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Henry Joost

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2010
Even as "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps" fictionalizes the collapsing of the global economy, the film "Inside Job" looks at the real story behind the economic crisis. Here's a look at that and four other documentaries of note this fall. "Catfish": Is all as it seems as Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman look at the age of social networking, following Schulman's brother Nev's new online relationship? Opening: Sept. 17. "Last Train Home": This Chinese documentary follows peasant workers on their annual migration home from the cities for the holidays and examines its impact on the family structure.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
When Jarrod Musselwhite, a 27-year-old single dad from rural Georgia, was feeling confused about his relationship with a girl he'd met online, there was one person he thought could help: an appealingly goofy New York photographer named Nev Schulman. Though an unlikely companion for the high-school-educated rocker, Schulman was no stranger to what Musselwhite was feeling. A protagonist of the controversial 2010 documentary "Catfish," Schulman had himself gone through a virtual romance that didn't turn out as expected.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
Even at their best, the films in the unlikely "Paranormal Activity" franchise are never exactly thrilling, but they have cannily managed to wring more scares out of empty rooms than previously thought possible. The newest film in the found-footage horror series, "Paranormal Activity 4," continues that tradition, picking up in story terms where the second film left off. (The third movie was set in the 1980s and hinted at the origins of the demon bedeviling an unfortunate family.) A brief recap of that film's finale - in which the possessed Katie (Katie Featherston)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
With Halloween around the corner, it's time once again for a new installment of the "Paranormal Activity" series. Like its found-footage forbears, "Paranormal Activity 4" chronicles one family's efforts to videotape the things going bump in the night in their home. According to many reviewers, however, it could mark the moment at which the franchise has run out of fresh ideas. In a measured review, The Times' Mark Olsen writes that, like its predecessors, the latest "Paranormal" film manages "to wring more scares out of empty rooms than previously thought possible.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2012 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"50/50" Summit, $26.99; Blu-ray, $30.49 The title of the dramedy refers to the odds of survival faced by young public-radio producer Adam Learner (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) after he's diagnosed with cancer. Adam tries to lean on a therapist (Anna Kendrick) and his best friend (Seth Rogen) for support, but because they're all from a generation trained to respond to situations with aloofness, timidity and/or snark, they're unprepared for potential tragedy. Will Reiser's script — based on his own experiences — is a little too shaggy, and director Jonathan Levine doesn't help matters by letting his cast improvise so freely.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
With Halloween around the corner, it's time once again for a new installment of the "Paranormal Activity" series. Like its found-footage forbears, "Paranormal Activity 4" chronicles one family's efforts to videotape the things going bump in the night in their home. According to many reviewers, however, it could mark the moment at which the franchise has run out of fresh ideas. In a measured review, The Times' Mark Olsen writes that, like its predecessors, the latest "Paranormal" film manages "to wring more scares out of empty rooms than previously thought possible.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman and Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
The third "Paranormal Activity" movie will spook its competitors at the box office this weekend. But it remains to be seen whether it can scare up more dollars than the franchise's second installment. "Paranormal Activity 3" is expected to collect $40 million to $45 million domestically, according to those who have seen pre-release audience surveys. Paramount Pictures, the studio releasing the movie, is predicting a softer debut of around $35 million. The second "Paranormal" film opened to $40.7 million on the same weekend last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik and Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
"Paranormal Activity 3" vanquished the box-office ghosts this weekend, taking in a whopping $54 million upon its premiere in the U.S., according to studio estimates. The other two new films in wide release this weekend, however, flopped. An expensive 3-D version of "The Three Musketeers" grossed a disappointing $8.8 million. And "Johnny English Reborn," a comedy starring British comedian Rowan Atkinson, did not resonate with American audiences. While the film is a hit overseas, it collected a weak $3.8 million in the U.S. this weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
When Jarrod Musselwhite, a 27-year-old single dad from rural Georgia, was feeling confused about his relationship with a girl he'd met online, there was one person he thought could help: an appealingly goofy New York photographer named Nev Schulman. Though an unlikely companion for the high-school-educated rocker, Schulman was no stranger to what Musselwhite was feeling. A protagonist of the controversial 2010 documentary "Catfish," Schulman had himself gone through a virtual romance that didn't turn out as expected.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2010 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
What if you met someone online and later found she wasn't whom she appeared to be? And what if the person she didn't appear to be turned out to be someone else entirely? That situation — with its attendant moral questions, narrative challenges, and headache-inducing implications — is at the heart of "Catfish," a social-media meditation and mystery from first-time filmmakers Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman. The movie, which caused a sensation at this year's Sundance Film Festival and was released Friday in Los Angeles by the genre label Rogue Pictures, could become a touchstone for the Facebook age. And it seems certain to stir passionate discussion about the line between fact and fiction: Although its makers have strenuously defended the film as a documentary, skeptics question whether events so remarkable can also be truthful.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
