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Herbert A Simon

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1992
Nobel Prize winner Herbert A. Simon (economics, 1978) spoke on "Creativity in the Sciences and the Arts" on Tuesday at Claremont McKenna College. Simon is the Richard King Mellon University Professor of Computer Science and Psychology at Carnegie Mellon University. From Simon's address: Examining the Creative Capacity of Computers "Put a computer in the same starting point as some scientist was in, give it the same knowledge that that scientist had . . .
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Herbert A. Simon, who won the 1978 Nobel Prize in economics for pioneering work on the nature of decision making, has died. Simon, a longtime faculty member at Carnegie Mellon University and a leader in the field of artificial intelligence, died Friday at Presbyterian University Hospital in Pittsburgh of complications from surgery last month. He was 84.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Herbert A. Simon, who won the 1978 Nobel Prize in economics for pioneering work on the nature of decision making, has died. Simon, a longtime faculty member at Carnegie Mellon University and a leader in the field of artificial intelligence, died Friday at Presbyterian University Hospital in Pittsburgh of complications from surgery last month. He was 84.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1992
Nobel Prize winner Herbert A. Simon (economics, 1978) spoke on "Creativity in the Sciences and the Arts" on Tuesday at Claremont McKenna College. Simon is the Richard King Mellon University Professor of Computer Science and Psychology at Carnegie Mellon University. From Simon's address: Examining the Creative Capacity of Computers "Put a computer in the same starting point as some scientist was in, give it the same knowledge that that scientist had . . .
BUSINESS
October 16, 1991 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An 81-year-old economist from the University of Chicago, whose Depression-era tour of American factories led him to discover that it costs money to bargain over any transaction, was awarded the Nobel Prize in economics on Tuesday. The theories developed by British-born Ronald Coase, a professor emeritus at the university's law school, were described by the Nobel committee as the economic equivalent of discovering new particles of matter.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three American economists, including a Stanford University professor whose work helped lay the foundation for creation of mutual funds and advanced the understanding of financial markets, were jointly awarded the Nobel memorial prize in economics Tuesday. Professors William F. Sharpe of Stanford, Harry F. Markowitz of City University of New York and Merton H. Miller of the University of Chicago, will share in the $700,000 prize from the Swedish Academy of Sciences.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1992 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1992 Nobel Prize for economics has been awarded to Gary S. Becker, a University of Chicago professor who has used economic theory as a key to explore riddles about families, the work force, crime, discrimination and other social issues, the Swedish Academy of Sciences announced Tuesday. Becker, a professor of economics and sociology whose work was once shunned by the academic Establishment, was awarded the $1.
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