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Henry Fok

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NEWS
January 18, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Henry Fok has one of the biggest fortunes in Hong Kong. His estimated net worth of $1.3 billion qualifies him for Fortune magazine's list of the richest men in the world, where he ranks above such wealthy Americans as Ted Turner and Jack Kent Cooke. Fok, 68, made his money by supplying China's Communist regime during the Korean War and the American-led trade embargo. Afterward, he branched out into shipbuilding, real estate and Macao gambling casinos.
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NEWS
January 18, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Henry Fok has one of the biggest fortunes in Hong Kong. His estimated net worth of $1.3 billion qualifies him for Fortune magazine's list of the richest men in the world, where he ranks above such wealthy Americans as Ted Turner and Jack Kent Cooke. Fok, 68, made his money by supplying China's Communist regime during the Korean War and the American-led trade embargo. Afterward, he branched out into shipbuilding, real estate and Macao gambling casinos.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1989 | ELIZABETH LU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here's the tempting offer from Hong Kong millionaire Henry Fok: He will pay half a million dollars to the first non-Chinese player to win a major tournament of Chinese chess. Fok, a successful businessman and avid player of Chinese chess who wants to promote the game, made the offer early last year, but no one has been able to claim the prize. Scott Yen of Alhambra hopes to change that. Yen, 38, an expert at Chinese chess, wants to discover and train the challenger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1989 | ELIZABETH LU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here's the tempting offer from Hong Kong millionaire Henry Fok: He will pay half a million dollars to the first non-Chinese player to win a major tournament of Chinese chess. Fok, a successful businessman and avid player of Chinese chess who wants to promote the game, made the offer early last year, but no one has been able to claim the prize. Scott Yen of Alhambra hopes to change that. Yen, 38, an expert at Chinese chess, wants to discover and train the challenger.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1985 | From Reuters
Hong Kong tycoon Henry Fok said Sunday that he would start a foundation with $130 million to help develop China, the New China News Agency said. Fok, a member of China's national political advisory body CPPCC, said the annual proceeds from the foundation would go to such projects as gymnasiums and hospitals and to finance overseas scholarships.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1996 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The small bookshop behind a row of makeshift fruit stalls is a gun lover's paradise. For pocket change, customers can buy glossy color photo albums and postcards of assorted automatic weapons--Israeli Uzis, Italian Berettas, Russian Kalashnikovs. One postcard shows a man in an FBI cap gripping a 100-round Calico machine pistol made in Bakersfield.
NEWS
April 22, 2002 | ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Wesley Pan sued his local government for the equivalent of 60 cents, it was clearly not just for the money. The five yuan toll allows Pan to drive from his home in the Panyu district over the Luoxi Bridge spanning a tributary of the Pearl River to his job as a lawyer in the bustling city of Guangzhou. Most other bridges into Guangzhou have paid off their loans and stopped collecting tolls long ago, so he wondered why there was still a charge for the Luoxi. He filed suit.
NEWS
December 11, 1996 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite his claims of being just a businessman and not a politician, shipping magnate Tung Chee-hwa won formal approval as Hong Kong's first post-colonial ruler today. As the 400 appointees of the Selection Committee--designated by Beijing to choose the chief executive--arrived at Hong Kong's glitzy convention center, demonstrators massed near the entrance protesting that the public had no vote.
NEWS
December 11, 1996 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shipping magnate Tung Chee-hwa--who is expected to be named Hong Kong's first post-colonial ruler today--thought until recently that he was unqualified for the job. Protesting that he was just a businessman and not a politician, and that he didn't understand the aspirations of Hong Kong's people, Tung, 59, waited until the last minute to declare himself a candidate to lead the territory after China reclaims it from the British on July 1.
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