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Henry Rosmarin

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2001
Henry Rosmarin, 75, a Holocaust survivor who mesmerized audiences with his harmonica playing and stories of his imprisonment, died of cancer Tuesday in Van Nuys. Born in Poland, Rosmarin was 17 when he was captured by the Nazis and sent to a German concentration camp at Dyhernfurth. His life was saved by a harmonica, on which he had learned to play classical compositions when he was a boy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2001
Henry Rosmarin, 75, a Holocaust survivor who mesmerized audiences with his harmonica playing and stories of his imprisonment, died of cancer Tuesday in Van Nuys. Born in Poland, Rosmarin was 17 when he was captured by the Nazis and sent to a German concentration camp at Dyhernfurth. His life was saved by a harmonica, on which he had learned to play classical compositions when he was a boy.
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NEWS
May 13, 2001 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Another night lost to searing back pain. Henry Rosmarin, 75, managed only three hours of sleep. How will he muster the breath for these kids this morning? The teenagers have burst into his life at a time in which he expects no joy, in which days are tracked by doctors' appointments. He could not go back to their classroom and wheeze a few token bars from his harmonica--his instrument still. Four months earlier, he had told the students about a cold night in Nazi Germany, when he was their age.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Another night lost to searing back pain. Henry Rosmarin, 75, managed only three hours of sleep. How will he muster the breath for these kids this morning? The teenagers have burst into his life at a time in which he expects no joy, in which days are tracked by doctors' appointments. He could not go back to their classroom and wheeze a few token bars from his harmonica--his instrument still. Four months earlier, he had told the students about a cold night in Nazi Germany, when he was their age.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2009 | Gary Goldstein; Kevin Thomas; Glenn Whipp; Robert Abele
Any remembrance of Holocaust victims is, of course, a worthy endeavor and a historical priority. Thus, "As Seen Through These Eyes," Hilary Helstein's brief documentary, serves as another critical reminder of one of the world's most horrific periods, even if, cinematically, it's an affecting collection of stories and images in search of an actual center. Over the last decade, Helstein interviewed various Holocaust survivors (some of whom have since died) who recounted how they created art and music as a form of expression, control and diversion.
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