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Henry T Mudd

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September 13, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Henry T. Mudd, scion of copper-mining adventurers and co-founder of the college that bears his father's name, has died of the complications of leukemia. A spokeswoman for Harvey Mudd College in Claremont said Wednesday that the retired chairman of the board and chief executive officer of Cyprus Minerals Co. was 77 when he died at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla on Monday. He was the grandson of Col. Seeley W. Mudd, who reopened ancient copper mines on the island of Cyprus.
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NEWS
April 1, 1994 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sex, loads of money, spurned lovers. There's nothing quite like a star-studded palimony case. The term "palimony" was coined in the 1970s when Michelle Triola sued actor Lee Marvin, her former lover, contending that she was promised a share of his earnings in exchange for her wifelike duties over the years they lived together. A judge found there was no agreement to share Marvin's income, but a jury awarded Triola $104,000 to help her get back on her feet. Marvin appealed and won.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Displaying a ring encrusted with sparkling diamonds, Eleanor (Lorraine) Oliver testified Friday that she was a wife in all but name to Henry T. Mudd, even though she willingly shared the reedy multimillionaire with six other mistresses. "He told me I could consider myself his wife and I could consider him my husband," Oliver, 41, said in the first day of testimony in the woman's $5-million palimony suit against Mudd's estate. "I loved Henry and cared for Henry a great deal."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barely 24 hours after a Superior Court jury rejected her $5-million palimony suit against the estate of the late multimillionaire Henry T. Mudd, Eleanor (Lorraine) Oliver was hoping Hollywood will provide the cash the jury withheld. She said she wants to supplement her dwindling savings, which she has lived on since she sued Mudd 2 1/2 years ago, by selling the rights to her life story as one of Mudd's seven mistresses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1992 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At prestigious Harvey Mudd College, the bedroom exploits of the school's late founder are vying with logarithms and the DNA helix as a hot topic of conversation this fall. Students at the top-ranked science and engineering school in Claremont have posted newspaper clippings on their dorm walls--some sent cross-country by parents--recounting the tawdry details of a $5-million palimony lawsuit against the estate of Henry T. Mudd. The suit was brought by Eleanor L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1992
Harvey S. Mudd II testified Tuesday in Superior Court that his father, the late multimillionaire Henry T. Mudd, referred to his many mistresses as "his special friends" and considered them part of his family. Mudd, a 52-year-old Vermont writer, also testified that his father said he shared a marriage-like relationship with Eleanor (Lorraine) Oliver--a former mistress suing Mudd's estate for $5 million in palimony.
NEWS
April 1, 1994 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sex, loads of money, spurned lovers. There's nothing quite like a star-studded palimony case. The term "palimony" was coined in the 1970s when Michelle Triola sued actor Lee Marvin, her former lover, contending that she was promised a share of his earnings in exchange for her wifelike duties over the years they lived together. A judge found there was no agreement to share Marvin's income, but a jury awarded Triola $104,000 to help her get back on her feet. Marvin appealed and won.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court jury Wednesday rejected a palimony suit brought against the estate of the late multimillionaire Henry T. Mudd by one of his seven mistresses, denying the woman who had asked for $5 million a single cent in compensation. Eleanor (Lorraine) Oliver, 41, who saw Mudd for 13 years before she sued him months before his death in 1990, said that she was "obviously very disappointed." "It's been 2 1/2 years of hell," Oliver said, her eyes brimming with tears.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vanessa Mudd, widow of multimillionaire Henry T. Mudd, testified Thursday in Superior Court that she telephoned one of her husband's many mistresses and left a message asking how the mistress could take legal action against her husband when he had been so kind to her. The widow said she protested that her husband cried when he heard of the action. "I also said I hoped she never got a decent night's sleep for as long as she lived," Vanessa Mudd said, her voice breaking with emotion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reacting to a witness's objection, a Superior Court judge denied a camera crew from the television show "Inside Edition" permission to videotape testimony in a $5-million palimony suit Monday because the program is the "expose type." "Inside Edition" is "not considered to be news media," Judge Florence T. Pickard stated in a written order. "This court considers this form of media to be of the expose type."