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Hepatitis C

BUSINESS
May 23, 2001 | Bloomberg News
ICN Pharmaceutical Inc.'s prize drug ribavirin works better with a new Roche Holding product in treating hepatitis C than it does with its current drug combination to treat the liver disease, according to a university research report released Tuesday. Patients responded to the once-a-week combination of Roche's Pegasys and ribavirin 56% of the time, compared with a response rate of 45% for Rebetron, a Schering-Plough Inc.
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NEWS
May 4, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Blood bank agencies announced plans to screen all blood donations for hepatitis C, the most common serious infection spread by blood transfusions. The American Assn. of Blood Banks, the American Red Cross and the Council of Community Blood Centers said in a joint statement issued in Washington that the donated blood will be screened using a new test licensed by the Food and Drug Administration.
HEALTH
September 22, 1997 | DAVID BROWN, THE WASHINGTON POST
In 1972, Vernon Sears was fresh out of the Marine Corps, with time on his hands and a feeling of omnipotence. One day he took up a friend's offer and injected methamphetamine, the drug known as speed. "If I counted on one hand the number of times I tried it, I'd have fingers left over," he said recently. It didn't matter, though, that this period of risky experimentation was brief. In a shot with a borrowed needle, Sears became infected with the hepatitis C virus.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2004 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
Chiron Corp. today plans to announce a change in the licensing policy on its patents covering the genetic makeup of the hepatitis C virus, a move that could lead to the development of new drugs to fight the disease. Scientists at the Emeryville company were the first to identify the virus in 1987, and Chiron has more than 100 patents on the virus' genome -- the molecular code the virus uses to reproduce itself.
NEWS
February 7, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Researchers fear that some new anti-AIDS drugs could exacerbate existing hepatitis C infections or promote new ones. At least one promising new family of anti-AIDS drugs targets a cellular receptor which, when disabled, makes hepatitis C infections much more serious, German researchers said here Tuesday. The drugs mimic a genetic mutation that inhibits the entry of the AIDS virus into human cells, the researchers said.
SCIENCE
April 18, 2003 | From Reuters
New experimental compounds may be able to help the body fight off hepatitis C -- an incurable virus that infects millions around the world and causes liver failure and cancer, researchers said Thursday. The research, done by separate teams in Canada and the United States, also led to discoveries about how hepatitis infects the body -- and how the body fights off infection. Hepatitis C was identified only in 1989.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1999 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many veterans, the cascade of scourges has a biblical quality: Post-traumatic stress disorder. Agent Orange. Birth defects. Gulf War syndrome. Now there is hepatitis C. The chronic liver ailment turns up in ex-service personnel who use VA facilities--especially Vietnam-era vets--at a rate four times the national average, medical experts say.
HEALTH
September 1, 2003 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
Of the millions of Americans infected with hepatitis C, only half respond to treatment. The others live with the constant threat that their health may suddenly, and fatally, deteriorate. A new drug could improve those odds. When used with the antiviral drug interferon, a medication called Zadaxin may help thousands of patients better fight the disease. "This medication looks promising for people who don't respond to other drugs," says Dr.
NEWS
May 14, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The incidence of new hepatitis C infections among intravenous drug abusers has dropped unexpectedly by a dramatic 80% since 1990, according to preliminary results from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Transmission of the virus among drug abusers is thought to account for as much as 85% of the hepatitis C infections discovered each year--a number that totaled 150,000 in 1990.
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