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Henry E Singleton

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BUSINESS
May 1, 1987 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Teledyne Inc., the Los Angeles-based conglomerate, has long held a fascination for Wall Street, which once again these days is trying to figure out what its enigmatic Chairman Henry E. Singleton will do next. Well, perhaps he gave a subtle clue at Teledyne's recent annual meeting, at which the company showed a film of Voyager's flight around the world, powered on a single tank of gas by an engine that got 500 miles to the gallon at 100 miles per hour.
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BUSINESS
September 5, 1999 | TOM PETRUNO
Henry Singleton, who died last week at age 82, knew a little bit about creating wealth. The Los Angeles conglomerate he co-founded in 1960, Teledyne Inc., once boasted the highest-priced stock on the New York Stock Exchange, after Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway. Investors who got in on the ground floor rode Teledyne stock from mere pennies to nearly $400 a share by the late 1980s. Even by today's Internet stock standards, that was astounding wealth creation.
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BUSINESS
February 12, 1993 | TOM PETRUNO
Henry E. Singleton built an empire of businesses across the aerospace, manufacturing and insurance fields in the 1970s and '80s. But at age 75, Singleton's primary occupation now is listed as "New Mexico rancher." And he has begun methodically deconstructing his billion-dollar corporate fiefdom.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1993 | TOM PETRUNO
Henry E. Singleton built an empire of businesses across the aerospace, manufacturing and insurance fields in the 1970s and '80s. But at age 75, Singleton's primary occupation now is listed as "New Mexico rancher." And he has begun methodically deconstructing his billion-dollar corporate fiefdom.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1999 | TOM PETRUNO
Henry Singleton, who died last week at age 82, knew a little bit about creating wealth. The Los Angeles conglomerate he co-founded in 1960, Teledyne Inc., once boasted the highest-priced stock on the New York Stock Exchange, after Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway. Investors who got in on the ground floor rode Teledyne stock from mere pennies to nearly $400 a share by the late 1980s. Even by today's Internet stock standards, that was astounding wealth creation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2013
. George A. Roberts Helped transform Teledyne Corp. George A. Roberts, 93, who was a pioneer in the field of steel manufacturing and helped turn the Southern California-based Teledyne Corp. into a Fortune 500 firm, died Feb. 15 of heart failure at a Dallas hospital, his family said. Trained as a metallurgist, Roberts became president of Teledyne in 1966 when the Pennsylvania company he ran was merged with Teledyne, which was founded by his friend Henry E. Singleton.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Teledyne named William P. Rutledge chief executive Monday, part of a management reshuffling in which company founder Henry E. Singleton retired as chairman. George A. Roberts, chief executive since 1986, was named chairman. Singleton, who founded the Los Angeles-based conglomerate in 1960, stepped down as Teledyne chief executive in 1986 and then retired as an employee of the company in 1989. Rutledge, 49, was named president in 1990 and continues to hold that title.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Teledyne Chairman Henry E. Singleton took the second step toward eventual retirement Wednesday when he announced at the firm's annual shareholders meeting that he will no longer participate in day-to-day management. In 1986, Singleton, 71, relinquished the title of chief executive to Teledyne President George A. Roberts, who has now been president under Singleton for 22 years. Even before that, Roberts had already taken over management of Teledyne's far-flung empire of small companies, while Singleton had turned his attention to the company's elaborate financial dealings.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1987 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Litton Industries' stock slipped Thursday as speculation subsided that its largest shareholder, Teledyne Inc., may unload its 27% stake and put Litton into play as a takeover candidate. Litton stock fell $2.875 per share to close at $103.125 in New York Stock Exchange trading Thursday, after rising $10.50 over the two previous days. The run-up was triggered in part by rumors that Los Angeles-based Teledyne and its secretive chairman, Henry E.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1986 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN
Teledyne Chairman Henry E. Singleton, who founded the Los Angeles-based conglomerate in 1960, said Wednesday that he will hand off his other title of chief executive to Teledyne President George A. Roberts. The move represents the first step toward Singleton's eventual retirement as Teledyne chairman and the succession of new management, said Robert Hanisee, an analyst at Seidler Amdec Securities, Los Angeles. Singleton is 69, and most of the firm's officers are over 65, Hanisee said.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1987 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Teledyne Inc., the Los Angeles-based conglomerate, has long held a fascination for Wall Street, which once again these days is trying to figure out what its enigmatic Chairman Henry E. Singleton will do next. Well, perhaps he gave a subtle clue at Teledyne's recent annual meeting, at which the company showed a film of Voyager's flight around the world, powered on a single tank of gas by an engine that got 500 miles to the gallon at 100 miles per hour.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1987 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
This week's stock market debacle has levied a hefty toll on the personal net worth of a flock of Los Angeles' wealthiest businessmen. For instance, 11 top executives at major area firms have lost more than $750 million in "paper" value of common stock they hold in their companies. That figure is drawn from an informal survey of big Southern California companies where either top executives or substantial owners have large stock holdings.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1996 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
WHX Corp., turning up the pressure on Teledyne Inc. to accept its unsolicited takeover attempt, on Monday raised its offer for the Los Angeles-based conglomerate to $1.78 billion. In lifting its bid to $32 from $30 for each of Teledyne's 55.7 million shares, WHX urged Teledyne to accept the sweetened price to preclude a proxy fight that WHX is also waging as a parallel effort to gain control of Teledyne.
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