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Henry Miller

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July 25, 2010 | By Richard Rayner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In 1939, with Europe already sinking into World War II, 46-year-old Henry Miller left Paris, knowing that a cycle of his life had come to an end. As an expatriate in Paris he'd found his voice, and published the novels — "Tropic of Cancer," "Black Spring" and "Tropic of Capricorn" — which made his name. He'd had his legendarily steamy and dangerous affair with Anais Nin, and George Orwell had fired a salute on his behalf, hailing him as "a Whitman among the corpses." Miller, although banned in America, had arrived, and then, restless as ever, he accepted the invitation of another writer, his friend Lawrence Durrell, to visit Greece and the island of Corfu.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Barney Rosset, who died Tuesday at the age of 89, was the most important American publisher of the 20th century. Sure, he was part of a lineage; it's difficult to imagine Rosset doing what he did for more than 30 years at Grove Press without the example of James Laughlin at the seminal independent New Directions or (further afield) Jack Kahane at Paris' Obelisk Press. And yet Grove, which Rosset bought in 1951 for $3,000 and ran until 1985, remains the touchstone, the publisher most responsible for breaking down American literary puritanism, for defending the idea that art, that literature, is meant to unsettle us, that among its central purposes is to challenge the status quo. Look at the writers Rosset published: Henry Miller, Samuel Beckett, William S. Burroughs, Eugene Ionesco, Jean Genet, Malcolm X. Look at the books that he brought into the center of the culture: "Tropic of Cancer," "Waiting for Godot," "Naked Lunch," "Our Lady of the Flowers," "A Confederacy of Dunces," "Cain's Book.
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NEWS
July 27, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Emil White, artist and sidekick of author Henry Miller, died last week in his redwood cabin in Big Sur, friends said. He was 88. White's cabin was full of mementos of his lengthy friendship with Miller, the "grandfather of the sexual revolution" who also died at the age of 88 in 1980. White passed away in his sleep last Thursday after a long battle with Parkinson's disease. Friends said White's health had been deteriorating for the last several months.
WORLD
February 22, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
For Hoki Tokuda, the whole crazy affair was like an inside joke her ex-husband, the late author Henry Miller, would have found irresistible ? if it weren't all true. He was the literary satyr of his generation, a famously virile writer riding high on the U.S. publication of his latest scandalous novel, penning passionate letters to a woman nearly five decades his junior. He described his late-night longing for her: "I am truly at the end of my rope. I can't work, I can't sleep; my mind is on you perpetually, without let-up.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | From Associated Press
Author Henry Miller's original writings, some banned for decades in the United States on charges of obscenity, commanded as much as $40,250 from mostly private collectors at a Thursday auction. Letters, photographs and typed drafts comprised the works put up for sale by Miller's children at the Pacific Book Auction Gallery.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | JACK SMITH
This being the centenary of his birth, Henry Miller is being widely dissected and adulated in his absence by his literary heirs and those who claim to have basked in what Lawrence Clark Powell called "Millerlight." "Throughout the year," writes Ralph B. Sipper in Book Review, "various events and publications will celebrate the life and work of this most American of American authors who left the land of his birth in order to discover himself."
NEWS
September 5, 1988 | MILES CORWIN, Times Staff Writer
BIG SUR--The year was 1944. Henry Miller was living in a three-room shack on Beverly Glen Boulevard and he could not write. "He found no inspiration in Los Angeles at the time and was very frustrated," longtime friend Emil White said. "The people didn't inspire him, and the atmosphere of the city didn't inspire him." Miller visited a friend in Big Sur and was awed, he wrote later, by its "grandeur and eloquent silence." He immediately decided he had found a home.
NEWS
February 17, 1993 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Up in Big Sur, there's an art gallery where you can pick up a signed lithograph by Henry Miller for a couple thousand dollars or so. A one-page typewritten bio is on display along with the artwork just in case the collector has forgotten that Henry Miller was an author as well as an artist. "No, he's not the one who married Marilyn Monroe," the salesman is sometimes called upon to explain.
