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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2009 | Associated Press
Stephen Rubin, who resigned last month from Random House Inc., will be the president and publisher of Henry Holt and Co., where authors include Man Booker Prize winner Hilary Mantel and National Book Award finalist Greg Grandin. Rubin was the longtime head of the Broadway Doubleday division of Random House and published John Grisham, Pat Conroy and Dan Brown. Holt has released such popular books as Barbara Ehrenreich's "Nickel and Dimed," but is better known for pub- lishing more low-profile, literary titles, a direction that will change now, said John Sargent, chief executive of Macmillan, Holt's parent company.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2009 | Associated Press
Stephen Rubin, who resigned last month from Random House Inc., will be the president and publisher of Henry Holt and Co., where authors include Man Booker Prize winner Hilary Mantel and National Book Award finalist Greg Grandin. Rubin was the longtime head of the Broadway Doubleday division of Random House and published John Grisham, Pat Conroy and Dan Brown. Holt has released such popular books as Barbara Ehrenreich's "Nickel and Dimed," but is better known for pub- lishing more low-profile, literary titles, a direction that will change now, said John Sargent, chief executive of Macmillan, Holt's parent company.
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NEWS
February 4, 1990 | JOCELYN McCLURG, THE HARTFORD COURANT
Somewhat tongue-in-cheek, Richard Todd uses a crisp military metaphor to explain his mission as an independent imprint editor for Houghton Mifflin, the book publisher. "What I'm supposed to do is like the Marines: 'Give us a few good men,' " Todd says with a laugh in an interview in his office at New England Monthly magazine, where he is editor. "I'm supposed to find them a few good books."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2005 | Avedis Hadjian, Special to The Times
A Great Improvisation Franklin, France, and the Birth of America Stacy Schiff Henry Holt and Co.: 490 pp., $27.50 * "The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing," wrote the Greek poet Archilochus. British philosopher Isaiah Berlin said this means that, for all his slyness, the fox is defeated by the hedgehog's single-minded defense, and he divides thinkers into hedgehogs and foxes. Hedgehogs relate every act and idea to a central vision and system.
MAGAZINE
October 30, 1988 | Judith Sims
ACCENTS are the man-made portions of a design that, Fell writes, "establish the style of a garden more successfully than plants alone." If one has acreage and a significant trust fund, some of Fell's accents--gazebos, bridges, arbors and sculpture--are impressive and useful. For readers with smaller budgets, there are simple brick paths, garden seats and containers, all handsomely illustrated. This is one garden book in which the prose is as impressive as the photographs. ($27.50)
NEWS
December 27, 1996 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The best way to read this book is by the fire on a cold, wet winter day. You may doze from time to time. It doesn't matter. "A Place in Normandy" makes no particular demands on the reader. It is, rather, a comfortable book, of considerable charm. Its theme is a well-worn one: If you can't have your own house in picturesque Normandy (or Provence or Tuscany or the Cotswolds), read a book by someone who can. Insofar as this one has a plot, that's it.
MAGAZINE
May 7, 1989 | Sam Hall Kaplan
CRAFTSMANSHIP IS BACK in vogue, thanks in part to a heightened design consciousness, the historic preservation movement and, simply, the appreciation of materials lovingly wrought. As the authors note in an introduction that serves as an engagingly brief history of interior design, interest in craftsmanship has been cyclical and at present is a positive reaction of sorts against the standardization and mass production of recent decades. That stated, the authors methodically review craftsmanship by the medium--metal, paint, stone, and marble, tile, wood, plaster and glass.
NEWS
April 27, 2000 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER and $27.50, 375 pages, illustrated
A monster. A coward. Conceited, supercilious, arrogant, a hypocrite, self-delusional. Heartless. With these words, the Sunday Times of London recently fired another stabbing broadside at the just-deceased British novelist Patrick O'Brian. On his home soil, the once-obscure, then celebrated O'Brian has not been treated kindly--not in the final two years leading up to his death in Dublin in January and not in the weeks since.
BOOKS
February 8, 2004 | Marc Aronson, Marc Aronson is the author of "Witch-Hunt: Mysteries of the Salem Witch Trials" and "Sir Walter Ralegh and the Quest for El Dorado."
Why isn't there a great movie about Sir Walter Ralegh? His life had everything a star could want: Born a commoner, he fought, flattered and seduced his way through a byzantine court filled with great men to win the favor of England's greatest queen. Once he had money and power he devoted himself to establishing colonies in Ireland and America.
BOOKS
June 30, 1996 | Jeffrey Mousaieff Masson, Jeffrey Mousaieff Masson is author of "When Elephants Weep: The Emotional Life of Animals."
