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MAGAZINE
October 14, 2001 | RENEE VOGEL
For architecture fans who fancy their modernism in the round, the only surviving prototype of R. Buckminster Fuller's innovative Dymaxion House will soon be on display at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Mich. The 3-ton aluminum structure was conceived in the late 1920s and built in 1946, when it was unveiled as an affordable, tornado-resistant housing option for GIs returning from WWII, to be built by Beechcraft employees in Wichita, Kan.
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NEWS
July 16, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch
One by one, in auctions across the country, some of the world's most collectible cars are quietly passing from the Petersen Automotive Museum's vault into private hands. The sales started in March, and they include the automotive equivalents of a Pablo Picasso or a Salvador Dali. A 1995 Ferrari F50 went for $1.375 million. A 2006 Bugatti Veyron - the first sold in the U.S. - fetched $924,000. A 1990 Ferrari F40 garnered $715,000. Before the auctions end, the museum plans to liquidate nearly a third of its cache of about 400 classic cars.
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NEWS
February 26, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Henry Ford is best remembered for revolutionizing the automobile industry, but his passion for collecting Americana also is an important part of his legacy. Collecting was an obsession for Ford. Of particular interest to him were items that showed "how far and how fast we've come" from Colonial times to the 20th Century.
NATIONAL
October 13, 2009 | Richard Simon
To New York officials, the $3 million in federal economic stimulus funds they received to transform an old canal boat into a 259-foot-long floating museum was money well spent. "Its very presence on the canal brings new life to the waterfront," said Craig Williams, a historian at the New York State Museum. But to some in Washington, it's a symbol of pork-barrel excess that taxpayers can ill afford at a time of record budget deficits. "Should we build a museum when we have roads in disrepair?"
NEWS
July 16, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch
One by one, in auctions across the country, some of the world's most collectible cars are quietly passing from the Petersen Automotive Museum's vault into private hands. The sales started in March, and they include the automotive equivalents of a Pablo Picasso or a Salvador Dali. A 1995 Ferrari F50 went for $1.375 million. A 2006 Bugatti Veyron - the first sold in the U.S. - fetched $924,000. A 1990 Ferrari F40 garnered $715,000. Before the auctions end, the museum plans to liquidate nearly a third of its cache of about 400 classic cars.
NATIONAL
October 13, 2009 | Richard Simon
To New York officials, the $3 million in federal economic stimulus funds they received to transform an old canal boat into a 259-foot-long floating museum was money well spent. "Its very presence on the canal brings new life to the waterfront," said Craig Williams, a historian at the New York State Museum. But to some in Washington, it's a symbol of pork-barrel excess that taxpayers can ill afford at a time of record budget deficits. "Should we build a museum when we have roads in disrepair?"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2004 | Mike Conklin, Chicago Tribune
In the sparse, northwest corner of Oklahoma, Waynoka is a small (pop. 993), hard-pressed rural community actually winning the fight to preserve a local heritage once richer and more colorful. Its weapon is EBay. Sandie Olson, unpaid president of the Waynoka Historical Society, has gone online regularly for three years, doggedly pursuing collectibles related to the town's past as a U.S. transportation hub.
TRAVEL
September 20, 1998 | ELLEN MELINKOFF
Florida "Fantasy Fest" in Key West, from Oct. 23 to 31, mixes Mardi Gras and Halloween in dozens of high-spirited events. The theme this year is "Fright Night on Bone Island." The festival begins with a Caribbean celebration and ends with a Bloody Mary brunch. There are also a celebrity look-alike contest, adult trick-or-treating, street dances, beach parties and several costume parades. For more information, contact Fantasy Fest, P.O. Box 230, Key West, FL 33041; telephone (305) 296-1817.
TRAVEL
April 19, 1998 | ELLEN MELINKOFF
May Day is Lei Day with the biggest celebration taking place May 1 at Queen Kapiolani Park in Honolulu. Events include a children's lei-making contest, a concert by the Royal Hawaiian Band, Hawaiian arts and crafts for sale, hula performances and Hawaiian music. In late morning, the Lei Queen is crowned and homemade leis are judged. Contact the Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau, 5355 Mira Sorrento Place, Suite 100, San Diego, CA 92121; telephone (619) 536-8899.
NEWS
August 17, 1992
"They have contributed to our nation's intellectual vitality," Lynne V. Cheney, chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, said in announcing the 1992 winners of the Charles Frankel Prize. The prestigious award, which includes $5,000 for each recipient, honors Americans who have helped expand the public's understanding of history, literature, philosophy or other subjects in the humanities.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2004 | Mike Conklin, Chicago Tribune
In the sparse, northwest corner of Oklahoma, Waynoka is a small (pop. 993), hard-pressed rural community actually winning the fight to preserve a local heritage once richer and more colorful. Its weapon is EBay. Sandie Olson, unpaid president of the Waynoka Historical Society, has gone online regularly for three years, doggedly pursuing collectibles related to the town's past as a U.S. transportation hub.
MAGAZINE
October 14, 2001 | RENEE VOGEL
For architecture fans who fancy their modernism in the round, the only surviving prototype of R. Buckminster Fuller's innovative Dymaxion House will soon be on display at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Mich. The 3-ton aluminum structure was conceived in the late 1920s and built in 1946, when it was unveiled as an affordable, tornado-resistant housing option for GIs returning from WWII, to be built by Beechcraft employees in Wichita, Kan.
NEWS
February 26, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Henry Ford is best remembered for revolutionizing the automobile industry, but his passion for collecting Americana also is an important part of his legacy. Collecting was an obsession for Ford. Of particular interest to him were items that showed "how far and how fast we've come" from Colonial times to the 20th Century.
TRAVEL
February 24, 2002
Detroit today was scheduled to open an innovative, $1.2-billion airport terminal that serves as Northwest Airlines' biggest hub. The Edward H. McNamara Terminal claims to be the only airport with an elevated, enclosed tram in the terminal; it runs the mile-long length of the concourse. Eventually 80 restaurants and shops, including the Motown Music Review and gift shops for General Motors and the Henry Ford Museum, will be located there; about 65 were expected to be open by today.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
The Jetsons had one, and Fred MacMurray flew one in "Flubber. " Novelist Ian Fleming included one in his children's book "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. " James Bond's nemesis Francisco Scaramanga used one as a getaway vehicle in the film "The Man With the Golden Gun. " Now, a Massachusetts company hopes to commercially market a flying car — although "driving plane" might be a more accurate description. At last week's New York International Auto Show, Terrafugia Inc. of Woburn, Mass., unveiled the Transition, a two-seat aircraft with foldable wings.
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