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Henry Shelton

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July 16, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Army Gen. Henry Shelton, a former field commander in the Persian Gulf War and leader of the secret Special Operations Command, emerged Tuesday as the leading candidate to become chair the Joints Chiefs of Staff, administration officials said. Shelton is the choice of Defense Secretary William S. Cohen to replace Army Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, who is retiring, and is expected to receive President Clinton's blessing within days, officials said.
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NEWS
July 16, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Army Gen. Henry Shelton, a former field commander in the Persian Gulf War and leader of the secret Special Operations Command, emerged Tuesday as the leading candidate to become chair the Joints Chiefs of Staff, administration officials said. Shelton is the choice of Defense Secretary William S. Cohen to replace Army Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, who is retiring, and is expected to receive President Clinton's blessing within days, officials said.
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NEWS
March 27, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Retired Army Gen. Henry H. Shelton, a former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, suffered a spinal injury in a weekend fall at his home in suburban Virginia, military officials said. Shelton, who stepped down as chairman Oct. 1, was listed in serious condition in Walter Reed Army Medical Center, a hospital statement said. Pentagon officials said Shelton, 62, fell off a ladder at his home Saturday.
NEWS
September 17, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Senate unanimously confirmed Army Gen. Henry H. Shelton to become chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Shelton, a 55-year-old Green Beret paratrooper who led U.S. forces in Haiti, replaces Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, who will retire at the end of this month. He will be the third Army general in a row to fill a job that has traditionally rotated among the military services.
NEWS
September 28, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. military chiefs warned Congress that America's defense spending must be quickly increased to replace aging Cold War weapons and bolster a slumping ability to fight and win two major wars at once. "We must find the resources necessary to modernize the force" of the world's only remaining superpower, Army Gen. Henry H. Shelton, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told the Senate Armed Services Committee.
NEWS
April 30, 1999
A roundup of events as NATO airstrikes continue in Yugoslavia: * Bulgaria: NATO warplane inadvertently fires missile into suburb of capital, Sofia. * The Hague: Belgrade accuses 10 NATO states of violating international law. * Washington: Defense secretary orders 10 more B-52 bombers to Balkans. * Belgrade: Jesse Jackson arrives on mission to win freedom for three POWs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2008 | Charlotte Stoudt, Special to The Times
Every American war, Gen. Henry Shelton once observed, must pass the "Dover test": the public's ability to tolerate the sight of slain servicemen and women arriving at Dover Air Force Base in flag-draped caskets. Since 1991, however, the Pentagon has banned press photography at the base, essentially rendering the human cost of the Iraq war -- at least the American side of the tab -- invisible. War casualties as an image problem are the conundrum in "Bury the Dead," Irwin Shaw's righteous, funny and painfully relevant 1936 one-act now playing at the Actors’ Gang.
NEWS
September 15, 2001 | Reuters
The Senate on Friday unanimously confirmed Air Force Gen. Richard B. Myers, an expert on computer and space warfare, to be the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The Senate approved Myers' nomination one day after he was praised by members of the Senate Armed Services Committee as the right man to lead the services into an era of changing threats and technologies. Myers, who had been vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs under retiring Army Gen. Henry H.
NEWS
March 28, 2002 | Associated Press
Retired Army Gen. Henry H. Shelton, a former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is recovering well from a fall but will need spinal cord surgery, Walter Reed Army Medical Center said Wednesday. Shelton "is showing some gradual improvement" and isn't having any problems with his speech or breathing, a hospital statement said. "He is now able to stand with assistance but is still experiencing weakness in his right leg and both arms," the hospital said.
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