In "The Hidden Life of Dogs," Elizabeth Marshall Thomas asked what dogs want, and answered by saying that they want to be with other dogs. Rhoda Lerman, writing about a single breed--Newfoundlands--has come up with a different answer in "In the Company of Newfies: A Shared Life": They want to be with us. In fact, they really want to be us. I love both books because the authors have much in common: They love dogs and they write well.
BOOKS
February 8, 2004 | Marc Aronson, Marc Aronson is the author of "Witch-Hunt: Mysteries of the Salem Witch Trials" and "Sir Walter Ralegh and the Quest for El Dorado."
Why isn't there a great movie about Sir Walter Ralegh? His life had everything a star could want: Born a commoner, he fought, flattered and seduced his way through a byzantine court filled with great men to win the favor of England's greatest queen. Once he had money and power he devoted himself to establishing colonies in Ireland and America.
BOOKS
October 12, 2003 | Merle Rubin, Merle Rubin is a contributing writer to Book Review.
British novelist Hilary Mantel's strange and compelling memoir, "Giving Up the Ghost," spans half a century, from her early childhood in a small town on the fringes of England's rugged Peak District to the present. But rather than being a comprehensive account of the many facets of its author's eventful, productive and interesting life, "Giving Up the Ghost" focuses on two highly perplexing and troubling aspects of it.
BOOKS
June 1, 2003 | Jaroslaw Anders, Jaroslaw Anders is a writer and translator living in Washington, D.C., who often writes about Eastern and Central Europe.
The 21st century is not starting well: terrorism of an unprecedented brutality and scale, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, trillions of dollars poured into high-tech armaments, old conflicts festering and new ones springing up in the most unusual places, failed states run by contending warlords, crumbling international institutions and sudden animosities breaking up old allies. The dream of post-totalitarian, post-Cold War harmony has long faded away.
HEALTH
November 13, 2000 | SHARI ROAN
American women fear breast cancer. But surveys show they don't always do everything they can to minimize their risk of dying from it. This book by medical geneticist Patricia Kelly is an outstanding attempt to alter these conflicting forces. Kelly provides one of the most understandable and comprehensive explanations I've seen on why most women need not be afraid of the disease. She does this while encouraging prevention strategies such as regular mammograms after age 40 and breast self-exams.
HEALTH
October 23, 2000 | Jane E. Allen
Ruth Picardie, a writer and an editor, invited a nation along on her losing fight with breast cancer, and millions followed through her columns in England's Observer Life magazine. For those who never read those marvelously witty, funny and disarmingly frank looks at coping with approaching death, her husband has brought them together in this slim volume, along with her e-mails to friends and correspondence from readers touched by her writing.
NEWS
April 27, 2000 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER and $27.50, 375 pages, illustrated
A monster. A coward. Conceited, supercilious, arrogant, a hypocrite, self-delusional. Heartless. With these words, the Sunday Times of London recently fired another stabbing broadside at the just-deceased British novelist Patrick O'Brian. On his home soil, the once-obscure, then celebrated O'Brian has not been treated kindly--not in the final two years leading up to his death in Dublin in January and not in the weeks since.
BOOKS
December 2, 1990 | Donald E. Westlake, Westlake is a novelist and screenwriter. His most recent book is "Drowned Hopes" (Mysterious Press), and his latest screenplay adaptation is "The Grifters," due out next month.
Probably the worst thing that ever happened to George V. Higgins was success. When "The Friends Of Eddie Coyle" was published in 1972, it was that rarest of things under the sun, something new, and readers gobbled it up like the fresh taste it was. Unfortunately, however, Higgins wound up praised and remembered for the wrong accomplishment. What people saw was an ex-prosecutor who had listened to and was reporting on criminal speech in an excitingly different and realistic way.
NEWS
May 10, 1991 | JUDITH FREEMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There must be some unwritten law in the universe which says that, although mothers and daughters may love each other dearly, there will come a time when they turn, for at least some brief part of their lives, into bitter and contemptible enemies. English author Sara Maitland understands this phenomenon well. "Three Times Tables" is a richly imaginative story, a novel that can be viewed as a kind of fabulist feminist tale as well as a profoundly realistic exploration of one family.
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Suppose Anne Frank's diary didn't end with her arrest by the Nazis. Suppose, in Bergen-Belsen, she was able to have a further record of her experiences smuggled outside the barbed wire. Suppose these pages (scribbled, let's say, with the stub of a pencil on toilet paper and torn up camp posters) survived, unlike their youthful author.
BOOKS
January 26, 1997 | JERVIS ANDERSON, Jervis Anderson is the author of "This Was Harlem: A Cultural Portrait, 1900-1950" (Noonday/Farrar, Straus & Giroux)
Eddy L. Harris, an itinerant writer and observer, is not the first young African American to have been drawn "home" to Harlem, seeking to recapture the spirit of its glamorous past or desiring to forge within that community a strong sense of racial identity. Because of the enduring, at times deceptive, allure of Harlem, he will not be the last to be so drawn.
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