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Henry Cho

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April 28, 1994 | GLENN DOGGRELL, Glenn Doggrell writes about comedy for The Times Orange County Edition
Tennessee native Henry Cho likes to tell audiences about growing up as the "only Asian guy in, like, four states" and how he hated playing army, because the teams were always the same: "All my buddies would go, 'OK, it's the neighborhood against you.' " But in retrospect, it wasn't such a bad deal. Cho, who headlines at the Irvine Improv through May 1, didn't know it at the time, but he was laying the groundwork for what would become a specialized niche in a highly successful stand-up career.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1998 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just when the stand-up comic has his nightclub audience in hysterics, the servers begin to deliver the checks. Suddenly, the electricity sputters as distracted patrons dig into wallets or discuss who owes what. When the inevitable happens, Henry Cho, who performs at the Irvine Improv from Thursday through Sunday, likes to take questions from the crowd.
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NEWS
January 13, 1994 | GLENN DOGGRELL, Glenn Doggrell writes about comedy for The Times Orange County Edition.
Much has been made about Henry Cho's unique niche in comedy: He's the only full-blooded Korean working the circuit who was born in Tennessee. He is also very funny, and that's what he prefers to dwell on. Which is why the first thing he does is address his audiences' slack-jawed stares. "Howdy. How y'all doin'?" Cho typically asks a crowd in his opening remarks. "I know what may be going through your mind right now.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1997 | GLENN DOGGRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For most performers who want to get into movies, the path is to Los Angeles. Very few stars get the call in Gallatin, Tenn. But for Henry Cho, the best move was back to his roots, his friends and his family. Things seem to be working out for the easygoing Cho, a Korean American who was born in the Volunteer State and who went into stand-up comedy in 1986 with the specific goal of getting into films. "I lived in Hermosa Beach for about six years," he recalled recently from his farm in Gallatin.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1992 | JON MATSUMOTO
Stand-up comedian Henry Cho was born and raised in Knoxville, Tenn. He played high school baseball and dated cheerleaders. Indeed, with his deep, east Tennessee drawl and down-home nature, he is very much the All-American Southern boy. However, Cho also happens to be a second-generation Korean-American. And when the 30-year-old funny man performs on stage, he's often faced with an incredulous audience. Most comedy clubgoers just can't seem to fathom how an Asian-American can talk like that.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Dennis McLellan is a Times staff writer who regularly writes about comedy for OC Live!
Rodney Dangerfield has his tie-tugging "I don't get no respect" image. Judy Tenuta has her accordion-toting "petite flower" persona. And comedian Henry Cho has his own gimmick: himself. "Howdy. How ya'll doin'?" the cowboy boot-clad Cho says in his heavy Southern drawl. "I know what may be goin' through your mind right now. Just let it soak in a second or two because there's something wrong with this picture, ain't there? I'm full-blooded Korean, but I was born in Knoxville, Tenn.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1993 | GLENN DOGGRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most comedians would kill for a good hook. Rodney gets no respect. Gallagher loves his watermelons. Roseanne is a domestic goddess. But for Henry Cho, his hook is also his cross to bear. He's a full-blooded Korean, born in Tennessee. And by his account, that makes him a South Korean, a rarity on the comedy circuit. "A lot of people say, 'You've got a great character.' Well, it's not a character; it's me," he told The Times earlier this year. "If I could, I'd just move on (and not do it)."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1998 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just when the stand-up comic has his nightclub audience in hysterics, the servers begin to deliver the checks. Suddenly, the electricity sputters as distracted patrons dig into wallets or discuss who owes what. When the inevitable happens, Henry Cho, who performs at the Irvine Improv from Thursday through Sunday, likes to take questions from the crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1997 | GLENN DOGGRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For most performers who want to get into movies, the path is to Los Angeles. Very few stars get the call in Gallatin, Tenn. But for Henry Cho, the best move was back to his roots, his friends and his family. Things seem to be working out for the easygoing Cho, a Korean American who was born in the Volunteer State and who went into stand-up comedy in 1986 with the specific goal of getting into films. "I lived in Hermosa Beach for about six years," he recalled recently from his farm in Gallatin.
