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Hepatitis B

SPORTS
June 6, 1998 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What a great sport boxing could be if it weren't for those darn blood tests. Tonight's title fight between heavyweight champion Evander Holyfield and challenger Henry Akinwande at Madison Square Garden was postponed Friday when results of medical tests taken Tuesday showed that Akinwande is in the acute stage of hepatitis B, an infectious but treatable disease. The possibility of this fight being rescheduled will depend on how advanced the disease is. Dr.
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BUSINESS
April 7, 1998 | From Reuters
Shares of Gilead Sciences Inc. shot up nearly 20% Monday after the company released encouraging data about its drug to treat hepatitis B. Gilead jumped $7.13 to close at $43.25 on Nasdaq. The Foster City, Calif.-based company also released strong data from clinical trials of Preveon, a related drug for treating HIV-infected patients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
The risk of liver cancer has fallen by half among children in Taiwan since hepatitis B vaccinations became routine a decade ago. Liver cancer is a major killer, especially in much of the developing world, and the hepatitis B virus is thought to be a major culprit. Taiwan began a program of vaccinating newborns against the virus in 1984--a program that has been adopted in the United States--and expanded it to schoolchildren in the late 1980s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
An experimental new vaccine is showing promise against malaria, which claims 2.7 million lives annually and has proved to be an exceptionally difficult target for vaccines. Scientists from SmithKline Beecham Biologicals have created a new vaccine that combines proteins from the parasite that causes malaria and from the hepatitis B virus. If it works, it will protect against both diseases. Dr. Jose A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1996 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Beginning in July 1991, at least 19 people who underwent surgery at the UCLA Medical Center and a university-affiliated hospital contracted hepatitis B virus infection from a particular a surgeon, according to a federal investigation of the unusual outbreak released today. The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, does not say definitively how the unnamed surgery resident transmitted his hepatitis B infection to 13% of 144 patients he operated on over a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
A medicine approved last month to treat AIDS also shows promise against hepatitis B. The drug, 3TC, suppresses the hepatitis B virus in people with chronic infections, stopping its damage to the liver, a team from Massachusetts General Hospital reported in the New England Journal of Medicine. About 1 million Americans are thought to be infected with hepatitis B, which, left untreated, can lead to cirrhosis, liver failure and liver cancer in a small portion of victims.
NEWS
March 17, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The deaths of five of 15 participants in a catastrophic 1993 hepatitis B drug study on the experimental drug FIAU were unavoidable, the Institute of Medicine said in a report released Thursday. "An elaborate system is in place to protect patients during clinical trials and serious harm is rare," said Dr. Morton Swartz, chairman of the institute panel that conducted the review. "Findings from previous animal and human tests . . . didn't expose this drug's life-threatening side effects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1994 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tuberculosis, smoking, domestic violence, AIDS--major health and safety issues, to be sure, but not often specifically associated with Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. At the Radisson Plaza Hotel Orange County Airport on Tuesday, experts at the first Pan-Asian Health Conference in Orange County told an audience of about 200 health and social service providers that it is time to bring these threats to the Asian community's well-being "out of the closet" and into the public arena.
NEWS
June 26, 1994 | Associated Press
A quarter of hospitals surveyed last year failed to test pregnant women for hepatitis B, which new mothers can transmit to their infants, according to federal health officials. In a 1993 review of 183 hospitals, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently found that 138, or 75%, routinely screened expectant mothers for the virus either at a prenatal visit or at the time of delivery.
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