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SPORTS
January 24, 1991 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Henry Marsh, the U.S. record-holder in the 3,000-meter steeplechase and a four-time Olympian, Wednesday had his two-year suspension from competition revoked by the American Arbitration Assn. Marsh, 36, was suspended early last year by The Athletics Congress, the governing body for track and field in the United States, for failing to make himself available for a drug test under TAC's year-round random drug-testing program. Marsh appealed twice within TAC, losing both times.
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SPORTS
September 26, 1990 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unprecedented decision, the U.S. Olympic Committee has joined with Henry Marsh, a four-time Olympian, in filing for arbitration to seek reversal of a two-year suspension levied last April by The Athletics Congress. TAC, the national governing body of track and field, suspended Marsh after he failed to report for a drug test in December of 1989. Failure to provide a sample in TAC's year-round, out-of-competition testing program is cause for a two-year suspension.
SPORTS
July 3, 1988 | Associated Press
Henry Marsh, running his final race at Hayward Field, pulled ahead with 80 meters to go to win the 3,000-meter steeplechase Saturday at the Prefontaine track and field meet, a final tuneup for the U.S. Olympic Trials. Marsh, the 34-year-old American record-holder and eight-time national champion, was back in the pack most of the race. But he pulled into contention on the backstretch, took the lead from Kregg Einspahr on the final hurdle and won in 8 minutes 34.
SPORTS
July 11, 1985 | Associated Press
Olympic gold medalist Joaquim Cruz of Brazil, in his first European race of the year, won the 800 meters at Wednesday's international track and field meet. Cruz won the tight race in 1 minute 45.41 seconds, beating Peter Braun of West Germany by 32-hundredths of a second and Eugene Sanders of the United States by 58-hundredths. Joseph Mahmoud of France, although saying before the event that he was shooting for a world record in the 3,000-meter steeplechase, settled for second place, 1.
SPORTS
January 24, 1991 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Henry Marsh, the U.S. record-holder in the 3,000-meter steeplechase and a four-time Olympian, Wednesday had his two-year suspension from competition revoked by the American Arbitration Assn. Marsh, 36, was suspended early last year by The Athletics Congress, the governing body for track and field in the United States, for failing to make himself available for a drug test under TAC's year-round random drug-testing program. Marsh appealed twice within TAC, losing both times.
SPORTS
September 8, 1988 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
One child answers the front door and three others peer from behind it. Jimmy, the oldest and, apparently, the bravest, steps from behind the door and guns down the visitor with his toy rifle. Ra-ta-ta-ta-tat . Another reporter bites the dust. Shrieks of laughter. Not from the children, who lost interest in their victim moments after winning the Battle of the Entry Hall. No, it is their father, that grown up little boy, Henry Marsh, America's best steeplechaser for what seems like forever.
SPORTS
April 27, 1990 | MAL FLORENCE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Athletics Congress, sensitive about published reports that it was banning athletes for taking cold medicines, Thursday defended its drug-testing procedures. In a 1 1/2-hour conference call with members of the media, TAC officials said, in essence, athletes' ignorance of banned substances, even in common over-the-counter medicines, is not a legitimate excuse. Three world-class athletes--Larry Myricks, Greg Foster and Antonio McKay--have been suspended this year for three months.
SPORTS
September 26, 1990 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unprecedented decision, the U.S. Olympic Committee has joined with Henry Marsh, a four-time Olympian, in filing for arbitration to seek reversal of a two-year suspension levied last April by The Athletics Congress. TAC, the national governing body of track and field, suspended Marsh after he failed to report for a drug test in December of 1989. Failure to provide a sample in TAC's year-round, out-of-competition testing program is cause for a two-year suspension.
SPORTS
April 27, 1990 | MAL FLORENCE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Athletics Congress, sensitive about published reports that it was banning athletes for taking cold medicines, Thursday defended its drug-testing procedures. In a 1 1/2-hour conference call with members of the media, TAC officials said, in essence, athletes' ignorance of banned substances, even in common over-the-counter medicines, is not a legitimate excuse. Three world-class athletes--Larry Myricks, Greg Foster and Antonio McKay--have been suspended this year for three months.
SPORTS
September 8, 1988 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
One child answers the front door and three others peer from behind it. Jimmy, the oldest and, apparently, the bravest, steps from behind the door and guns down the visitor with his toy rifle. Ra-ta-ta-ta-tat . Another reporter bites the dust. Shrieks of laughter. Not from the children, who lost interest in their victim moments after winning the Battle of the Entry Hall. No, it is their father, that grown up little boy, Henry Marsh, America's best steeplechaser for what seems like forever.
SPORTS
July 3, 1988 | Associated Press
Henry Marsh, running his final race at Hayward Field, pulled ahead with 80 meters to go to win the 3,000-meter steeplechase Saturday at the Prefontaine track and field meet, a final tuneup for the U.S. Olympic Trials. Marsh, the 34-year-old American record-holder and eight-time national champion, was back in the pack most of the race. But he pulled into contention on the backstretch, took the lead from Kregg Einspahr on the final hurdle and won in 8 minutes 34.
NEWS
July 28, 1985 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
The last thing Henry Marsh remembers about the race is falling. By the time he hit the Coliseum track, face first, just beyond the finish line for the Olympic 3,000 meter steeplechase, Marsh was out cold. It had been Marsh's dream to be carried off the track. But he wanted it to be in exultation rather than exhaustion. He wanted to be on top of somebody's shoulders, rather than on a stretcher. Marsh, the favorite to win the gold medal, left the Coliseum with a fourth-place finish and no medal.
NEWS
July 28, 1985 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
The last thing Henry Marsh remembers about the race is falling. By the time he hit the Coliseum track, face first, just beyond the finish line for the Olympic 3,000 meter steeplechase, Marsh was out cold. It had been Marsh's dream to be carried off the track. But he wanted it to be in exultation rather than exhaustion. He wanted to be on top of somebody's shoulders, rather than on a stretcher. Marsh, the favorite to win the gold medal, left the Coliseum with a fourth-place finish and no medal.
SPORTS
July 11, 1985 | Associated Press
Olympic gold medalist Joaquim Cruz of Brazil, in his first European race of the year, won the 800 meters at Wednesday's international track and field meet. Cruz won the tight race in 1 minute 45.41 seconds, beating Peter Braun of West Germany by 32-hundredths of a second and Eugene Sanders of the United States by 58-hundredths. Joseph Mahmoud of France, although saying before the event that he was shooting for a world record in the 3,000-meter steeplechase, settled for second place, 1.
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