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Henry Labalme

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1997 | MARINA DUNDJERSKI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As millions of Americans prepare to tune into television's sweeps programming tonight, one tiny nonprofit group here plans to create some static for the television industry. TV-Free America, financed by private donations, is holding its third National TV-Turnoff Week today through Wednesday, just as the industry May ratings sweeps are getting underway.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1997 | MARINA DUNDJERSKI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As millions of Americans prepare to tune into television's sweeps programming tonight, one tiny nonprofit group here plans to create some static for the television industry. TV-Free America, financed by private donations, is holding its third National TV-Turnoff Week today through Wednesday, just as the industry May ratings sweeps are getting underway.
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NEWS
April 20, 1997 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What do parents really want to do about TV? Do they like the TV industry's age-based ratings to help them guard against objectionable programs? Or do they, as a coalition of child advocates, health and education professionals contend, prefer content labels? Or would they rather employ a media literacy strategy--watching with the kids and explaining every dramatic exaggeration, sexual innuendo and commercial manipulation they encounter? Or do they just want to turn the whole thing off?
NEWS
June 8, 1997 | JANET KINOSIAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's hand-wringing and an uneasiness among today's parents when they open their children's closets and see department stores staring back. As America's children become madcap shoppers--led on by a maelstrom of commercials, peer pressure, increased disposable income and parental consumerism--the debate is on about just what is driving youngsters to become little Donald Trumps and how to curb them.
NEWS
June 8, 1997 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Writer David Shenk is not an avid sports fan, but he tuned in for the final minutes of this year's Masters golf tournament to watch Tiger Woods' celebrated victory. Shenk also noticed something else--apparel. "There was a series of close-up shots of all the finalists," he said, "and every single guy was wearing a big baseball cap with a logo of whatever company was sponsoring him." He found it depressing.
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