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Herb Schmertz

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
Mobil Corp. executive Herb Schmertz says he will soon form his own company. It will "represent corporations and foreign governments and produce television programs and theatrical movies." He also will continue his syndicated newspaper column and his unpaid consultation work for Sen. Robert Dole (R-Kan.) on his bid for the GOP presidential nomination (although those services may not be required much longer).
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
Mobil Corp. executive Herb Schmertz says he will soon form his own company. It will "represent corporations and foreign governments and produce television programs and theatrical movies." He also will continue his syndicated newspaper column and his unpaid consultation work for Sen. Robert Dole (R-Kan.) on his bid for the GOP presidential nomination (although those services may not be required much longer).
BOOKS
May 18, 1986 | David Shaw, Shaw writes about the media for The Times. His most recent book is "Press Watch" (Macmillan)
"Fighting Back" and "Good-bye to the Low Profile." The titles of these two books--both by executives of Mobil Oil--are virtually interchangeable. The books themselves are not. Although both are relentlessly (and not surprisingly) self-serving, Herb Schmertz's book also manages to be provocative, amusing and insightful. William P. Tavoulareas' book is a diatribe, an angry, one-sided account of his libel suit against the Washington Post.
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | DAVID SHAW
When a client comes to John Scanlon's New York office wondering how to put a favorable "spin" on media coverage of a cause or company, Scanlon often starts with a simple exercise. "I always try to write the reporter's lead," Scanlon says. "I actually sit down and . . . try to write the first two or three (para)graphs, and then I . . . try to convince . . . (the reporter) that, in fact, that is the story." How often does the "lead"--or that basic spin--actually show up in print?
BUSINESS
August 13, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Big Oil is going on a public relations counteroffensive. Amid continuing charges of profiteering with the immediate run-up of gas prices following Iraq's invasion of Kuwait nearly two weeks ago, U.S. oil companies are responding with highly publicized price freezes at the pump, full-page newspaper advertisements, lengthy position papers and, even, a radio talk show appearance. At 9 a.m. today, Chevron Chairman and Chief Executive Kenneth T.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Iraq's invasion of Kuwait should really help the cleanup efforts in Alaska," wise-cracked comedian Jay Leno. "Exxon will be up there now squeezing the oil out of every one of those rocks." You probably haven't heard that zinger yet. Leno wrote it late Tuesday and said he plans to tell it during his "Tonight Show" monologue tonight. Surely the disparaging way Leno jokes about the oil industry is much the way the public at large feels.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1987 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
So much for a left-wing bias in public TV. The 53 conservative congressmen who last year signed a letter demanding a "content analysis" of PBS programming apparently didn't know about a right-tilted documentary titled "The Conservatives." It airs tonight at 8 on Channels 50 and 24 and at 9 on Channels 28 and 15. They also apparently didn't know about "Hollywood's Favorite Heavy: Businessmen on Prime-Time TV," a PBS documentary scheduled for March.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1986 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Direct from Moscow, it's American TV's latest smash hit: "The Posby Show." It stars Vladimir Posner. The face is open, earnest. The speech is perfect idiomatic American English, with a hint of Brooklyn. The message is Soviet. Posner, 52, the Kremlin's main man when it comes to explaining and defending his government for the American media, has returned to the United States on a PR mission, temporarily back in the country he and his parents left when he was 15.
BOOKS
May 18, 1986 | David Shaw, Shaw writes about the media for The Times. His most recent book is "Press Watch" (Macmillan)
"Fighting Back" and "Good-bye to the Low Profile." The titles of these two books--both by executives of Mobil Oil--are virtually interchangeable. The books themselves are not. Although both are relentlessly (and not surprisingly) self-serving, Herb Schmertz's book also manages to be provocative, amusing and insightful. William P. Tavoulareas' book is a diatribe, an angry, one-sided account of his libel suit against the Washington Post.
NEWS
May 3, 1987 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
Break out the bacon. Butter up the brioches. It's the Battle of the Hotel Breakfasts. OK, so maybe there are no out-and-out fisticuffs between the two dining rooms. But danger is in the air. Warns Beverly Hills Hotel breakfast manager Bernice Philbin, who has presided at the Polo Lounge for 35 years: "I'm always threatening to go to breakfast at the Bel-Air just to see who's disloyal to me." But her counterpart at the Hotel Bel-Air, David Pinkham, hopes she doesn't.
SPORTS
March 2, 1985 | Randy Harvey
When a track and field athlete sets a world record, it's noted and then, more often than not, forgotten by all but the sport's most faithful followers. But when track athletes make public a feud, it's a gift to the sport's promoters that keeps on giving. Ruth Wysocki's entry in the 2,000-meter run at the Sunkist Invitational in January was of some interest because it was her first race against Mary Decker Slaney since beating Slaney at 1,500 meters in the Olympic trials.
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