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Henry Cejudo

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January 9, 2010
American Victory Wrestling, Dreams, and a Journey Toward Home Henry Cejudo with Bill Plaschke Celebra: 240 pp., $24.95
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2010 | By Kevin Baxter
Anthonie Linares hasn't been to Mexico, doesn't speak Spanish and doesn't know the words to the Mexican national anthem. But as he stood in a tunnel beneath the Home Depot Center in Carson on Tuesday, with a pair of gold medals hanging around his neck, the 16-year-old from San Jose said he could imagine himself someday climbing atop the podium at a major international competition as a strange flag is raised and an incomprehensible anthem played....
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OPINION
August 24, 2008
Re "From humble beginnings, an American dream," Column, Aug. 20 Henry Cejudo demonstrates that when individual initiative, grit and determination are applied, great things can be accomplished. Imagine how this cherished moment could have easily been destroyed if we followed the race-baiting antics and dogma of some anti-immigration groups and other self-proclaimed protectors of the American way of life, who always seem to collectively place all immigrants (and especially those from Mexico)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2010
American Victory Wrestling, Dreams, and a Journey Toward Home Henry Cejudo with Bill Plaschke Celebra: 240 pp., $24.95
SPORTS
August 20, 2008 | Bill Plaschke
He has shared everything for most of his scuffled life, from twin beds to sofa cushions to last bites. It only made sense, then, that when he stunningly won an Olympic gold medal in freestyle wrestling Tuesday, the Los Angeles-born son of undocumented Mexican immigrants would also share. With his most beloved piece of cloth. The American flag. Oh, what a pair they made, young Henry Cejudo and Old Glory, dancing cloth-to-cheek across the floor of a gym that rocked and roared in disbelief.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2010 | By Kevin Baxter
Anthonie Linares hasn't been to Mexico, doesn't speak Spanish and doesn't know the words to the Mexican national anthem. But as he stood in a tunnel beneath the Home Depot Center in Carson on Tuesday, with a pair of gold medals hanging around his neck, the 16-year-old from San Jose said he could imagine himself someday climbing atop the podium at a major international competition as a strange flag is raised and an incomprehensible anthem played....
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2011
The Early Show (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Wrestler Henry Cejudo; 3 Doors Down; chef Lourdes Castro; Denise Richards; Jordin Sparks. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC KTLA Morning News (N) 7 a.m. KTLA Good Morning America Tori Spelling. (N) 7 a.m. KABC Good Day L.A. (N) 7 a.m. KTTV Live With Regis and Kelly SofĂ­a Vergara; OneRepublic performs. (N) 9 a.m. KABC The View Tom Bergeron. (N) 10 a.m. KABC The Talk Giuliana and Bill Rancic; chef Ludo Lefebvre. (N) 1 p.m. KCBS Dr. Phil A recovering addict and his mother return to try to help a young woman hooked on drugs.
SPORTS
March 5, 2011 | By Kevin Baxter
For Bernardo de la Garza, it's more about opening doors than crossing borders. For too many years, says De la Garza, general director of Mexico's national sports federation, his country has turned its back on U.S. athletes of Mexican heritage, only to watch the likes of boxer Oscar de la Hoya and wrestler Henry Cejudo win Olympic glory in the red, white and blue. "There wasn't a clear open door for athletes who wanted to represent Mexico," he said this week. "We're trying to open that door.
SPORTS
August 29, 2008 | Steve Springer
The Olympics may be fading into history, but the wake left by Michael Phelps and other athletes continues to bubble. Looking at comparisons In attracting 214 million viewers over 17 days, the 2008 Beijing Olympics were watched by more Americans than any event in U.S. television history. What about "Roots," the highest-rated miniseries of all time? The story of slavery in America attracted 80 million viewers for each of its first seven nights and 100 million for the final episode for a total of 660 million.
SPORTS
July 28, 2007 | PHILIP HERSH, From Times wire reports
A review of what happened during Friday's competition at Rio de Janeiro: Wrestling Weird rules, too much weight -- none of it threw Henry Cejudo, the newest U.S. freestyle wrestling star. Cejudo took the throwing into his own hands, winning the Pan American Games 121-pound gold medal Friday night over Cuba's Andy Moreno. A late takedown gave Cejudo, a Los Angeles native, the point necessary to win the decisive second period in a match where both periods ended in a tie.
OPINION
August 24, 2008
Re "From humble beginnings, an American dream," Column, Aug. 20 Henry Cejudo demonstrates that when individual initiative, grit and determination are applied, great things can be accomplished. Imagine how this cherished moment could have easily been destroyed if we followed the race-baiting antics and dogma of some anti-immigration groups and other self-proclaimed protectors of the American way of life, who always seem to collectively place all immigrants (and especially those from Mexico)
SPORTS
August 20, 2008 | Bill Plaschke
He has shared everything for most of his scuffled life, from twin beds to sofa cushions to last bites. It only made sense, then, that when he stunningly won an Olympic gold medal in freestyle wrestling Tuesday, the Los Angeles-born son of undocumented Mexican immigrants would also share. With his most beloved piece of cloth. The American flag. Oh, what a pair they made, young Henry Cejudo and Old Glory, dancing cloth-to-cheek across the floor of a gym that rocked and roared in disbelief.
SPORTS
July 15, 2007 | Kevin Baxter, Times Staff Writer
Andy Moreno had his American opponent right where he wanted him: out of position and seemingly out of luck. But when Moreno moved in for the kill only 10 seconds from victory, Henry Cejudo stunned the Cuban wrestler by flipping him on his back. "Pretty incredible," said Kevin Jackson, coach of the U.S. wrestling team. "He was down twice and dug down deep to come back."
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