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Henry T Nicholas Iii

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BUSINESS
January 8, 2010 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Federal prosecutors asked a judge Thursday to dismiss narcotics trafficking charges against Henry T. Nicholas III, wiping out the last criminal charges against the co-founder of Irvine chip maker Broadcom Corp. The decision came three weeks after a federal judge dismissed charges that Nicholas, Broadcom co-founder Henry Samueli and the company's former chief financial officer manipulated stock option grants to enrich company employees. U.S. District Judge Cormac J. Carney said prosecutors had intimidated witnesses and made it impossible for the executives to defend themselves.
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BUSINESS
March 25, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
Scott McGregor, the chief executive of chip developer Broadcom Corp., is happy to talk about the expanding list of uses for his company's products - smart cars, for instance - and new innovations that will fuel his company's growth for years to come. Just don't ask which cellphone he carries in his pocket. Broadcom, based in Irvine, designs and sells chips that are used in Apple Inc.'s iPhone as well as in smartphones that use Google Inc.'s Android operating system, the iPhone's chief rival.
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BUSINESS
July 14, 2007 | Kim Christensen and E. Scott Reckard, Times Staff Writers
Riding the high-tech wave of the 1990s, Henry T. Nicholas III became one of the nation's richest people, a brash and innovative billionaire who gave millions to charity and made hundreds of his employees wealthy with stock options. A decade later, the 47-year-old faces a federal investigation and accusations from a former employee that threaten to tarnish his image as one of the tech industry's leading entrepreneurs and one of Orange County's most generous philanthropists.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2011 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
The hits just keep on coming for Irvine's Broadcom Corp. Trouble is, they're not always the kind of hits the company wants. The chip maker on Tuesday is expected to report robust earnings topping $300 million for its fourth quarter, which ended Dec. 31 ? more than five times its profit for the same period last year. That's the good news, and it stems from Broadcom's success is designing chips for for many of the world's bestselling consumer devices: Android phones and Wiis, iPhones and iPads, to name a few. During the last quarter, Apple Inc.'s blockbuster tablet and smart phone sold far more than most analysts expected.
NEWS
November 2, 2008
Ballot measures: An article in Section A on Saturday about billionaires sponsoring state propositions on the Tuesday ballot was accompanied by one wrong photograph. The man identified in the caption as Henry T. Nicholas III, who is backing Propositions 6 and 9, was actually Henry Samueli. Nicholas is pictured here. The Times regrets the error.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
A former Broadcom Corp. executive agreed to pay $1.4 million to settle claims that she participated in a scheme to backdate stock options, the Securities and Exchange Commission said Tuesday. Nancy Tullos, former vice president of human resources at the Irvine-based chip maker, pleaded guilty to one count of obstruction of justice this year in a deal with prosecutors. Tullos is expected to cooperate with prosecutors who are investigating Broadcom co-founders Henry T. Nicholas III and Henry Samueli in the case.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Broadcom's co-founder and former chief executive spent six hours Wednesday inside a federal courthouse in Santa Ana, the same day a grand jury met as part of its ongoing probe into possible allegations of accounting fraud and stock option backdating. Henry T. Nicholas III declined to comment as he left the courthouse in the late afternoon. Federal prosecutors and law enforcement officials also declined to comment. Prosecutors have previously called Nicholas and co-founder Henry Samueli "unindicted potential co-conspirators" in the grand jury investigation.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2009 | E. Scott Reckard
An attempt Friday by Broadcom Corp. co-founder Henry T. Nicholas III to reseal records in the billionaire's divorce case and to bar the Los Angeles Times from publishing information in the documents was turned down by an Orange County judge. The California Court of Appeal ordered the records unsealed last week after a two-year legal effort by Nicholas to keep them private. The Times, which initiated the court action to unseal the documents, argued successfully that the public had a constitutional right to access.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2009 | E. Scott Reckard and Stuart Pfeifer
Newly released documents in the divorce proceedings of Broadcom Corp. co-founder Henry T. Nicholas III reveal harsh battles with his former wife, Stacey, over how to divide the couple's $1 billion in community property, his alleged drug use and her relationship with the family's former security chief. The documents show that Stacey Nicholas' recent efforts to force a trial to divide the estate have been complicated by the pending criminal prosecution of Henry Nicholas. Federal indictments have accused Nicholas of distributing illegal drugs to friends and business associates, and of manipulating Broadcom stock options to secretly provide $2.2 billion in benefits to employees of the Irvine microchip company.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2010 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Launched amid titillating allegations of drug abuse, illicit sex and ill-gotten gains, the federal government's prosecution of Broadcom Corp. executives came to a whimpering conclusion Thursday when a judge threw out the remaining charges against company co-founder Henry T. Nicholas III. U.S. District Judge Cormac J. Carney granted prosecutors' request to dismiss drug distribution charges against Nicholas -- six weeks after he dismissed criminal charges...
