Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHenry Armstrong
IN THE NEWS

Henry Armstrong

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
August 14, 1988 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
This is where the champ fights now. Down the green carpeted hallway past the nurses' station in the room on the left. The television set is on, but the champ doesn't see it. A vase of daisies, carnations and gladiolus is on the table next to the bed that brighten the hospital room with the sun splashing through the window. But he doesn't notice. This is one fight the champ can't win. There weren't many foes that Henry Armstrong couldn't lick in the ring, but his body is betraying him now.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 17, 1990
Al Manfredo, 73, a prominent welterweight fighter in the 1930s and '40s who fought Henry Armstrong for the world championship in 1939, died after a long illness of natural causes in Morro Bay.
Advertisement
SPORTS
January 14, 1988
Henry Armstrong, 75, former featherweight, welterweight and lightweight boxing champion, is in Century City Hospital, recuperating from prostate surgery.
SPORTS
October 25, 1988 | Jim Murray
They used to say of Henry Armstrong that he never threw a jab or took a backward step in his life. He'd be even money against a moving train. He'd charge a rhinoceros. He made his fight like a guy running for a bus. He walked through people like turnstiles. His manager, Eddie Mead, once summed up his fighting style as "he just kept hitting people till they disappeared." Henry came from a long line of people who suffered in this life, and he never expected anything but more of same.
SPORTS
October 24, 1988 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
Legendary fighter Henry Armstrong, the only man to hold championship belts in three weight divisions simultaneously, is dead at 75. Armstrong, who had been in poor health for nearly a year, died of heart failure early Saturday morning at California Medical Center where he had been brought from his South Central Los Angeles bungalow by paramedics, only 2 days after he had been released from another hospital.
SPORTS
October 25, 1988 | Jim Murray
They used to say of Henry Armstrong that he never threw a jab or took a backward step in his life. He'd be even money against a moving train. He'd charge a rhinoceros. He made his fight like a guy running for a bus. He walked through people like turnstiles. His manager, Eddie Mead, once summed up his fighting style as "he just kept hitting people till they disappeared." Henry came from a long line of people who suffered in this life, and he never expected anything but more of same.
SPORTS
November 6, 1987
After disposing of Juan Roldan to win his fourth world title, Thomas Hearns said, "I am ahead of all the boxers in the game." If you go by totals, he is. If you go by percentages, he isn't. In fact, he doesn't come close to Henry Armstrong. When Armstrong fought, there were eight weight classes and one champion in each. He won three titles and almost won a fourth, which would have given him half the titles available.
SPORTS
October 27, 1998
Most successful consecutive boxing title defenses: 1. Heavyweight Joe Louis 25 defenses 2. Welterweight Henry Armstrong 19 defenses 3. Junior featherweight Wilfredo Gomez 17 defenses 4. Middleweight Carlos Monzon 14 defenses 5. Light heavyweight Bob Foster 14 defenses 6. Super lightweight Julio Cesar Chavez 12 defenses 7. Lightweight Roberto Duran 12 defenses Source: World Features Syndicate
SPORTS
February 8, 1985
Lou Ambers, who twice held the world lightweight championship in the 1930s, died Thursday in Vancouver, Canada. He was 71. Ambers, who had a career record of 88-8-6, first won the title Sept. 3, 1936, with a 15-round decision over Tony Canzoneri in New York, avenging an earlier title-fight defeat. He lost the crown on a 15-round decision to Henry Armstrong Aug.17, 1938, in New York, but won it back Aug, 22, 1939, with a 15-round decision over Armstrong, again in New York.
SPORTS
October 24, 1988 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
Legendary fighter Henry Armstrong, the only man to hold championship belts in three weight divisions simultaneously, is dead at 75. Armstrong, who had been in poor health for nearly a year, died of heart failure early Saturday morning at California Medical Center where he had been brought from his South Central Los Angeles bungalow by paramedics, only 2 days after he had been released from another hospital.
SPORTS
August 14, 1988 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
This is where the champ fights now. Down the green carpeted hallway past the nurses' station in the room on the left. The television set is on, but the champ doesn't see it. A vase of daisies, carnations and gladiolus is on the table next to the bed that brighten the hospital room with the sun splashing through the window. But he doesn't notice. This is one fight the champ can't win. There weren't many foes that Henry Armstrong couldn't lick in the ring, but his body is betraying him now.
SPORTS
November 6, 1987
After disposing of Juan Roldan to win his fourth world title, Thomas Hearns said, "I am ahead of all the boxers in the game." If you go by totals, he is. If you go by percentages, he isn't. In fact, he doesn't come close to Henry Armstrong. When Armstrong fought, there were eight weight classes and one champion in each. He won three titles and almost won a fourth, which would have given him half the titles available.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|