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Henry June Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1990 | JACK MATHEWS, TIMES FILM EDITOR
The controversy over the Motion Picture Assn. of America's new NC-17 adults-only rating prompted sell-out crowds in many theaters showing Universal Pictures' "Henry & June" and turned out protesters at two Orange County theaters. "Henry & June," the first movie to carry the MPAA's new rating, grossed an estimated $850,000 at 76 theaters across the country, a hefty per-screen average of more than $11,000. Theaters locally reported several sold-out screenings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1990 | PAT H. BROESKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fall moviegoing season got a lift from 20th Century Fox's new action film, "Marked for Death," which took in $10.5 million in opening weekend business. It's the third film to star newcomer Steven Seagal, who once served as super-agent Michael Ovitz's martial arts instructor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major hurdle in testing the effectiveness of the Motion Picture Assn. of America's new NC-17 adults-only movie rating was cleared Thursday when the New York Times issued a new policy accepting advertising for all MPAA-rated films, providing the ads themselves are in good taste.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1990 | JACK MATHEWS, TIMES FILM EDITOR
The controversy over the Motion Picture Assn. of America's new NC-17 adults-only rating prompted sell-out crowds in many theaters showing Universal Pictures' "Henry & June" and turned out protesters at two Orange County theaters. "Henry & June," the first movie to carry the MPAA's new rating, grossed an estimated $850,000 at 76 theaters across the country, a hefty per-screen average of more than $11,000. Theaters locally reported several sold-out screenings.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1990 | JACK MATHEWS
The humidity inside the screening room at the Motion Picture Assn. of America's headquarters in Sherman Oaks must have reached tropical hothouse levels when the movie ratings board members assembled recently to view Philip Kaufman's "Henry & June." If the sexual content in "Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!" put beads of sweat on their furrowed brows, this one might have caused a complete meltdown.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
Last week, Universal screened "Henry & June," Philip Kaufman's already controversial film about Henry Miller, his wife, June, and writer Anais Nin in Paris in 1931. The purpose of the screening was less for reviews, as such, than to engender sympathy for the film's struggle against its X rating and in favor of an R rating without trims.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1990 | JACK MATHEWS
As the controversy over the Motion Picture Assn. of America's movie ratings system edges toward a potentially noisy showdown on Oct. 3, the date of Universal Pictures' appeal of the X rating given Phil Kaufman's "Henry & June," a new enemy--or at least a new player--has moved into the frame.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The yanking of the adult-rated "Henry & June" from a suburban Boston movie theater before it even opened was characterized as "an isolated situation" on Friday by the movie's distributor, Universal Pictures. "Henry & June," the first movie to carry the Motion Picture Assn. of America's new NC-17 (no children younger than 17 admitted) rating, opened in 31 markets Friday, but a theater in Dedham, Mass. gave in to pressure from city officials this week and agreed not to show it.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1990 | PAT H. BROESKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fall moviegoing season got a lift from 20th Century Fox's new action film, "Marked for Death," which took in $10.5 million in opening weekend business. It's the third film to star newcomer Steven Seagal, who once served as super-agent Michael Ovitz's martial arts instructor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1990 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A small demonstration against the new NC-17 film rating erupted into a scuffle Friday night when a man who had come to see the movie "Henry and June," the first film to receive the new rating, got into a fight with a demonstrator. The two men fell to the sidewalk, wrestling and shouting, outside the Edwards Bristol Street Cinemas on the 3700 block of South Bristol about 7:25 p.m. The fight was over by the time two police cars arrived a few minutes later.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The yanking of the adult-rated "Henry & June" from a suburban Boston movie theater before it even opened was characterized as "an isolated situation" on Friday by the movie's distributor, Universal Pictures. "Henry & June," the first movie to carry the Motion Picture Assn. of America's new NC-17 (no children younger than 17 admitted) rating, opened in 31 markets Friday, but a theater in Dedham, Mass. gave in to pressure from city officials this week and agreed not to show it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1990 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A small demonstration against the new NC-17 film rating erupted into a scuffle Friday night when a man who had come to see the movie "Henry and June," the first film to receive the new rating, got into a fight with a demonstrator. The two men fell to the sidewalk, wrestling and shouting, outside the Edwards Bristol Street Cinemas on the 3700 block of South Bristol about 7:25 p.m. The fight was over by the time two police cars arrived a few minutes later.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many of America's leading publications and television outlets are still reviewing their policies regarding the acceptability of ads for movies carrying the Motion Picture Assn. of America's new NC-17 rating, but there has apparently been no reluctance to run ads promoting Universal Pictures' "Henry & June."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1990 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its most tender moments, Philip Kaufman's "Henry & June" has a hushed, lyrical grace. The dreamy, modish sensuality is an almost perfect filmic equivalent to Anais Nin's poetic reveries and reminiscences in her unexpurgated diary, published posthumously in 1986, on which the film is largely based. Despite the film's advance reputation as an erotic meltdown, its eroticism is far more suggestive than explicit.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major hurdle in testing the effectiveness of the Motion Picture Assn. of America's new NC-17 adults-only movie rating was cleared Thursday when the New York Times issued a new policy accepting advertising for all MPAA-rated films, providing the ads themselves are in good taste.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
Last week, Universal screened "Henry & June," Philip Kaufman's already controversial film about Henry Miller, his wife, June, and writer Anais Nin in Paris in 1931. The purpose of the screening was less for reviews, as such, than to engender sympathy for the film's struggle against its X rating and in favor of an R rating without trims.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1990 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its most tender moments, Philip Kaufman's "Henry & June" has a hushed, lyrical grace. The dreamy, modish sensuality is an almost perfect filmic equivalent to Anais Nin's poetic reveries and reminiscences in her unexpurgated diary, published posthumously in 1986, on which the film is largely based. Despite the film's advance reputation as an erotic meltdown, its eroticism is far more suggestive than explicit.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many of America's leading publications and television outlets are still reviewing their policies regarding the acceptability of ads for movies carrying the Motion Picture Assn. of America's new NC-17 rating, but there has apparently been no reluctance to run ads promoting Universal Pictures' "Henry & June."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1990 | JACK MATHEWS
As the controversy over the Motion Picture Assn. of America's movie ratings system edges toward a potentially noisy showdown on Oct. 3, the date of Universal Pictures' appeal of the X rating given Phil Kaufman's "Henry & June," a new enemy--or at least a new player--has moved into the frame.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1990 | JACK MATHEWS
The humidity inside the screening room at the Motion Picture Assn. of America's headquarters in Sherman Oaks must have reached tropical hothouse levels when the movie ratings board members assembled recently to view Philip Kaufman's "Henry & June." If the sexual content in "Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!" put beads of sweat on their furrowed brows, this one might have caused a complete meltdown.
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