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court jury Wednesday rejected a palimony suit brought against the estate of the late multimillionaire Henry T. Mudd by one of his seven mistresses, denying the woman who asked for $5 million a single cent in compensation. Eleanor (Lorraine) Oliver, 41, who had a 13-year affair with Mudd before suing him months before his death in 1990, said that she was "obviously very disappointed. "It's been 2 1/2 years of hell," Oliver said, her eyes brimming with tears.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court jury Wednesday rejected a palimony suit brought against the estate of the late multimillionaire Henry T. Mudd by one of his seven mistresses, denying the woman who had asked for $5 million a single cent in compensation. Eleanor (Lorraine) Oliver, 41, who saw Mudd for 13 years before she sued him months before his death in 1990, said that she was "obviously very disappointed." "It's been 2 1/2 years of hell," Oliver said, her eyes brimming with tears.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1992 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At prestigious Harvey Mudd College, the bedroom exploits of the school's late founder are vying with logarithms and the DNA helix as a hot topic of conversation this fall. Students at the top-ranked science and engineering school in Claremont have posted newspaper clippings on their dorm walls--some sent cross-country by parents--recounting the tawdry details of a $5-million palimony lawsuit against the estate of Henry T. Mudd. The suit was brought by Eleanor L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A titillating trial closed with a show-biz touch Thursday when an attorney arguing against a woman who wants $4.2 million in palimony from her late lover's fortune unveiled "The Top Ten Reasons Why Lorraine Oliver Should Get Nothing From Henry T. Mudd's Estate." "When I was younger, before this trial started, I used to stay up and watch David Letterman do the Top Ten charts because they were pretty funny," Jamie Broder, an attorney for Mudd's estate, told a Superior Court jury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1992
Harvey S. Mudd II testified Tuesday in Superior Court that his father, the late multimillionaire Henry T. Mudd, referred to his many mistresses as "his special friends" and considered them part of his family. Mudd, a 52-year-old Vermont writer, also testified that his father said he shared a marriage-like relationship with Eleanor (Lorraine) Oliver--a former mistress suing Mudd's estate for $5 million in palimony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harvey S. Mudd II testified Tuesday in Superior Court that his father, late multimillionaire Henry T. Mudd, referred to his many mistresses as "his special friends" and considered them part of his family. Mudd, a 52-year-old Vermont writer, also testified that his father said he shared a marriage-like relationship with Eleanor (Lorraine) Oliver--a former mistress now suing Mudd's estate for $5 million in palimony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vanessa Mudd, widow of multimillionaire Henry T. Mudd, broke down and wept Tuesday in Superior Court as she described her "kind, generous, loving" husband, who she said continued affairs with multiple mistresses even after their marriage. The widow, herself a former mistress who married Mudd eight months before his death in 1990, tearfully told the jury that Mudd, co-founder of Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, was "wonderful, kind, generous, loving, helpful and thoughtful."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court jury Wednesday rejected a palimony suit brought against the estate of the late multimillionaire Henry T. Mudd by one of his seven mistresses, denying the woman who asked for $5 million a single cent in compensation. Eleanor (Lorraine) Oliver, 41, who had a 13-year affair with Mudd before suing him months before his death in 1990, said that she was "obviously very disappointed. "It's been 2 1/2 years of hell," Oliver said, her eyes brimming with tears.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Henry's gone and his women are slinging Mudd at each other in a wild Mudd-wrestle for his fortune!" screamed "Hard Copy." "Multimillionaire businessman Henry Mudd maintained a harem of seven mistresses, one for every day of the week," snickered the Daily Telegraph of London. And reporter Peter McDonald of the London Evening Standard went so far as to compare the tales of wealth and debauchery emerging in Division 38 of Los Angeles Superior Court to the antics of the British Royal Family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vanessa Mudd, widow of multimillionaire Henry T. Mudd, testified Thursday in Superior Court that she telephoned one of her husband's many mistresses and left a message asking how the mistress could take legal action against her husband when he had been so kind to her. The widow said she protested that her husband cried when he heard of the action. "I also said I hoped she never got a decent night's sleep for as long as she lived," Vanessa Mudd said, her voice breaking with emotion.
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