BOOKS
December 17, 1995 | RICHARD EDER
Andrew Carnegie financed libraries, and the Fords and Rockefellers financed foundations, but one of corporate America's more useful cultural benefactions was producing an heir to the Jones & Laughlin steel fortune. In the mid-1930s, young James Laughlin chose to forgo steel, take summers off from Harvard and spend them in Italy with the poet Ezra Pound. Pound ran what he called his Ezuversity for the benefit of this sole and promising adept.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | DAVID L. ULIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the UCLA Extension Literature Program hosts its "Henry Miller Centenary Celebration" Saturday, the guest of honor, who died in June, 1980, at the age of 88, will be a vibrant presence. "He'll be electronically present," says filmmaker Robert Snyder, whose three movies about the controversial writer--"The Henry Miller Odyssey," "Reflections on Writing" and "To Paint Is to Love Again"--are major components of the UCLA program.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2010 | By Richard Rayner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In 1939, with Europe already sinking into World War II, 46-year-old Henry Miller left Paris, knowing that a cycle of his life had come to an end. As an expatriate in Paris he'd found his voice, and published the novels — "Tropic of Cancer," "Black Spring" and "Tropic of Capricorn" — which made his name. He'd had his legendarily steamy and dangerous affair with Anais Nin, and George Orwell had fired a salute on his behalf, hailing him as "a Whitman among the corpses." Miller, although banned in America, had arrived, and then, restless as ever, he accepted the invitation of another writer, his friend Lawrence Durrell, to visit Greece and the island of Corfu.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2009
Rose Kaufman Screenwriter worked with her husband Rose Kaufman, 70, who co-wrote the screenplays for “The Wanderers” and "Henry & June" with her writer-director husband, Philip , died of cancer Monday at her home in San Francisco. The Kaufmans first collaborated on "The Wanderers," a 1979 coming-of-age gang drama set in the Bronx in the early 1960s. Based on the Richard Price novel, it was directed by Philip Kaufman. "Henry & June," an adaptation of Anaïs Nin's memoir of her love affair with Henry Miller and his wife, June, was the first movie to carry the Motion Picture Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2009
As lead singer of the alt-rock band Incubus, Brandon Boyd is at ease in a stadium full of screaming fans or painting alone in his kitchen. In between recording albums and touring, the Calabasas native has published two art books full of his sketches, paintings, poems, musings and other work. Last fall, his first solo exhibition, "Ectoplasm," was at Mr. Musichead Gallery in L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2007 | Josh Getlin
HIS eyesight and hearing are diminished and arthritis in both knees forces him to walk with two canes. At 84, Norman Mailer gropes for words that do not come so easily. He looks frail and vulnerable. But he's still in the ring, having just published "The Castle in the Forest" (Random House), a novel about Adolf Hitler's childhood that has drawn decidedly mixed reviews. As he sat recently in the living room of his handsome Brooklyn, N.Y.
BOOKS
December 22, 2002 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to the Book Review, is the author of "The Woman Who Laughed at God: The Untold History of the Jewish People."
Henry Miller, Happy Rock Brassai Translated from the French by Jane Marie Todd University of Chicago Press: 180 pp., $25 * The Medicine of Memory A Mexican Clan in California Alejandro Murguia University of Texas Press: 296 pp., $50, $22.95 paper * Henry Miller is remembered and celebrated for "Tropic of Cancer" and other works of literature condemned as pornography during his lifetime.
NEWS
February 19, 1998
"The Brave Wild Coast: A Year With Henry Miller," by Judson Crews, edited by Jefferson P. Selth (Dumont Press), re-creates 1945 for the author, whose poetry in later years would make him a cult hero of many college campuses and an important contributor to small press editions. At this point, nearing the end of World War II, he has thumbed and hiked his way to Big Sur, where he hopes to find himself and his inner poetry by association with the Big Name--Henry Miller.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1990 | JACK MATHEWS
The humidity inside the screening room at the Motion Picture Assn. of America's headquarters in Sherman Oaks must have reached tropical hothouse levels when the movie ratings board members assembled recently to view Philip Kaufman's "Henry & June." If the sexual content in "Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!" put beads of sweat on their furrowed brows, this one might have caused a complete meltdown.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Barney Rosset, who died Tuesday at the age of 89, was the most important American publisher of the 20th century. Sure, he was part of a lineage; it's difficult to imagine Rosset doing what he did for more than 30 years at Grove Press without the example of James Laughlin at the seminal independent New Directions or (further afield) Jack Kahane at Paris' Obelisk Press. And yet Grove, which Rosset bought in 1951 for $3,000 and ran until 1985, remains the touchstone, the publisher most responsible for breaking down American literary puritanism, for defending the idea that art, that literature, is meant to unsettle us, that among its central purposes is to challenge the status quo. Look at the writers Rosset published: Henry Miller, Samuel Beckett, William S. Burroughs, Eugene Ionesco, Jean Genet, Malcolm X. Look at the books that he brought into the center of the culture: "Tropic of Cancer," "Waiting for Godot," "Naked Lunch," "Our Lady of the Flowers," "A Confederacy of Dunces," "Cain's Book.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | From Associated Press
Author Henry Miller's original writings, some banned for decades in the United States on charges of obscenity, commanded as much as $40,250 from mostly private collectors at a Thursday auction. Letters, photographs and typed drafts comprised the works put up for sale by Miller's children at the Pacific Book Auction Gallery.
BOOKS
June 1, 1997
John Andrew Frederick, vocalist-guitarist, English professor: "Dear Dear Brenda: The Love Letters of Henry Miller to Brenda Venus," by Henry Miller (2.13.61 Publications). "I like the way Miller talks about having been a 'beggar for the greater part of his life.' That metaphor of an artist makes me, by turns, wince and laugh." **** Laura Oatman, architect: "Feng Shui: The Book of Cures," by Nancilee Wydra (Contemporary Books).
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