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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Peter O'Toole's Broadway debut last week--as Henry Higgins in George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion"--has met with decidedly mixed reviews. The Associated Press' Mary Campbell said the British eccentric "puts his own, most satisfactory stamp on Henry Higgins." But Frank Rich, the New York Times critic, said that only the first half of the production is diverting, thanks mostly to O'Toole: "The tall, reedy actor rules this 'Pygmalion' on the grounds of elegance and talent, if not always concentration."
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By David Ng
With his eight-season residency at Fox's "House M.D. " now complete, Robert Sean Leonard is heading back to the theater in a new production of George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion" at the Old Globe in San Diego. Leonard will play the role of Henry Higgins in the play, which is scheduled to open Jan. 17. "Pygmalion" will be directed by Nicholas Martin and is set to run through Feb. 17. The rest of the cast hasn't been announced. Leonard previously appeared at the Globe nearly 20 years ago in a 1993 production of Shakespeare's "King Lear," starring Hal Holbrook.
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NEWS
May 7, 1989
Safety Last (Z Sunday at 10:30 a.m.): This is the dazzling 1923 Harold Lloyd silent comedy classic, which finds Lloyd climbing a downtown L.A. office building. (1:30) Pygmalion (Z Sunday at noon): The lively 1938 film of the Shaw play, with Wendy Hiller as Eliza Doolittle and Leslie Howard as Henry Higgins; Howard co-directed with Anthony Asquith. (1:35) Closely Watched Trains (Z Sunday at 2 p.m.): Jiri Menzel's 1966 Oscar winner, a wry, gentle coming-of-age film set in a small railway station near Prague during World War II. (1:30)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
To open the new season on its mainstage, South Coast Repertory chose an Old Reliable, "Pygmalion," the Cinderella story that George Bernard Shaw spiked with ideas about class, dignity and sexual equality. This "Pygmalion" has been outfitted with a visually arresting production--down to the straps on the women's fashionable shoes--but it is guided by a sensibility that seems content with window dressing, content to let the familiar be familiar.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By David Ng
With his eight-season residency at Fox's "House M.D. " now complete, Robert Sean Leonard is heading back to the theater in a new production of George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion" at the Old Globe in San Diego. Leonard will play the role of Henry Higgins in the play, which is scheduled to open Jan. 17. "Pygmalion" will be directed by Nicholas Martin and is set to run through Feb. 17. The rest of the cast hasn't been announced. Leonard previously appeared at the Globe nearly 20 years ago in a 1993 production of Shakespeare's "King Lear," starring Hal Holbrook.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1986 | ELISABETH GRAHAM
Golden West College has produced a spectacularly turned out "My Fair Lady," but it's a production that, although pleasing to the eye, offers little for the mind or heart. The lack of vitality here is especially disappointing because it's obvious that director William Purkiss wanted to put some new stripes on the venerable Alan Jay Lerner/Frederick Loewe adaptation of George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
To open the new season on its main stage, South Coast Repertory chose an Old Reliable--"Pygmalion," the Cinderella story that George Bernard Shaw spiked with ideas about class, dignity and sexual equality. This "Pygmalion" has been outfitted with a visually arresting production--down to the straps on the women's fashionable shoes--but it is guided by a sensibility that seems content with window dressing, content to let the familiar be familiar.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
To open the new season on its mainstage, South Coast Repertory chose an Old Reliable, "Pygmalion," the Cinderella story that George Bernard Shaw spiked with ideas about class, dignity and sexual equality. This "Pygmalion" has been outfitted with a visually arresting production--down to the straps on the women's fashionable shoes--but it is guided by a sensibility that seems content with window dressing, content to let the familiar be familiar.
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | ANN CONWAY
"All I want is a room somewhere, far away from the cold night air, with one enormous chair, oh, wouldn't it be loverly?" --Eliza Doolittle in "My Fair Lady." Wouldn't it? Wasn't it! There were plenty of rooms--elegant and flower-filled--at the "My Fair Lady" gala staged by Opera Pacific in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday night. And nobody had to worry about cold night air. With temperatures hovering in the 70s, there wasn't any. As for enormous chairs, well, there are too many to count in Art and Gaye Birtcher's French style-manse.
