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Heparin Drug

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BUSINESS
October 24, 1995 | JACK SEARLES
Biopool International Inc., a Ventura producer of test kits for diagnosing blood disorders, says it has acquired a new technology for the early detection of potential complications in patients receiving heparin, a drug used in treating blood-clot diseases. The complication may occur in as many as 10% of patients who receive the drug. The new technology was developed at the University of Alberta Hospitals in Alberta, Canada.
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NATIONAL
March 15, 2008 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
The investigation into a blood thinner suspected in some 19 U.S. deaths is now focusing on the possibility that raw biological ingredients were contaminated even before they reached a factory in China, manufacturer Baxter Healthcare Corp. said Friday. That raises the prospect that the problem could have occurred somewhere along a supply chain that includes layers of middlemen and originates in pig farms. Heparin, a generic medication, is derived from a substance in the lining of pig intestines.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
An anti-clotting drug appears to sharply reduce the chances that patients suffering from severe chest pain will be stricken by heart attacks, Canadian researchers report. Researchers from the University of Montreal found that both aspirin and the long-used drug heparin significantly reduced the chances that those experiencing chest pain would have heart attacks.
BUSINESS
October 24, 1995 | JACK SEARLES
Biopool International Inc., a Ventura producer of test kits for diagnosing blood disorders, says it has acquired a new technology for the early detection of potential complications in patients receiving heparin, a drug used in treating blood-clot diseases. The complication may occur in as many as 10% of patients who receive the drug. The new technology was developed at the University of Alberta Hospitals in Alberta, Canada.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1990 | Compiled from Times Wire and Staff Reports
A spongelike plastic device implanted under the skin near arteries may help to prevent hardening of the arteries, researchers from the Harvard Medical School said last week at the ACS meeting. The implant acts something like a sponge, Dr. Elazer Edelman said, allowing the blood-thinning drug heparin to diffuse through tiny, porelike holes over a period of weeks or months.
NATIONAL
March 15, 2008 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
The investigation into a blood thinner suspected in some 19 U.S. deaths is now focusing on the possibility that raw biological ingredients were contaminated even before they reached a factory in China, manufacturer Baxter Healthcare Corp. said Friday. That raises the prospect that the problem could have occurred somewhere along a supply chain that includes layers of middlemen and originates in pig farms. Heparin, a generic medication, is derived from a substance in the lining of pig intestines.
NEWS
October 18, 1994 | From Associated Press
Slightly increasing the dose of a drug commonly used to treat heart attacks almost doubles patients' risk of devastating strokes, two studies published Monday said. The findings on the drug heparin caused researchers to suspend the studies in April, and in Monday's edition of the journal Circulation they warned doctors to be careful. "We didn't know there was a dark side to heparin," study co-author Dr. Eric Topol of the Cleveland Clinic said. "We learned it has a very narrow window for safety."
BUSINESS
March 10, 1990 | LINDA WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Analysts say Genentech Inc. has done a masterful job of building brand loyalty among doctors for its most important product, the heart attack drug TPA. But because of an Italian study showing TPA--at $2,200 a dose--to be no more effective than a rival drug costing less than one-tenth as much, doctors may be hard pressed to justify TPA to cost-conscious hospitals. A University of Michigan professor of medicine, Dr.
NATIONAL
September 21, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The grandmother of a third premature infant who died after being accidentally given an adult-size dose of blood-thinning medication at a hospital said Wednesday that she prayed other families would not go through what she had because it was hard "to sit there and watch my granddaughter die." The baby girl, Thursday Dawn Jeffers, died late Tuesday at Riley Hospital for Children five days after she was born at Methodist Hospital.
NEWS
October 18, 1994 | From Associated Press
Slightly increasing the dose of a drug commonly used to treat heart attacks almost doubles patients' risk of devastating strokes, two studies published Monday said. The findings on the drug heparin caused researchers to suspend the studies in April, and in Monday's edition of the journal Circulation they warned doctors to be careful. "We didn't know there was a dark side to heparin," study co-author Dr. Eric Topol of the Cleveland Clinic said. "We learned it has a very narrow window for safety."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1990 | Compiled from Times Wire and Staff Reports
A spongelike plastic device implanted under the skin near arteries may help to prevent hardening of the arteries, researchers from the Harvard Medical School said last week at the ACS meeting. The implant acts something like a sponge, Dr. Elazer Edelman said, allowing the blood-thinning drug heparin to diffuse through tiny, porelike holes over a period of weeks or months.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1990 | LINDA WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Analysts say Genentech Inc. has done a masterful job of building brand loyalty among doctors for its most important product, the heart attack drug TPA. But because of an Italian study showing TPA--at $2,200 a dose--to be no more effective than a rival drug costing less than one-tenth as much, doctors may be hard pressed to justify TPA to cost-conscious hospitals. A University of Michigan professor of medicine, Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
An anti-clotting drug appears to sharply reduce the chances that patients suffering from severe chest pain will be stricken by heart attacks, Canadian researchers report. Researchers from the University of Montreal found that both aspirin and the long-used drug heparin significantly reduced the chances that those experiencing chest pain would have heart attacks.
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