Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHenry Sakaida
IN THE NEWS

Henry Sakaida

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
April 14, 1996
Lawyers don't sue people; people sue people! HENRY SAKAIDA Rosemead
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2012 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
After 31 years, military historian and researcher Henry Sakaida has finally closed his most perplexing wartime investigation. Sakaida is a retired Temple City nursery owner whose hobby is studying World War II air combat incidents and then tracking down dogfight participants in hope of turning old enemies into friends. He's back home after taking three sisters, including one from North Hollywood, to a remote South Pacific island jungle where their uncle disappeared in late 1944 after bailing out of his Marine Corps Corsair fighter.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 8, 1987
Debbie Reynolds as a New York City cop in "Sadie and Son"?!!! What a dumb idea! And to think someone was paid to write, direct and produce it! Henry Sakaida, Temple City
OPINION
February 7, 2007
Re "An Iraq war all his own," Column One, Feb. 5 Do we remember after World War II and during the Nuremburg trials, the many discussions and legal rulings regarding personal morality? How the excuses made by those who were forced to perform hideous and inhuman acts in order to save their own lives were considered invalid? And again after Vietnam, when details of unspeakable crimes were revealed, the discussions that followed all agreed that no person should have to obey commands that are obviously immoral, illegal or against his deeply held beliefs.
NEWS
February 2, 1992
CBS' new series "Tequila & Bonetti" is awful. No, wait, I take that back. It's a lot worse. Does someone actually get paid to write, direct and produce this program? Henry Sakaida, Temple City
NEWS
December 24, 1989
"The Wonder Years" is so painfully realistic that I'm certain its writers were once junior high school students! I've been out of junior high school for 23 years now, but with each new episode, I feel myself reliving those awkward, frustrating years. The show is terrific, but let's tone down the realism. I get enough stress watching "thirtysomething." Henry Sakaida, Temple City
NEWS
February 7, 1988
"thirtysomething" is too realistic! At times, while watching a certain situation in the series, my wife would turn to me and give me an understanding smile. And at other times, reminded of our own situation at home, she would glare at me, forcing me to retreat to the kitchen for a convenient snack! Henry Sakaida, Temple City
OPINION
April 8, 2004
The new workers' comp deal (April 3) is flawed because lawyers will still be involved in litigating fraudulent claims on behalf of their "injured" clients through networks of friendly medical specialists. Entire industries have been built on milking the system. Eliminate the lawyers from the system and we will have real reform. Henry Sakaida Temple City
NEWS
August 18, 1991
I'm really sick and tired of the local TV news stations saying "Coming up next," and not keeping their word. When the say "next," I assume that the segment is coming up next, not 20 or 30 minutes later. This shallow ploy really turns viewers off. Henry Sakaida, Temple City
NEWS
September 11, 1988
After nightly doses of sobering TV news, serious and thought-provoking dramas and documentaries, and clean, sappy sitcoms, it's refreshing to put my mind in low gear and watch "Married . . . With Children" and "It's Garry Shandling's Show." I think upstart Fox Channel 11 has something there. The shows may be a bit crude and crass, but at age 36, I think I'm old enough to handle it. Besides, my wife gives me permission. Henry Sakaida, Temple City
OPINION
September 10, 2004
Re "U.S. Toll in Iraq Reaches 1,000," Sept. 8: It is sad to know the death of even one U.S. serviceman in Iraq. But to those who say we do not belong there, I have this to say: The war in Iraq has nothing to do with spreading democracy. We have troops there to protect our economic interests. If our nation was not addicted to oil, we would not be there. As for the young servicemen who die there, they were not drafted. They voluntarily joined, knowing that they might be killed or wounded in the course of their employment.
OPINION
April 8, 2004
The new workers' comp deal (April 3) is flawed because lawyers will still be involved in litigating fraudulent claims on behalf of their "injured" clients through networks of friendly medical specialists. Entire industries have been built on milking the system. Eliminate the lawyers from the system and we will have real reform. Henry Sakaida Temple City
OPINION
December 18, 2001
Re "10 Held as INS Targets Visa Abuses," Dec. 13: Muslim activists complain about the recent roundup of Middle Easterners who have overstayed their visas, claiming that they are being profiled. When they signed the visa application they made a promise to the U.S. government to abide by the terms of the visa. By overstaying, they have broken their promise. Perhaps in other cultures and societies a promise is meaningless, but in American society, promises are expected to be kept. Henry Sakaida Temple City
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2000
Re "The Courts of Ethnic Identity," July 14: I read with disgust of the Community Youth Council's decision to kick a 13-year-old Latino kid off the Montebello Jets Corsairs basketball team because he wasn't of Japanese descent. When I was a kid, my friends and I were all colorblind and race made no difference. Leave it to the adults involved in Japanese American basketball leagues to send a hypocritical message to their impressionable children: It's OK for us to discriminate to preserve cultural identity, but it's not OK for others to discriminate against us!
OPINION
April 14, 1996
Lawyers don't sue people; people sue people! HENRY SAKAIDA Rosemead
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1992
In response to "Splintered Society: U.S. Asians," July 13: I found the article overblown and quite amusing. I am an American of Japanese descent. Whenever people ask me if I am Japanese, Chinese or Korean, I answer: "No, I am an American!" My answer leaves them perplexed and embarrassed as they grope to clarify the question. Am I offended? Of course not! But I know others would be. Racial tension and longstanding enmities are not exclusive of Asian-Americans; take a good look around you. Lack of education and ignorance are partly to blame, but a good portion of it can be attributed to self-appointed ethnic spokespersons.
NEWS
October 14, 1990
With the high rate of crime affecting all of us, my mind can't comprehend the intense drama, sprinkled liberally with singing cops and gangbangers, in "Cop Rock." This has got to be the dumbest TV show that I have ever seen. Steven Bochco--you can forget about singing lawyers and politicians, too. You're getting tired--better take a vacation. Henry Sakaida, Temple City
NEWS
April 9, 1989
Re "Intercultural Etiquette" (by Itabari Njeri, April 2), I am an American of Japanese descent and I have been called an Oriental, Asian-American, Japanese-American and a Sansei (third generation Japanese-American). I have also been asked if I was Japanese, Chinese or Korean and whether I knew judo, karate or could make sukiyaki (yes to all three). Am I offended by these labels and questions? Not in the very least. The term racist is overused, especially by political groups against their opponents in heated campaigns.
NEWS
February 2, 1992
CBS' new series "Tequila & Bonetti" is awful. No, wait, I take that back. It's a lot worse. Does someone actually get paid to write, direct and produce this program? Henry Sakaida, Temple City
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1992
Re the article "Era Passes From the Landscape--Japanese-American Gardeners Are Retiring, Yield Routes to Latinos," Column One, Dec. 21): My father started gardening after World War II because he had no job skills. He dragged his three little boys to work with him. All the while, he kept telling us: "This is the type of work you will be doing if you don't get an education! Study hard and make something of yourself!" The work ethic instilled in us has served me well. Now, I see a lot of Latino gardeners and it warms my heart to see some with their children helping out. I know that their kids will become successful from the lessons they are learning.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|