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Henry J Kaiser

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2003 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Long before Henry J. Kaiser's name became associated with health care, his empire spanned North America on sturdy legs of steel, cement and aluminum. He almost single-handedly laid the foundation for the West's industrial boom, along with one of the nation's largest nonprofit health maintenance organizations. Both ventures stemmed from his longtime motto: "Find a need and fill it."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2003 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Long before Henry J. Kaiser's name became associated with health care, his empire spanned North America on sturdy legs of steel, cement and aluminum. He almost single-handedly laid the foundation for the West's industrial boom, along with one of the nation's largest nonprofit health maintenance organizations. Both ventures stemmed from his longtime motto: "Find a need and fill it."
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BUSINESS
April 20, 1987
The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation has named Richard P. Cooley, chairman and CEO of Seattle-First National Bank, to its board of trustees. The foundation, based in Menlo Park, disburses $15 million per year for projects in health and medicine.
NATIONAL
October 8, 2009 | Janet Hook
As Democratic leaders prepare to bring healthcare legislation before the full House and Senate for votes this month, they soon must decide who will be taxed to pay for expanding coverage -- the wealthy or the insurance companies. Legislation emerging from the House would slap a surtax on upper-income people. But many Democrats, especially in the Senate, fear the political fallout over voting to raise anyone's income taxes. The most prominent Senate bill would impose a tax on insurance companies that provide expensive policies, sometimes dubbed "Cadillac" plans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2008 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
"Ladies," said Cookie Johnson, looking straight into the camera, her husband's arm draped across her shoulders. "Have you been tested . . . " " . . . for HIV?" finished Lakers basketball legend Earvin "Magic" Johnson. As the most prominent African American face of HIV, Johnson, who is now a businessman and philanthropist, has long used his fame to raise public awareness of the virus that causes AIDS.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The average cost of employer-sponsored health insurance for a U.S. family rose 5% this year to $13,375 while the inflation rate fell, a survey found. Workers paid a quarter of the tab, or $3,515, according to the annual poll of U.S. businesses by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Total premiums have risen 131% over 10 years, compared with 38% for wages and 28% for the overall inflation rate, Kaiser said.
NEWS
October 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Henry J. Kaiser Convention Center in downtown Oakland will end its yearlong moratorium--don't call it a ban--on rap concerts when Los Angeles rapper King T and three local groups appear at the facility on Nov. 21. Security will be tighter than in the past, and officials at other arenas with rap concerts coming up have similar plans. There have been several incidents of violence the last two years at rap concerts in the San Francisco Bay Area.
NEWS
November 11, 1991
Clay P. Bedford, 88, who joined industrialist Henry J. Kaiser in 1925 and over the next 50 years helped oversee the construction of the Bonneville and Grand Coulee dams and the Richmond, Calif., shipyard used in World War II, and the creation of the Kaiser-Frazer line of automobiles. He also served as special assistant to the U.S. secretary of defense and was director of defense mobilization from 1951 to 1953. His civic interests included St. Mary's College in Moraga, Calif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1998 | Washington Post
A national survey by the Washington Post, the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation and Harvard University shows that the American electorate is deeply religious and places spirituality high among its most prized values. Nearly seven in 10 people say religion is very important in their everyday lives, and 19% say it is the most important value. Just over 40% attend religious services at least once a week, and 36% say they pray several times a day.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hawaiians Happy With Mandated Health Coverage: Hawaiians are happier with their state's health care system than most Americans, according to a survey by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. The state of Hawaii requires almost all employers to provide health insurance, a type of plan that has met stiff resistance from small business in California. In addition, a state insurance program provides coverage to those not covered by employers or Medicaid.
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