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Henry Viii

NEWS
February 2, 1997
Re "The Marching Order" (Jan. 15): In the sidebar, Henry VIII's sixth wife, Catherine Parr, is listed as a firstborn over a paragraph that reads, "She was the only firstborn and the only one to outlive him. The wives who lost their heads tended to be laterborns and outspoken." Catherine Parr was not the only one of Henry's wives to survive him. Anne of Cleves (wife No. 4, divorced after six months) not only survived Henry, she also outlived Catherine Parr and Henry's son, Edward VI. The two wives who lost their heads did not do so because of their outspokenness.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1996 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A recent joke in this paper's Laugh Lines column supposed that while O.J. Simpson was in England, Queen Elizabeth was trying to fix him up with Princess Di. Of course, problems aren't solved that way in today's royal family, but time was when they were. The most famous instance is the manner in which Henry VIII handled his domestic affairs.
NEWS
July 23, 1995 | GRAHAM HEATHCOTE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
What happened to the bones of St. Thomas a Becket, archbishop of Canterbury, when his shrine in Canterbury Cathedral was destroyed in 1538? No written record of the event has been found. But within a month, Pope Paul III announced that Becket's remains had been burnt and his ashes scattered to the winds by order of King Henry VIII, who imposed the Reformation on his kingdom.
NEWS
December 11, 1992 | ELAINE KENDALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even now, marrying royals is a calculated risk, but at least the odds of surviving the experience have improved considerably during the last four centuries. These days, if matters go badly, you'll lose the perks but keep your head. Although four of the six wives of Henry VIII managed to keep theirs in place, only Anna of Cleves and Catherine Parr seemed to have enjoyed life after Henry.
FOOD
October 15, 1992 | NATHALIE DUPREE, Dupree is the author of several cookbooks
I have long been a "royal watcher," one of those who secretly yearns to know about the doings of royalty, preferably English royalty. But unlike those who favor gossip about Di and Fergie, I own up to an inordinate curiosity about Henry VIII and his many wives. Perhaps it's because I am consumed with love for food, and I think, in my heart of hearts, that Henry VIII loved it as much as I do.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Fergie and Andrew: Behind the Palace Doors" is the latest in a long line of plays, novels, films and TV movies with royal blood. Here are some of the films that have followed the comings and goings of the British monarchy. Those available on video are noted below. Charles Laughton received his only Oscar for his larger-than-life performance as England's notorious Henry VIII in producer Alexander Korda's 1933 "The Private Life of Henry VIII" (Nelson Video).
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | HESTER ABRAMS, REUTERS
He married six times, beheaded two of his wives, argued with the Pope and indulged a vast appetite for sex, food and jousting. That is how generations of schoolchildren have remembered King Henry VIII, the larger-than-life English monarch born in this town on the Thames, now a London suburb, 500 years ago on June 28. Father of Elizabeth I, Mary I and Edward VI, the second king of the Tudor dynasty ruled England from 1509 until his death in 1547.
NEWS
January 3, 1991 | From Reuters
Secret details of King Henry VIII's sex life show he did not live up to his lusty image and never consummated his marriage with fourth wife Anne of Cleves. Documents of clerical records made public today show that although Anne and Henry shared the same bed, their eight-month marriage was never consummated because he found his wife flabby and unattractive. The portly Henry was totally put off by Anne, the fourth of his six wives. He had expected her to be beautiful after seeing her portrait.
OPINION
March 4, 1990 | Bruce McCall, Bruce McCall is a frequent contributor to the New Yorker
What if tabloids had reigned when Cleopatra, Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, Napoleon and Rasputin did--and how would they have conjugated the conjugal antics of yesteryear's society headliners? 1810: Josephine fights back after Napoleonic spokesmen announce that her marriage to Bonaparte is annulled: 36 BC: Mark Antony comes eyeball to eyeball with Cleopatra on a state visit to Egypt and . . . . 1536: Henry VIII's tempestuous relationship with wife Anne Boleyn finally comes to a head . . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1989 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time in nine years, Richard Clark won't take part in UC Irvine's annual Madrigal Dinner. He won't help re-create the 16th-Century Renaissance yule feast--complete with hot wassail and figgy pudding, wandering minstrels, magicians and mimes--that has fed and entertained more than 30,000 guests over the past decade. He won't sing traditional airs or perform a pillow dance for 20th-Century comers to the court of King Henry VIII.
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