Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHenry Lewin
IN THE NEWS

Henry Lewin

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
December 23, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Henri Lewin, the president of the Sands Hotel, recently threw a party for an old friend. He figured he owed his old friend for past favors. His life, for one. His old friend is Max Schmeling, the former heavyweight boxing champion, now 84. In 1938, Henri Lewin was a 14-year-old German Jew, hiding in the Berlin apartment of Germany's best-known athlete. Lewin, until recently, hadn't talked about the experience publicly because his old friend hadn't wanted him to.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
December 23, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Henri Lewin, the president of the Sands Hotel, recently threw a party for an old friend. He figured he owed his old friend for past favors. His life, for one. His old friend is Max Schmeling, the former heavyweight boxing champion, now 84. In 1938, Henri Lewin was a 14-year-old German Jew, hiding in the Berlin apartment of Germany's best-known athlete. Lewin, until recently, hadn't talked about the experience publicly because his old friend hadn't wanted him to.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1990 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State medical authorities have charged a Panorama City obstetrician with not rendering proper care to a patient who delivered a stillborn baby in a hospital hallway. The 28-year-old woman, identified in legal documents only as Hilda A., delivered a dead boy "in a precipitous manner" on March 10, 1988, while lying on a gurney in a hall at Granada Hills Community Hospital, officials said. Dr. Lee S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1989 | JACK CHEEVERS, Times Staff Writer
State medical authorities have disciplined a Van Nuys doctor charged with responsibility for inappropriate injections given to a middle-aged gangrene patient who later died. Medical officials also revoked the license of a Sun Valley doctor who allegedly prescribed heavy amounts of drugs to people with no symptoms and falsely certified them as ill so they could collect state disability payments. The California Board of Medical Quality Assurance decided earlier this month to place Dr. Frank J.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a near-empty courtroom here, the biggest medical sexual-abuse case in California history came to an unexpectedly abrupt end on Tuesday. Dr. Ivan C. Namihas, a Tustin gynecologist accused of about 50 instances of alleged sexual abuse of his patients, declined to appear at his court hearing to defend himself, clearing the way for permanent revocation of his right to practice medicine in California.
SPORTS
March 8, 1990 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawyers who have followed developments in the Hank Gathers case say they see several key elements in any litigation that might result from the death of the college basketball star. Gathers, a Loyola Marymount athlete under medical treatment for an irregular heartbeat, collapsed during a game at Gersten Pavilion Sunday night and was pronounced dead 1 hour 40 minutes later at Daniel Freeman Marina Hospital.
NEWS
March 14, 1992 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Tustin gynecologist accused of sexually molesting or improperly treating at least 140 patients over a 30-year period was ordered to stop practicing medicine Friday by a commissioner who concluded he was a danger to the public. Orange County Superior Court Commissioner Eleanor M. Palk granted a temporary restraining order that shuts down Dr. Ivan C. Namihas' practice pending another hearing April 22.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1995 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been six years since a computer monitoring the rate at which doctors prescribe narcotics kicked out the name of Dr. Stephen Cech. But the disciplinary hearing for the Westlake Village general practitioner, who was sanctioned for writing fraudulent prescriptions and using drugs in 1980, will not be held until next March. Cech is accused of dramatically overprescribing Demerol, methadone and tranquilizers for four patients, at least one of whom, state regulators say, still may be addicted.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|