Even at their best, the films in the unlikely "Paranormal Activity" franchise are never exactly thrilling, but they have cannily managed to wring more scares out of empty rooms than previously thought possible. The newest film in the found-footage horror series, "Paranormal Activity 4," continues that tradition, picking up in story terms where the second film left off. (The third movie was set in the 1980s and hinted at the origins of the demon bedeviling an unfortunate family.) A brief recap of that film's finale - in which the possessed Katie (Katie Featherston)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2012 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"50/50" Summit, $26.99; Blu-ray, $30.49 The title of the dramedy refers to the odds of survival faced by young public-radio producer Adam Learner (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) after he's diagnosed with cancer. Adam tries to lean on a therapist (Anna Kendrick) and his best friend (Seth Rogen) for support, but because they're all from a generation trained to respond to situations with aloofness, timidity and/or snark, they're unprepared for potential tragedy. Will Reiser's script — based on his own experiences — is a little too shaggy, and director Jonathan Levine doesn't help matters by letting his cast improvise so freely.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik and Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
"Paranormal Activity 3" vanquished the box-office ghosts this weekend, taking in a whopping $54 million upon its premiere in the U.S., according to studio estimates. The other two new films in wide release this weekend, however, flopped. An expensive 3-D version of "The Three Musketeers" grossed a disappointing $8.8 million. And "Johnny English Reborn," a comedy starring British comedian Rowan Atkinson, did not resonate with American audiences. While the film is a hit overseas, it collected a weak $3.8 million in the U.S. this weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Paranormal Activity 3," the latest installment in the low-budget horror franchise, is far and away the sharpest, most wildly aware film in the series. Directors Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman, known for their controversial Sundance film "Catfish," are working from the same essential bones as the previous two "Paranormal" movies — a family suspects a threatening, supernatural presence has invaded their home, and so they begin to videotape themselves around the clock in hopes of capturing proof.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman and Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
The third "Paranormal Activity" movie will spook its competitors at the box office this weekend. But it remains to be seen whether it can scare up more dollars than the franchise's second installment. "Paranormal Activity 3" is expected to collect $40 million to $45 million domestically, according to those who have seen pre-release audience surveys. Paramount Pictures, the studio releasing the movie, is predicting a softer debut of around $35 million. The second "Paranormal" film opened to $40.7 million on the same weekend last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2010 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
What if you met someone online and later found she wasn't whom she appeared to be? And what if the person she didn't appear to be turned out to be someone else entirely? That situation — with its attendant moral questions, narrative challenges, and headache-inducing implications — is at the heart of "Catfish," a social-media meditation and mystery from first-time filmmakers Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman. The movie, which caused a sensation at this year's Sundance Film Festival and was released Friday in Los Angeles by the genre label Rogue Pictures, could become a touchstone for the Facebook age. And it seems certain to stir passionate discussion about the line between fact and fiction: Although its makers have strenuously defended the film as a documentary, skeptics question whether events so remarkable can also be truthful.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Paranormal Activity 3," the latest installment in the low-budget horror franchise, is far and away the sharpest, most wildly aware film in the series. Directors Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman, known for their controversial Sundance film "Catfish," are working from the same essential bones as the previous two "Paranormal" movies — a family suspects a threatening, supernatural presence has invaded their home, and so they begin to videotape themselves around the clock in hopes of capturing proof.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The life, height and dozens of dots of John Baldessari are the subject of a six-minute video, aptly titled, "A Brief History of John Baldessari," which has been newly posted online. The video, narrated by singer Tom Waits (apparently at Baldessari's request, "he's got a great voice," the artist deadpans in the video), was commissioned by Los Angeles County Museum of Art for its  "Art + Film Gala" last year honoring Baldessari and Clint Eastwood. The short, directed by Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman ("Catfish")
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2010
Even as "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps" fictionalizes the collapsing of the global economy, the film "Inside Job" looks at the real story behind the economic crisis. Here's a look at that and four other documentaries of note this fall. "Catfish": Is all as it seems as Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman look at the age of social networking, following Schulman's brother Nev's new online relationship? Opening: Sept. 17. "Last Train Home": This Chinese documentary follows peasant workers on their annual migration home from the cities for the holidays and examines its impact on the family structure.
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