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Henry Kaufman

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BUSINESS
April 30, 1993 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. economy will continue to grow faster than that of any other nation, including Japan and European countries, economist Henry Kaufman told an Irvine audience Wednesday. That's because the United States is well ahead of other countries, he said, in business restructuring and financial rehabilitation. "Five or six years ago, to say the economic growth of the U.S. would be better than the rest of the industrialized world would have been a surprising statement," he said.
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BOOKS
July 9, 2000 | JAMES J. CRAMER, James J. Cramer, a money manager in New York, is co-founder of TheStreet.com. During the 1980s he worked at Goldman Sachs in securities sales
Economics, like politics, has its apostles of hope and its apostles of worry. There are those who pursue policies meant to benefit the commonweal and those who believe only in the sanctity of credit itself and the paper that gets backed by it. The former believe that easy credit creation benefits most people and should be pursued. The latter fret that too much easy money could create inflation and, ultimately, a debasement of private capital.
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BOOKS
August 17, 1986 | Gardner Ackley, Ackley (now retired) was chairman, U.S. Council of Economic Advisers, and professor of economics, University of Michigan. and
These two rather slender books overlap considerably in subject matter. Both analyze how financial markets operate, with considerable attention to what is new and changing about these operations, and what these changes may imply for public policies, here and abroad. Although both books are intended for a general audience rather than for academic specialists, both could be somewhat hard going for the financial novice. The author of the first, Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1997
In response to "Words to a Prisoner of Hatred" by Al Martinez, Sept. 23: Martinez criticized the wonderful speech made at a POW outreach program by George Maness, who received a standing ovation from men who knew what he was talking about. Martinez wants the whole world to feel as he does. It would be a waste of time to invite him to the Westwood VA on any Monday morning to watch a session conducted by a great psychiatrist, Dr. Calvin Frederick. There are usually 20 to 30 ex-POWs, from all wars, present.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1997
In response to "Words to a Prisoner of Hatred" by Al Martinez, Sept. 23: Martinez criticized the wonderful speech made at a POW outreach program by George Maness, who received a standing ovation from men who knew what he was talking about. Martinez wants the whole world to feel as he does. It would be a waste of time to invite him to the Westwood VA on any Monday morning to watch a session conducted by a great psychiatrist, Dr. Calvin Frederick. There are usually 20 to 30 ex-POWs, from all wars, present.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1987 | From Reuters
Henry Kaufman, one of the country's top economists, on Thursday called for sweeping changes in U.S. regulation of financial institutions to cope with increasing turmoil in the financial system. "I feel very strongly that our financial system is going astray: Many deposit institutions are weak, and businesses and households have assumed massive debt burdens," Kaufman, managing director of the investment firm Salomon Bros., said in testimony before the Senate Banking Committee.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1989 | STAN HINDEN, The Washington Post
Henry Kaufman, one of Wall Street's leading economists, told the House Ways and Means Committee on Wednesday that, if leveraged buyouts are left unchecked, they will create a financial-industrial complex that will cause "a major upheaval in our economic and financial way of life."
BUSINESS
September 24, 1991 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration's top economic adviser acknowledged Monday that the economic recovery is going slowly but attributed it to the mildness of the past recession. The remarks by Michael Boskin, chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers, opening the annual convention of the National Assn. of Business Economists in Los Angeles, mirrored the results of an association survey finding that nearly 80% of the nation's economic forecasters said the recession ended in the second quarter.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1987
Henry Kaufman and Allen Sinai, two of Wall Street's best-known economists and market gurus, are giving up their current posts at major investment firms. Salomon Bros. announced Wednesday that Kaufman, whose gloomy forecasts in the early 1980s earned him the nickname "Dr. Doom," would leave early next year to form his own consulting firm. Kaufman is currently a managing director, senior economist and head of research at Salomon Bros.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1993 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. economy will continue to grow faster than that of any other nation, including Japan and European countries, economist Henry Kaufman told an Irvine audience Wednesday. That's because the United States is well ahead of other countries, he said, in business restructuring and financial rehabilitation. "Five or six years ago, to say the economic growth of the U.S. would be better than the rest of the industrialized world would have been a surprising statement," he said.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1991 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration's top economic adviser acknowledged Monday that the economic recovery is going slowly but attributed it to the mildness of the past recession. The remarks by Michael Boskin, chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers, opening the annual convention of the National Assn. of Business Economists in Los Angeles, mirrored the results of an association survey finding that nearly 80% of the nation's economic forecasters said the recession ended in the second quarter.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1989 | STAN HINDEN, The Washington Post
Henry Kaufman, one of Wall Street's leading economists, told the House Ways and Means Committee on Wednesday that, if leveraged buyouts are left unchecked, they will create a financial-industrial complex that will cause "a major upheaval in our economic and financial way of life."
BUSINESS
December 17, 1987
Henry Kaufman and Allen Sinai, two of Wall Street's best-known economists and market gurus, are giving up their current posts at major investment firms. Salomon Bros. announced Wednesday that Kaufman, whose gloomy forecasts in the early 1980s earned him the nickname "Dr. Doom," would leave early next year to form his own consulting firm. Kaufman is currently a managing director, senior economist and head of research at Salomon Bros.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1987 | From Reuters
Henry Kaufman, one of the country's top economists, on Thursday called for sweeping changes in U.S. regulation of financial institutions to cope with increasing turmoil in the financial system. "I feel very strongly that our financial system is going astray: Many deposit institutions are weak, and businesses and households have assumed massive debt burdens," Kaufman, managing director of the investment firm Salomon Bros., said in testimony before the Senate Banking Committee.
BOOKS
July 9, 2000 | JAMES J. CRAMER, James J. Cramer, a money manager in New York, is co-founder of TheStreet.com. During the 1980s he worked at Goldman Sachs in securities sales
Economics, like politics, has its apostles of hope and its apostles of worry. There are those who pursue policies meant to benefit the commonweal and those who believe only in the sanctity of credit itself and the paper that gets backed by it. The former believe that easy credit creation benefits most people and should be pursued. The latter fret that too much easy money could create inflation and, ultimately, a debasement of private capital.
NEWS
November 21, 1988
The government must soon raise taxes by up to $20 billion to avoid further erosion of the dollar and higher interest rates, Wall Street economist Henry Kaufman said. Kaufman, appearing on NBC-TV's "Meet the Press," said that if President-elect George Bush remained firmly opposed to any tax increase, " . . .
BOOKS
August 17, 1986 | Gardner Ackley, Ackley (now retired) was chairman, U.S. Council of Economic Advisers, and professor of economics, University of Michigan. and
These two rather slender books overlap considerably in subject matter. Both analyze how financial markets operate, with considerable attention to what is new and changing about these operations, and what these changes may imply for public policies, here and abroad. Although both books are intended for a general audience rather than for academic specialists, both could be somewhat hard going for the financial novice. The author of the first, Dr.
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