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Henry Roth

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June 27, 2010 | By Thane Rosenbaum, Special to the Los Angeles Times
An American Type A Novel Henry Roth W.W. Norton: 284 pp., $25.95 All novelists, despite the façade of fiction, are ultimately writing variations of their own stories. Surely their characters provide necessary cover, but there's always autobiography and memoir yelping in the background — "it's all true, the names have changed, but the emotions and memories are dead-on." Henry Roth, the first of the great Jewish American novelists of the 20th century, never concealed the background that shaped him or the emotions that often left him guilt-ridden and paralyzed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2010 | By Thane Rosenbaum, Special to the Los Angeles Times
An American Type A Novel Henry Roth W.W. Norton: 284 pp., $25.95 All novelists, despite the façade of fiction, are ultimately writing variations of their own stories. Surely their characters provide necessary cover, but there's always autobiography and memoir yelping in the background — "it's all true, the names have changed, but the emotions and memories are dead-on." Henry Roth, the first of the great Jewish American novelists of the 20th century, never concealed the background that shaped him or the emotions that often left him guilt-ridden and paralyzed.
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NEWS
October 18, 1995
Henry Roth, 89, who wrote the widely acclaimed novel "Call It Sleep" in 1934 and then fell into literary silence. The autobiographical novel described the pains of Jewish immigrant families on New York's Lower East Side. Although it did not sell well when it was published, the book sold more than 1 million copies in 33 printings when it was published in paperback in 1964. It had the distinction of becoming the first paperback to be reviewed on the front page of the New York Times Book Review.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2007 | Jan Stuart, Newsday
If you frequent romantic comedies, you are familiar with the Big Sprint. This is the climactic moment when a character comes to his senses and, as if propelled by Cupid's wings, runs halfway across town to reclaim the love he has so foolishly sabotaged. In the really scurvy rom-coms, the Big Sprint is generally followed by the Big Ovation, when the kissing couple is cheered on by a peanut gallery of strangers mystically united by the shared conviction that love is all you need.
NEWS
September 18, 1996 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"From Bondage" is the fictionalized memoir of the late and nearly legendary Henry Roth, an autobiographical novel that cracks and flashes with dangerous sexual passion and burning literary ambition in approximately equal measure. At the same time, "From Bondage" is a monumental literary achievement whose significance begins with the fact it was written and published at all.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2005 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
FEW novelists have drawn more directly on their own lives than Henry Roth, first in his powerful portrait of an immigrant family on New York's Lower East Side, "Call It Sleep" (1934), and much later, after decades of writer's block, in the four published novels of his even more overtly self-revelatory roman-fleuve, "Mercy of a Rude Stream." Why then do we need a biography? The same question occurred to the author of this one. A literary critic who's written on Camus, Steven G.
BOOKS
January 30, 1994 | GABRIEL MILLER, Gabriel Miller is chairman of the English Dept. at Rutgers University and is writing a book about film director Martin Ritt
The death of Daniel Fuchs on July 26, 1993, received little attention in the press. Fuchs himself was partially responsible for maintaining his position on the periphery of literary reputation. Approached by a young admirer, he remained shy about providing information about himself, suggesting that his life and work did not merit the fuss and attention.
NEWS
February 28, 1994 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For a man who has spent the greater part of his life in self-imposed exile, Henry Roth has an unusual number of friends. More than 150 people gathered on a recent Sunday afternoon in the airy sanctuary at Congregation Albert to pay tribute to the 88-year-old author on the publication of the first volume of his highly autobiographical new novel, "Mercy of a Rude Stream," out from St. Martin's Press in January.
