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Herbert Fingarette

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NEWS
April 3, 1988
It is unfortunate that your staff writer emphasized the debate over "safe drinking" rather than the deeper issue addressed by Herbert Fingarette's work, that of personal responsibility versus victimization. We are fast becoming a society of powerless automatons determined by blind forces of heredity, biochemistry, and disease. People who are conditioned to believe they have no choice eventually stop making the effort to choose. The disease theory of behavioral disorders is a 20th-Century version of "The devil made me do it."
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NEWS
April 8, 1988
I'm not surprised that Herbert Fingarette, the subject of the article "Alcoholism: Is It Really a Disease?" (by Beverly Beyette, March 23) is "controversial." His credentials for taking on the medical profession and for involving himself with a behavioral complex like "heavy drinking" aren't imposing, and what is quoted of his argument is not persuasive; but I guess he wanted to stick a "little finger" in the pie. If he wished only to question the practice of calling alcoholism (a vague concept)
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NEWS
April 8, 1988
I'm not surprised that Herbert Fingarette, the subject of the article "Alcoholism: Is It Really a Disease?" (by Beverly Beyette, March 23) is "controversial." His credentials for taking on the medical profession and for involving himself with a behavioral complex like "heavy drinking" aren't imposing, and what is quoted of his argument is not persuasive; but I guess he wanted to stick a "little finger" in the pie. If he wished only to question the practice of calling alcoholism (a vague concept)
NEWS
April 3, 1988
I am the busy mother of three children and I really don't have time to be writing letters to the editor. However, in this case I'm making an exception because I can't stand it ("Alcoholism: Is It Really a Disease?" by Beverly Beyette, March 23). Herbert Fingarette is a disgrace to his profession and should be run out of town on a rail. I wonder what this "mild-mannered philosophy professor" hopes to accomplish by telling anyone that "chronic heavy drinkers" can "often" modify their behavior and take only a few drinks.
NEWS
March 23, 1988 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, Times Staff Writer
Herbert Fingarette, a mild-mannered professor of philosophy at UC Santa Barbara, has helped uncork a controversy of considerable proportions with his book, "Heavy Drinking: The Myth of Alcoholism as a Disease." In it, he challenges the long-accepted theory that alcoholism is a disease, states that chronic heavy drinkers can often return safely to moderate drinking--and stops just short of charging that alcoholism treatment providers are guilty of a money-grasping conspiracy.
FOOD
November 16, 1989 | DAN BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In two days, on Saturday, the federal government's mandatory warning label will begin appearing on bottles of wine, beer and distilled spirits. Ordered by Congress last fall, the warning will state: "Government Warning. (1) According to the Surgeon General, women should not drink alcoholic beverages during pregnancy because of the risk of birth defects. (2) Consumption of alcoholic beverages impairs your ability to drive a car or operate machinery and may cause health problems."
MAGAZINE
January 2, 1994 | COLEMAN ANDREWS, Colman Andrews is editor of Traveling in Style, The Times' travel magazine, and author of "Catalan Cuisine" (Atheneum/Collier Books) and "Everything on the Table: Plain Talk About Food and Wine" (Bantam).
I'm drunk. My cheeks are flushed. My heart is beating fast. I'm not sure what time it is. As I look around the room, I find myself transfixed by insignificancies--a beam of light etching a tiny rainbow onto one side of an Evian bottle protruding from an ice bucket; a thin, translucent rim of molten wax ringing the flame of the milk-white taper on my table; a scribble of blue thread on the back of a waiter's short black jacket.
NEWS
March 23, 1988 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, Times Staff Writer
Herbert Fingarette, a mild-mannered professor of philosophy at UC Santa Barbara, has helped uncork a controversy of considerable proportions with his book, "Heavy Drinking: The Myth of Alcoholism as a Disease." In it, he challenges the long-accepted theory that alcoholism is a disease, states that chronic heavy drinkers can often return safely to moderate drinking--and stops just short of charging that alcoholism treatment providers are guilty of a money-grasping conspiracy.
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