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Herbert Kohl

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NEWS
July 19, 1987 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
When Herbert Kohl wrote "36 Children," a book that helped shape the alternative education movement of the 1960s, he was a young teacher struggling with fifth-graders in the heart of Harlem. It was a heady time. Kohl and a few other philosophers proposed a massive liberalization of the public education system. "Free" schools and "open" classrooms--part of a revolution in instruction that gave even first-graders a say in how they should be taught--soon followed.
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BOOKS
August 26, 2007 | David L. Ulin
A couple of years ago, as he approached his 70th birthday, Herbert Kohl decided he needed to do something for himself. The longtime educator and author was struggling to come to terms with aging, as well as with his grief at the collapse after four years of the University of San Francisco's Center for Teaching Excellence and Social Justice, a program he founded that had "ended bitterly," cut by the university after the funds Kohl had raised ran out.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2004 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
"Teaching in California has become a stupid job, one in which both common sense and pedagogy are replaced by state mandates and politicians' programs," reports Herbert Kohl in "Stupidity and Tears," his collection of no-nonsense essays on public education and the need for reform. Reflecting the author's 40 years in the classroom and his extensive writing about educational problems ("36 Children," "Should We Burn Babar?"
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | from Associated Press
Milwaukee Bucks basketball team owner Herbert Kohl defeated former Wisconsin Gov. Anthony S. Earl in a Democratic primary Tuesday for the seat of retiring Sen. William Proxmire. State Sen. Susan Engeleiter won the Republican race. With 84% of precincts reporting, Kohl had 217,568 votes, or 46%, and Earl had 179,603 votes, or 38%. In other results of primary voting in six states, Vermont's moderate Republican Rep.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2000 | GAIL DAVIS and ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Kohl's Corp., a Wisconsin-based chain of moderately priced department stores that garners praise from both Wall Street and shoppers, is quietly scouting dozens of California locations. Company executives declined to comment on expansion plans for the 350-store chain, adding that Kohl's has made no specific announcements about California. At this point, the chain's westernmost store is in Denver.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2001 | DARYL STRICKLAND and ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Kohl's Corp., signaling an anticipated entry into the lucrative Southern California market, has bought 5 1/2 acres in south Orange County to build its first department store in the state. The Wisconsin retailer is expected to build a 93,000-square-foot store in a 16-acre Rancho Santa Margarita center, according to its co-developer, Regency Centers Corp. in Jacksonville, Fla. The price and other financial terms were not disclosed.
NEWS
July 29, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER and WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton's economic plan ran into trouble in the Senate Wednesday as two more Democratic lawmakers who voted for an earlier version of the budget bill indicated that they may vote against the final product being crafted by Senate-House negotiators. Sens. Bob Kerrey of Nebraska and Herbert Kohl of Wisconsin expressed deep reservations about the package. Their comments came one day after Sen. David L. Boren (D-Okla.), who also voted for the original version, voiced strong opposition.
SPORTS
November 8, 2000 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Voters in Arizona's Maricopa County narrowly approved a measure Tuesday that would provide most of the money for a $331-million stadium for the NFL's Arizona Cardinals. With 98% of the precincts reporting, 51% were in favor of Proposition 302 and 49% against. Joe Yuhas, executive director of Arizona Wins, the group backing the proposal, stopped just short of claiming victory, citing about 40,000 absentee ballots that have yet to be counted. But, he said, "Do the math.