MAGAZINE
September 4, 1994 | Edna O'Brien, Novelist and short story writer Edna O'Brien, whose work appears frequently in New Yorker, lives in Ireland. Her most recent novel is "House of Splendid Isolation," published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux
"Just you wait, Henry Higgins, just you wait," Eliza Doolittle says, advancing the threat of equality, or maybe even superiority, over her cranky mentor, Professor Higgins. Everyone I know is waiting, and almost everyone I know would like to rebut it, since it is slightly demeaning, reeks of helplessness and shows we are not fully in command ourselves. Of course, we are not. In his book on Jean Genet, Sartre says, "To Be is to belong to someone."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
To open the new season on its main stage, South Coast Repertory chose an Old Reliable--"Pygmalion," the Cinderella story that George Bernard Shaw spiked with ideas about class, dignity and sexual equality. This "Pygmalion" has been outfitted with a visually arresting production--down to the straps on the women's fashionable shoes--but it is guided by a sensibility that seems content with window dressing, content to let the familiar be familiar.
MAGAZINE
September 4, 1994 | Edna O'Brien, Novelist and short story writer Edna O'Brien, whose work appears frequently in New Yorker, lives in Ireland. Her most recent novel is "House of Splendid Isolation," published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux
"Just you wait, Henry Higgins, just you wait," Eliza Doolittle says, advancing the threat of equality, or maybe even superiority, over her cranky mentor, Professor Higgins. Everyone I know is waiting, and almost everyone I know would like to rebut it, since it is slightly demeaning, reeks of helplessness and shows we are not fully in command ourselves. Of course, we are not. In his book on Jean Genet, Sartre says, "To Be is to belong to someone."
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | ANN CONWAY
"All I want is a room somewhere, far away from the cold night air, with one enormous chair, oh, wouldn't it be loverly?" --Eliza Doolittle in "My Fair Lady." Wouldn't it? Wasn't it! There were plenty of rooms--elegant and flower-filled--at the "My Fair Lady" gala staged by Opera Pacific in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday night. And nobody had to worry about cold night air. With temperatures hovering in the 70s, there wasn't any. As for enormous chairs, well, there are too many to count in Art and Gaye Birtcher's French style-manse.
NEWS
May 7, 1989
Safety Last (Z Sunday at 10:30 a.m.): This is the dazzling 1923 Harold Lloyd silent comedy classic, which finds Lloyd climbing a downtown L.A. office building. (1:30) Pygmalion (Z Sunday at noon): The lively 1938 film of the Shaw play, with Wendy Hiller as Eliza Doolittle and Leslie Howard as Henry Higgins; Howard co-directed with Anthony Asquith. (1:35) Closely Watched Trains (Z Sunday at 2 p.m.): Jiri Menzel's 1966 Oscar winner, a wry, gentle coming-of-age film set in a small railway station near Prague during World War II. (1:30)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Peter O'Toole's Broadway debut last week--as Henry Higgins in George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion"--has met with decidedly mixed reviews. The Associated Press' Mary Campbell said the British eccentric "puts his own, most satisfactory stamp on Henry Higgins." But Frank Rich, the New York Times critic, said that only the first half of the production is diverting, thanks mostly to O'Toole: "The tall, reedy actor rules this 'Pygmalion' on the grounds of elegance and talent, if not always concentration."
NEWS
March 18, 1987 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Antonio Lopez, who liked to call himself the "Puerto Rican Henry Higgins" because of his ability to transform attractive women and one-dimensional drawings of high-fashion clothing into perfections of beauty, shape and detail, died Tuesday. Known in international fashion centers simply as "Antonio," he was 44 when he died at UCLA Medical Center.
NEWS
March 18, 1987 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Antonio Lopez, who liked to call himself the "Puerto Rican Henry Higgins" because of his ability to transform attractive women and one-dimensional drawings of high-fashion clothing into perfections of beauty, shape and detail, died Tuesday. Known in international fashion centers simply as "Antonio," he was 44 when he died at UCLA Medical Center.
NEWS
December 5, 1985 | MILES BELLER, Miles Beller is a Westwood free-lance writer. and
Foreign accents have been called spoken language's spice, tangy verbal flourishes that add bite to basic native stock of "normal" speech. Yet, for a great number of those who learn English as a second language, the best accent is no accent. What's considered colorful English to native Americans is often an embarrassment to the speaker, marking him as an outsider.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1986 | ELISABETH GRAHAM
Golden West College has produced a spectacularly turned out "My Fair Lady," but it's a production that, although pleasing to the eye, offers little for the mind or heart. The lack of vitality here is especially disappointing because it's obvious that director William Purkiss wanted to put some new stripes on the venerable Alan Jay Lerner/Frederick Loewe adaptation of George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion."
NEWS
December 5, 1985 | MILES BELLER, Miles Beller is a Westwood free-lance writer. and
Foreign accents have been called spoken language's spice, tangy verbal flourishes that add bite to basic native stock of "normal" speech. Yet, for a great number of those who learn English as a second language, the best accent is no accent. What's considered colorful English to native Americans is often an embarrassment to the speaker, marking him as an outsider.
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