs, and one save. Bless him. Baseball did not deserve his grace. On this night, Aaron saved the game he loved. Never has an athlete served as a better role model than Aaron did Tuesday, 32 years into retirement. He acted selflessly, with dignity and nobility, demonstrating to the commissioner and to all the world one can put aside personal feelings for the greater good. It might not rub off on Bud Selig, but it rubbed off on Barry Bonds.
SPORTS
January 16, 2005 | Bill Plaschke, Bill Plaschke can be reached at bill.plaschke@latimes.com. For more Plaschke columns, go to latimes.com/plaschke.
The circus is coming, and he knows it. "I can almost see it," Hank Aaron says with a chuckle. The circus is coming, the guy with clown arms leading the parade, accusations and suspicions trailing clumsily behind, and, Lord, does baseball need Hank Aaron. It needs his dignity in the stands when Barry Bonds swaggers through 755. It needs his integrity beside the plate when Bonds stalks through 756.
NEWS
February 6, 1999 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton hailed baseball legend Henry Aaron on Friday night as "a great American" who overcame racism and overtook Babe Ruth 25 years ago to become the national pastime's home run leader. At a gala black-tie dinner attended by 1,600 celebrities, politicians, civil rights leaders and sports greats, the president helped celebrate Aaron's 65th birthday and the upcoming silver anniversary of his record-setting swing.
SPORTS
September 9, 1997 | BILL PLASCHKE
He is the senior vice president and assistant to the president of the Atlanta Braves. Yet this summer, he has attended only two games. He was the sports world's most successful African American pioneer since Jackie Robinson. Yet this summer, when baseball honored the 50th anniversary of Robinson's debut, he did not show. He is the all-time leading producer of baseball's most exciting play--the home run. Yet these days, he says he doesn't even play catch with his grandchildren.
SPORTS
April 8, 1999 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 13-year major league career during which he was a four-time all-star wouldn't seem to have been a trivial pursuit, but in some ways that is what the career of Davey Johnson became. The Dodger manager takes delight in pointing out that he is the walking, talking answer to two of baseball's most renowned trivia questions. Clip and save: Question: Who was the last player to get a hit off Sandy Koufax before the celebrated Dodger left-hander retired?
SPORTS
May 11, 1997
Will Hank Aaron's home run record ever be broken? He still has a long way to go, but Ken Griffey Jr. is off to a pretty good start. *--* Player Most home runs at age 26 Total (Rank) Jimmie Foxx 266 534 (9th) Eddie Matthews 253 512 (12th) Mickey Mantle 249 536 (8th) Mel Ott 242 511 (14th) Frank Robinson 241 586 (4th) Ken Griffey Jr. 238 Orlando Cepeda 222 379 (33rd) Hank Aaron 219 755 (1st) Juan Gonzalez 214 Johnny Bench 212 389 (29th) *--*
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