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Henry Brant

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2002 | MARK SWED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We've heard a lot of Schoenberg this season. But we've heard very little of what he wrought. The composers he taught and influenced ranged from European Modernists to American film composers, from academics to the avant-garde, here and abroad. That legacy was ostensibly left to the CalArts New Century Players, the guest ensemble at the Los Angeles Philharmonic's Green Umbrella Concert on Monday night.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Music Critic
Henry Brant -- an American maverick composer who added the dimension of space to music by placing musicians in nooks and crannies of concert halls, on boats floating down the Amstel River in Amsterdam or arrayed throughout sports arenas -- has died. He was 94. The Pulitzer Prize-winning composer died Saturday at his home in Santa Barbara, according to associates. Brant's pieces were always events tailor-made for specific sites. A typical example was "500: Hidden Hemisphere," commissioned in 1992 by Lincoln Center in New York in honor of the 500th anniversary of Columbus' voyage to the New World.
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NEWS
September 26, 1991 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Henry Brant, the most celebrated contemporary composer to call Santa Barbara home, discovered space in 1950. His musical life has never been the same. Brant has spent the last four decades writing "spatial music," in which he sizes up a specific performance "space" and designs music around it. The time-honored frontal stage is meaningless to him, a stubborn anachronism.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Four works, all written since 2000, opened this season's first Green Umbrella concert by the Los Angeles Philharmonic New Music Group on Monday night. Three, exotic of sound and captivating, were by emerging young composers and dealt with time and place, with history. The fourth, and curiously the most timely, was concerned only with space and place. At 91, Henry Brant is focused on the here and now, and on the hear and now. He is a utopian who has pioneered individuality through spatial music.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2002 | MARK SWED
It would be a ridiculously tall order to expect composers to solve the overcrowded world's most pressing problems. But world leaders let us down when it comes to finding ways for different people with different ideas and means to get along. They clearly cannot or will not manage the planet's territory and resources to the benefit of all. Better, I say, to turn to the most thoughtful scholars, scientists, religious leaders and, especially, artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Four works, all written since 2000, opened this season's first Green Umbrella concert by the Los Angeles Philharmonic New Music Group on Monday night. Three, exotic of sound and captivating, were by emerging young composers and dealt with time and place, with history. The fourth, and curiously the most timely, was concerned only with space and place. At 91, Henry Brant is focused on the here and now, and on the hear and now. He is a utopian who has pioneered individuality through spatial music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Music Critic
Henry Brant -- an American maverick composer who added the dimension of space to music by placing musicians in nooks and crannies of concert halls, on boats floating down the Amstel River in Amsterdam or arrayed throughout sports arenas -- has died. He was 94. The Pulitzer Prize-winning composer died Saturday at his home in Santa Barbara, according to associates. Brant's pieces were always events tailor-made for specific sites. A typical example was "500: Hidden Hemisphere," commissioned in 1992 by Lincoln Center in New York in honor of the 500th anniversary of Columbus' voyage to the New World.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2002 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With composer Henry Brant's spatial music, "being there" is central to the art. That was an unstated message when his piece "Prophets" was given its U.S. premiere in Santa Barbara's First Methodist Church on Sunday. Listeners were literally surrounded by music, treated to the engaging, enigmatic sound of four cantors singing Old Testament texts in Hebrew in separate corners of the chapel, while the ceremonial Jewish horn called the shofar punctuated their incantations.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2002 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"In my head, I understand it all right, but the rest of me has just got the shakes." Henry Brant is standing in his frontyard late Monday afternoon. The 88-year-old composer, dressed, as usual, in color-coordinated sweats and a visor, has spent the day digesting this news: After years of laboring in the shadows of contemporary music, his most recently premiered commission, "Ice Field," won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for music. His wife, Kathy Wilkowski, standing next to him, shakes her head.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1992
A New Music Festival at UC Santa Barbara, scheduled Tuesday through Thursday, will offer three evening concerts, four free lectures, a composers panel and a tour of the UCSB Center for Computer Music Composition. Composers Robert Morris, William Kraft and Milton Babbitt and pianist Robert Taub are the lecturers, beginning Tuesday at 2 p.m. with Taub speaking on "The Piano as an Idiom." The Tuesday night concert will present music by Babbitt, Steven Stucky and Ciro Scotto.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2002 | MARK SWED
It would be a ridiculously tall order to expect composers to solve the overcrowded world's most pressing problems. But world leaders let us down when it comes to finding ways for different people with different ideas and means to get along. They clearly cannot or will not manage the planet's territory and resources to the benefit of all. Better, I say, to turn to the most thoughtful scholars, scientists, religious leaders and, especially, artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2002 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With composer Henry Brant's spatial music, "being there" is central to the art. That was an unstated message when his piece "Prophets" was given its U.S. premiere in Santa Barbara's First Methodist Church on Sunday. Listeners were literally surrounded by music, treated to the engaging, enigmatic sound of four cantors singing Old Testament texts in Hebrew in separate corners of the chapel, while the ceremonial Jewish horn called the shofar punctuated their incantations.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2002 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"In my head, I understand it all right, but the rest of me has just got the shakes." Henry Brant is standing in his frontyard late Monday afternoon. The 88-year-old composer, dressed, as usual, in color-coordinated sweats and a visor, has spent the day digesting this news: After years of laboring in the shadows of contemporary music, his most recently premiered commission, "Ice Field," won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for music. His wife, Kathy Wilkowski, standing next to him, shakes her head.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2002 | MARK SWED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We've heard a lot of Schoenberg this season. But we've heard very little of what he wrought. The composers he taught and influenced ranged from European Modernists to American film composers, from academics to the avant-garde, here and abroad. That legacy was ostensibly left to the CalArts New Century Players, the guest ensemble at the Los Angeles Philharmonic's Green Umbrella Concert on Monday night.
NEWS
September 26, 1991 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Henry Brant, the most celebrated contemporary composer to call Santa Barbara home, discovered space in 1950. His musical life has never been the same. Brant has spent the last four decades writing "spatial music," in which he sizes up a specific performance "space" and designs music around it. The time-honored frontal stage is meaningless to him, a stubborn anachronism.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1987 | JOHN HENKEN
Retrospectives often can embarrass us with an awareness of how easily we forget and neglect substantive works of real force and imagination. The first Bing Concert of the 1987-88 season, at the County Museum of Art on Wednesday, promised to do just that. But if Yvar Mikhashoff's survey of piano pieces complementing the "Machine Age in America 1918-1941" exhibit at the museum was representative, the era had little to offer but wind-up toys--quaint curiosities dusted off to amuse visitors.
NEWS
April 9, 2002 | Associated Press
JOURNALISM Public Service: The New York Times for "A Nation Challenged," a daily stand-alone section on terrorism and the war in Afghanistan. Breaking News Reporting: The Wall Street Journal staff for coverage of the Sept. 11 attacks under extremely difficult circumstances; its newsroom near the trade center was evacuated.
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