BUSINESS
July 18, 2010 | Michael Hiltzik
Connoisseurs of salacious gossip about the rich and famous must have found themselves in pig heaven in June 2008, when federal prosecutors went after the billionaire Henry T. Nicholas III . The indictment charging that he was part of a huge stock option manipulation scheme at Broadcom Corp., the Irvine high-tech company he co-founded, was only the beginning. The lagniappe was a second indictment related to his personal lifestyle: allegations of his purchases of illegal drugs and his hiring of prostitutes on a heroic scale, his construction of an underground drug den, his consumption of marijuana in such volume that the pilot flying Nicholas and his entourage aboard a private jet to Las Vegas had to don an oxygen mask.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2010 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
Federal prosecutors decided Friday not to appeal a judge's recent dismissals of criminal stock options backdating charges against Broadcom Corp. co-founders Henry Samueli and Henry T. Nicholas III. The decision brought to a close a two-year legal battle between the billionaire executives and the Justice Department. Late Friday, Nicholas released a statement that said, "The decision by the Department of Justice reconfirms my faith in our criminal justice system." In December, U.S. District Judge Cormac J. Carney dismissed the charges against Samueli and Nicholas, accusing prosecutors of a "shameful" campaign to intimidate witnesses and obtain unjustified convictions.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2010 | By Stuart Pfeifer
The Securities and Exchange Commission on Thursday dropped a stock-options backdating lawsuit against four Broadcom Corp. figures, the latest legal victory for the Irvine chip company. SEC attorney Molly M. White said the commission chose not to pursue the litigation against Broadcom co-founders Henry Samueli and Henry T. Nicholas III and two former executives "after careful consideration" of comments that a judge made about the case at a hearing in January. The lawsuit, filed in 2008 in the Santa Ana federal courthouse, had sought civil penalties against the men for failing to disclose that they had backdated stock-option grants.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2010 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Launched amid titillating allegations of drug abuse, illicit sex and ill-gotten gains, the federal government's prosecution of Broadcom Corp. executives came to a whimpering conclusion Thursday when a judge threw out the remaining charges against company co-founder Henry T. Nicholas III. U.S. District Judge Cormac J. Carney granted prosecutors' request to dismiss drug distribution charges against Nicholas -- six weeks after he dismissed criminal charges...
BUSINESS
January 8, 2010 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Federal prosecutors asked a judge Thursday to dismiss narcotics trafficking charges against Henry T. Nicholas III, wiping out the last criminal charges against the co-founder of Irvine chip maker Broadcom Corp. The decision came three weeks after a federal judge dismissed charges that Nicholas, Broadcom co-founder Henry Samueli and the company's former chief financial officer manipulated stock option grants to enrich company employees. U.S. District Judge Cormac J. Carney said prosecutors had intimidated witnesses and made it impossible for the executives to defend themselves.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2009 | E. Scott Reckard
An attempt Friday by Broadcom Corp. co-founder Henry T. Nicholas III to reseal records in the billionaire's divorce case and to bar the Los Angeles Times from publishing information in the documents was turned down by an Orange County judge. The California Court of Appeal ordered the records unsealed last week after a two-year legal effort by Nicholas to keep them private. The Times, which initiated the court action to unseal the documents, argued successfully that the public had a constitutional right to access.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
Scott McGregor, the chief executive of chip developer Broadcom Corp., is happy to talk about the expanding list of uses for his company's products - smart cars, for instance - and new innovations that will fuel his company's growth for years to come. Just don't ask which cellphone he carries in his pocket. Broadcom, based in Irvine, designs and sells chips that are used in Apple Inc.'s iPhone as well as in smartphones that use Google Inc.'s Android operating system, the iPhone's chief rival.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2011 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
The hits just keep on coming for Irvine's Broadcom Corp. Trouble is, they're not always the kind of hits the company wants. The chip maker on Tuesday is expected to report robust earnings topping $300 million for its fourth quarter, which ended Dec. 31 ? more than five times its profit for the same period last year. That's the good news, and it stems from Broadcom's success is designing chips for for many of the world's bestselling consumer devices: Android phones and Wiis, iPhones and iPads, to name a few. During the last quarter, Apple Inc.'s blockbuster tablet and smart phone sold far more than most analysts expected.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2009 | E. Scott Reckard and Stuart Pfeifer
Newly released documents in the divorce proceedings of Broadcom Corp. co-founder Henry T. Nicholas III reveal harsh battles with his former wife, Stacey, over how to divide the couple's $1 billion in community property, his alleged drug use and her relationship with the family's former security chief. The documents show that Stacey Nicholas' recent efforts to force a trial to divide the estate have been complicated by the pending criminal prosecution of Henry Nicholas. Federal indictments have accused Nicholas of distributing illegal drugs to friends and business associates, and of manipulating Broadcom stock options to secretly provide $2.2 billion in benefits to employees of the Irvine microchip company.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2009 | Stuart Pfeifer
A federal judge has postponed the criminal trial of Broadcom Corp. co-founder Henry T. Nicholas III until 2010, a delay the billionaire requested to help him prepare his defense against charges that he secretly manipulated stock options to reward employees. U.S. District Judge Cormac J. Carney scheduled Nicholas' trial for Feb. 9, 2010, in Santa Ana, according to a ruling made public this week.
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