BOOKS
August 26, 2007 | David L. Ulin
A couple of years ago, as he approached his 70th birthday, Herbert Kohl decided he needed to do something for himself. The longtime educator and author was struggling to come to terms with aging, as well as with his grief at the collapse after four years of the University of San Francisco's Center for Teaching Excellence and Social Justice, a program he founded that had "ended bitterly," cut by the university after the funds Kohl had raised ran out.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2001 | DARYL STRICKLAND and ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Kohl's Corp., signaling an anticipated entry into the lucrative Southern California market, has bought 5 1/2 acres in south Orange County to build its first department store in the state. The Wisconsin retailer is expected to build a 93,000-square-foot store in a 16-acre Rancho Santa Margarita center, according to its co-developer, Regency Centers Corp. in Jacksonville, Fla. The price and other financial terms were not disclosed.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2000 | GAIL DAVIS and ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Kohl's Corp., a Wisconsin-based chain of moderately priced department stores that garners praise from both Wall Street and shoppers, is quietly scouting dozens of California locations. Company executives declined to comment on expansion plans for the 350-store chain, adding that Kohl's has made no specific announcements about California. At this point, the chain's westernmost store is in Denver.
SPORTS
November 8, 2000 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Voters in Arizona's Maricopa County narrowly approved a measure Tuesday that would provide most of the money for a $331-million stadium for the NFL's Arizona Cardinals. With 98% of the precincts reporting, 51% were in favor of Proposition 302 and 49% against. Joe Yuhas, executive director of Arizona Wins, the group backing the proposal, stopped just short of claiming victory, citing about 40,000 absentee ballots that have yet to be counted. But, he said, "Do the math.
NEWS
July 29, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER and WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton's economic plan ran into trouble in the Senate Wednesday as two more Democratic lawmakers who voted for an earlier version of the budget bill indicated that they may vote against the final product being crafted by Senate-House negotiators. Sens. Bob Kerrey of Nebraska and Herbert Kohl of Wisconsin expressed deep reservations about the package. Their comments came one day after Sen. David L. Boren (D-Okla.), who also voted for the original version, voiced strong opposition.
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | from Associated Press
Milwaukee Bucks basketball team owner Herbert Kohl defeated former Wisconsin Gov. Anthony S. Earl in a Democratic primary Tuesday for the seat of retiring Sen. William Proxmire. State Sen. Susan Engeleiter won the Republican race. With 84% of precincts reporting, Kohl had 217,568 votes, or 46%, and Earl had 179,603 votes, or 38%. In other results of primary voting in six states, Vermont's moderate Republican Rep.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2004 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
"Teaching in California has become a stupid job, one in which both common sense and pedagogy are replaced by state mandates and politicians' programs," reports Herbert Kohl in "Stupidity and Tears," his collection of no-nonsense essays on public education and the need for reform. Reflecting the author's 40 years in the classroom and his extensive writing about educational problems ("36 Children," "Should We Burn Babar?"
BOOKS
September 20, 1987 | Lee Dembart, Dembart is a Times editorial writer and book reviewer. and
Writing a first-rate math book that will appeal to non-mathematicians must be one of the toughest jobs around. Such books do not appear often. So it is a pleasure to call your attention to two of them. Eli Maor is a mathematician with one hand firmly in mathematics, the other reaching out to the rest of us. His book, "To Infinity and Beyond," is the broader, more expansive, more scholarly of the two, but it is still very accessible to non-specialists. His approach to his subject--infinity as a mathematical and cultural phenomenon--enables Maor to bridge the gap between mathematics and the world.
BOOKS
September 20, 1987 | Lee Dembart, Dembart is a Times editorial writer and book reviewer. and
Writing a first-rate math book that will appeal to non-mathematicians must be one of the toughest jobs around. Such books do not appear often. So it is a pleasure to call your attention to two of them. Eli Maor is a mathematician with one hand firmly in mathematics, the other reaching out to the rest of us. His book, "To Infinity and Beyond," is the broader, more expansive, more scholarly of the two, but it is still very accessible to non-specialists. His approach to his subject--infinity as a mathematical and cultural phenomenon--enables Maor to bridge the gap between mathematics and the world.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
When Herbert Kohl wrote "36 Children," a book that helped shape the alternative education movement of the 1960s, he was a young teacher struggling with fifth-graders in the heart of Harlem. It was a heady time. Kohl and a few other philosophers proposed a massive liberalization of the public education system. "Free" schools and "open" classrooms--part of a revolution in instruction that gave even first-graders a say in how they should be taught--soon followed.
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