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Hepatitis C

SCIENCE
April 18, 2003 | From Reuters
New experimental compounds may be able to help the body fight off hepatitis C -- an incurable virus that infects millions around the world and causes liver failure and cancer, researchers said Thursday. The research, done by separate teams in Canada and the United States, also led to discoveries about how hepatitis infects the body -- and how the body fights off infection. Hepatitis C was identified only in 1989.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1999 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many veterans, the cascade of scourges has a biblical quality: Post-traumatic stress disorder. Agent Orange. Birth defects. Gulf War syndrome. Now there is hepatitis C. The chronic liver ailment turns up in ex-service personnel who use VA facilities--especially Vietnam-era vets--at a rate four times the national average, medical experts say.
HEALTH
September 1, 2003 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
Of the millions of Americans infected with hepatitis C, only half respond to treatment. The others live with the constant threat that their health may suddenly, and fatally, deteriorate. A new drug could improve those odds. When used with the antiviral drug interferon, a medication called Zadaxin may help thousands of patients better fight the disease. "This medication looks promising for people who don't respond to other drugs," says Dr.
NEWS
May 14, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The incidence of new hepatitis C infections among intravenous drug abusers has dropped unexpectedly by a dramatic 80% since 1990, according to preliminary results from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Transmission of the virus among drug abusers is thought to account for as much as 85% of the hepatitis C infections discovered each year--a number that totaled 150,000 in 1990.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Schering-Plough Corp. said Tuesday it is seeking U.S. regulatory approval to sell its combination hepatitis C therapy to a wider group of patients, including those who haven't been treated already with standard hepatitis-fighting drugs. The news follows an announcement last month that the combination of drugs developed by Schering-Plough and Costa Mesa-based ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc. offers significant benefits to previously untreated patients.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Schering-Plough Corp. and ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc. won regulatory approval Wednesday to sell their combination hepatitis C treatment to a wider group of patients. The Food and Drug Administration approved the combination therapy known as Rebetron for use in patients who haven't been treated already with standard hepatitis-fighting drugs. The wider use should boost sales for Schering-Plough, the eighth biggest U.S. drug maker, and Costa Mesa-based ICN, Eastern Europe's largest drug maker.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc.'s ribavirin drug, used in combination with a Schering-Plough Corp. drug to treat hepatitis C, may face generic competition within a year if an unidentified company wins Food and Drug Administration approval for its version. The FDA's Web site said the agency has received a request from a company to sell a generic version of ribavirin, which is sold by Schering-Plough with its own hepatitis C drugs Intron A and Peg-Intron.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Schering-Plough Corp. and ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc. won Food and Drug Administration approval Wednesday to sell their combination treatment for hepatitis C patients who suffer a relapse. The combination includes Intron-A, which Schering-Plough already sells alone to treat hepatitis, and ICN's drug ribavirin, or Rebetol. Studies have shown the two drugs together provide a significant benefit to patients.
NEWS
October 2, 2001 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Nearly all people infected with the serious liver-damaging hepatitis C virus can vanquish it if they are treated soon after becoming infected, scientists reported Monday. The key: aggressively treating patients with a virus-fighting drug--interferon--in the first few months of infection. Under current therapies, only about 50% of so-called chronic cases of hepatitis C can be cured. The disease, which affects an estimated 2.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Schering-Plough Corp.'s experimental hepatitis drug, Peg-Intron, is more effective than the standard treatment for chronic hepatitis C when the drug is combined with ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc.'s ribavirin, a study said. Combining Peg-Intron with ribavirin reduced the virus to undetectable levels in 54% of patients, according to the study presented Tuesday.
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