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Henry Schielein

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NEWS
September 1, 1994 | ANN CONWAY
He's back . After being chief operating officer of the Grand Wailea Resort, Hawaii, for one year, Henry Schielein (former vice president of the Ritz-Carlton hotel in Dana Point) has returned to Orange County to become president of the Balboa Bay Club in Newport Beach. "Hawaii is beautiful, but when you live there, it's like champagne and caviar every day," Schielein said at the waterfront club on Tuesday. "You get tired of it. As beautiful as Maui is, it's the same day after day."
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NEWS
September 1, 1994 | ANN CONWAY
He's back . After being chief operating officer of the Grand Wailea Resort, Hawaii, for one year, Henry Schielein (former vice president of the Ritz-Carlton hotel in Dana Point) has returned to Orange County to become president of the Balboa Bay Club in Newport Beach. "Hawaii is beautiful, but when you live there, it's like champagne and caviar every day," Schielein said at the waterfront club on Tuesday. "You get tired of it. As beautiful as Maui is, it's the same day after day."
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BUSINESS
January 13, 1992 | Chris Woodyard, Times staff writer
Orange County has for years been one of the nation's top vacation destinations. Then in 1991, the Persian Gulf War, recession and cool summer temperatures combined to zap occupancy at the county's major hotels. The luxurious Ritz-Carlton in Dana Point has felt the chill too. General Manager Henry E. Schielein, who joined the Ritz in 1986, has shaved expenses, cut employee hours and taken other steps to try to cope with the downturn.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1992 | Chris Woodyard, Times staff writer
Orange County has for years been one of the nation's top vacation destinations. Then in 1991, the Persian Gulf War, recession and cool summer temperatures combined to zap occupancy at the county's major hotels. The luxurious Ritz-Carlton in Dana Point has felt the chill too. General Manager Henry E. Schielein, who joined the Ritz in 1986, has shaved expenses, cut employee hours and taken other steps to try to cope with the downturn.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1989 | Mary Ann Galante, Times staff writer
Mention luxury in a resort and one of the first names sure to come to mind is the Ritz-Carlton. The five-year-old luxury resort on a bluff overlooking the ocean in Dana Point is Orange County's only winner of two of the travel industry's highest honors: the Mobil Travel Guide Five-Star Award and the Five Diamond Award from the American Automobile Assn.
NEWS
April 17, 1989 | DAVID SHAW, Times Staff Writer
A few years ago, having finished dinner with my sister and her husband in their Denver home, I asked if I might smoke a cigar. "Yes, if you do it outside," my sister said. Outside, it was 16 below. I skipped the cigar. Many cigar-smoking friends have had to make similar decisions in recent years as tolerance for smoking of any kind--and cigar smoking in particular--has all but evaporated from American life, even when the cigar smoker tries to be considerate of others (as some, alas, do not)
BUSINESS
July 10, 1989 | Mary Ann Galante, Times staff writer
Mention luxury in a resort and one of the first names sure to come to mind is the Ritz-Carlton. The five-year-old luxury resort on a bluff overlooking the ocean in Dana Point is Orange County's only winner of two of the travel industry's highest honors: the Mobil Travel Guide Five-Star Award and the Five Diamond Award from the American Automobile Assn.
NEWS
April 17, 1989 | DAVID SHAW, Times Staff Writer
A few years ago, having finished dinner with my sister and her husband in their Denver home, I asked if I might smoke a cigar. "Yes, if you do it outside," my sister said. Outside, it was 16 below. I skipped the cigar. Many cigar-smoking friends have had to make similar decisions in recent years as tolerance for smoking of any kind--and cigar smoking in particular--has all but evaporated from American life, even when the cigar smoker tries to be considerate of others (as some, alas, do not)
NEWS
August 3, 1992 | Nancy Wride
WORK FOR FOOD: The economic slowdown has taken a bite out of the fine dining market (D4), but chefs say there will always be work for the top guns. . . . Celebrity cooks-turned-restaurateurs create an illusion of glamour, although the hours can be grueling 10-hour, six-day workweeks. "You work holidays, weekends, you never see your family," says one chef. But the elite can make $100,000 a year, says Henry Schielein, general manager of the Ritz-Carlton hotel in Dana Point.
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