BOOKS
October 29, 1995 | STEFAN KANFER
Henry Roth, who died Oct. 13, nearly lost his literary identity six decades earlier in the cross-fire between the Soviet Union and the independent mind. In 1934, the 28-year-old American radical published his first novel, "Call It Sleep," and found it praised as "promising" in most newspaper reviews. To Roth's Marxist friends, however, the novel's stream-of-consciousness narrative about Jewish immigrant families in New York City was counterrevolutionary and irrelevant.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2007 | Jan Stuart, Newsday
If you frequent romantic comedies, you are familiar with the Big Sprint. This is the climactic moment when a character comes to his senses and, as if propelled by Cupid's wings, runs halfway across town to reclaim the love he has so foolishly sabotaged. In the really scurvy rom-coms, the Big Sprint is generally followed by the Big Ovation, when the kissing couple is cheered on by a peanut gallery of strangers mystically united by the shared conviction that love is all you need.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2005 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
FEW novelists have drawn more directly on their own lives than Henry Roth, first in his powerful portrait of an immigrant family on New York's Lower East Side, "Call It Sleep" (1934), and much later, after decades of writer's block, in the four published novels of his even more overtly self-revelatory roman-fleuve, "Mercy of a Rude Stream." Why then do we need a biography? The same question occurred to the author of this one. A literary critic who's written on Camus, Steven G.
NEWS
September 18, 1996 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"From Bondage" is the fictionalized memoir of the late and nearly legendary Henry Roth, an autobiographical novel that cracks and flashes with dangerous sexual passion and burning literary ambition in approximately equal measure. At the same time, "From Bondage" is a monumental literary achievement whose significance begins with the fact it was written and published at all.
BOOKS
October 29, 1995 | STEFAN KANFER
Henry Roth, who died Oct. 13, nearly lost his literary identity six decades earlier in the cross-fire between the Soviet Union and the independent mind. In 1934, the 28-year-old American radical published his first novel, "Call It Sleep," and found it praised as "promising" in most newspaper reviews. To Roth's Marxist friends, however, the novel's stream-of-consciousness narrative about Jewish immigrant families in New York City was counterrevolutionary and irrelevant.
NEWS
October 18, 1995
Henry Roth, 89, who wrote the widely acclaimed novel "Call It Sleep" in 1934 and then fell into literary silence. The autobiographical novel described the pains of Jewish immigrant families on New York's Lower East Side. Although it did not sell well when it was published, the book sold more than 1 million copies in 33 printings when it was published in paperback in 1964. It had the distinction of becoming the first paperback to be reviewed on the front page of the New York Times Book Review.
NEWS
February 28, 1994 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For a man who has spent the greater part of his life in self-imposed exile, Henry Roth has an unusual number of friends. More than 150 people gathered on a recent Sunday afternoon in the airy sanctuary at Congregation Albert to pay tribute to the 88-year-old author on the publication of the first volume of his highly autobiographical new novel, "Mercy of a Rude Stream," out from St. Martin's Press in January.
BOOKS
January 30, 1994 | Kenneth Turan, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic
'Literary history and the present are dark with silences," Tillie Olsen wrote in her remarkable book on writers who ceased to write. "These are not natural silences, that necessary time for renewal, lying fallow, gestation, in the natural cycle of creation. The silences I speak of here are unnatural; the unnatural thwarting of what struggles to come into being, but cannot." Though he is mentioned only once in Olsen's "Silences," and in a footnote at that, Henry Roth's literary muteness has been formidable, as monumental in its own way as the reputation of his first novel, the legendary "Call It Sleep.
NEWS
December 8, 1987 | ELAINE KENDALL
Shifting Landscape: A Composite, 1925-1987 by Henry Roth, with an introduction by Mario Materassi (Jewish Publication Society: $19.95; 301 pages) This Roth is the writer whose novel, "Call It Sleep," was first published in 1934 and all but forgotten until its re-release in the early '60s, when it was hailed as a neglected masterpiece.
BOOKS
January 10, 1988 | Elena Brunet
One of the most extraordinary, if unheralded, classics of American literature, "Call It Sleep" was first published in 1934. Though hailed by contemporary critics, the novel virtually disappeared until 1956 when Leslie Fiedler and Alfred Kazin individually wrote passionate appraisals of it for a symposium on "the most neglected books of the past 25 years" in American Scholar.
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