NEWS
August 25, 1999
POETRY Drop by the Ugly Mug Cafe, 261 N. Glassell St., Orange, for a poetry reading. Tonight. 8. (714) 997-5610. COMEDY Comedian Henry Cho performs at the Irvine Improv, 4255 Campus Drive. Tonight. 8:30. (949) 854-5455. $12-$15. LECTURE Docents from the Long Beach Aquarium discuss programs they offer. Oak Canyon Nature Center, Anaheim Hills. 7 tonight. (714) 998-8380. Free. CHILDREN Gary Francisco presents an interactive Gold Rush musical show. Garden Grove Regional Library. Thursday. 3:30 p.m.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | GLENN DOGGRELL, Glenn Doggrell writes about comedy for The Times Orange County Edition
Tennessee native Henry Cho likes to tell audiences about growing up as the "only Asian guy in, like, four states" and how he hated playing army, because the teams were always the same: "All my buddies would go, 'OK, it's the neighborhood against you.' " But in retrospect, it wasn't such a bad deal. Cho, who headlines at the Irvine Improv through May 1, didn't know it at the time, but he was laying the groundwork for what would become a specialized niche in a highly successful stand-up career.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | GLENN DOGGRELL, Glenn Doggrell writes about comedy for The Times Orange County Edition.
Much has been made about Henry Cho's unique niche in comedy: He's the only full-blooded Korean working the circuit who was born in Tennessee. He is also very funny, and that's what he prefers to dwell on. Which is why the first thing he does is address his audiences' slack-jawed stares. "Howdy. How y'all doin'?" Cho typically asks a crowd in his opening remarks. "I know what may be going through your mind right now.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1993 | GLENN DOGGRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most comedians would kill for a good hook. Rodney gets no respect. Gallagher loves his watermelons. Roseanne is a domestic goddess. But for Henry Cho, his hook is also his cross to bear. He's a full-blooded Korean, born in Tennessee. And by his account, that makes him a South Korean, a rarity on the comedy circuit. "A lot of people say, 'You've got a great character.' Well, it's not a character; it's me," he told The Times earlier this year. "If I could, I'd just move on (and not do it)."
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Dennis McLellan is a Times staff writer who regularly writes about comedy for OC Live!
Rodney Dangerfield has his tie-tugging "I don't get no respect" image. Judy Tenuta has her accordion-toting "petite flower" persona. And comedian Henry Cho has his own gimmick: himself. "Howdy. How ya'll doin'?" the cowboy boot-clad Cho says in his heavy Southern drawl. "I know what may be goin' through your mind right now. Just let it soak in a second or two because there's something wrong with this picture, ain't there? I'm full-blooded Korean, but I was born in Knoxville, Tenn.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1992 | JON MATSUMOTO
Stand-up comedian Henry Cho was born and raised in Knoxville, Tenn. He played high school baseball and dated cheerleaders. Indeed, with his deep, east Tennessee drawl and down-home nature, he is very much the All-American Southern boy. However, Cho also happens to be a second-generation Korean-American. And when the 30-year-old funny man performs on stage, he's often faced with an incredulous audience. Most comedy clubgoers just can't seem to fathom how an Asian-American can talk like that.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1990 | MARK CHALON SMITH
Pat Hazell may do a little juggling here, some meager sleight-of-hand there, but his touchstone is the whimsical territory of stand-up comedy, often the gauzy region of being young and growing up. Hazell started roughly at the Improv on Tuesday (he headlines through Sunday), but that could have been because Henry Cho, the comic who preceded him, turned in such a solid set. Cho's sly work raised the ante, and Hazell may have felt the pressure.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2000
COSTA MESA 10am Theater Antoine de Saint-Exupery's "The Little Prince" must be the most cerebral children's story ever written: a tale of a lone aviator who crash-lands in the Sahara Desert and meets a mystical boy with a lifetime of experience in heaven and earth.
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