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Herbert Kroemer

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October 11, 2000 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The popular image of UC Santa Barbara is that of a party school, situated steps from the ocean and favored by surfers and beach bums. But a lesser-known reality is emerging: Behind the doors of the physics and chemistry labs, world-renowned scientists are conducting groundbreaking research. The two Nobel prizes awarded to UC Santa Barbara professors Tuesday are likely to bring public prestige to a university whose academic credentials have been recognized within the scientific world for decades.
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NEWS
October 11, 2000 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The popular image of UC Santa Barbara is that of a party school, situated steps from the ocean and favored by surfers and beach bums. But a lesser-known reality is emerging: Behind the doors of the physics and chemistry labs, world-renowned scientists are conducting groundbreaking research. The two Nobel prizes awarded to UC Santa Barbara professors Tuesday are likely to bring public prestige to a university whose academic credentials have been recognized within the scientific world for decades.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2001
Nobel Prize-winning physicist Herbert Kroemer will speak at Cal State Channel Islands about cutting-edge computer technology research. The UC Santa Barbara professor won the Nobel Prize in 2000 for developing laser technology used in CD players and other consumer goods. He will speak at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at 1 University Drive, Camarillo. For information, call (818) 887-0577.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2000
The University of California has been home to 43 Nobel Prize winners. Last week, three UC professors won prizes for chemistry, physics and economics. Here is a list of Nobel laureates. Berkeley *--* Laureate Year Field Ernest O. Lawrence 1939 Physics John H. Northrop 1946 Chemistry Wendell M. Stanley 1946 Chemistry William F. Giauque 1949 Chemistry Edwin M. McMillan 1951 Chemistry Glenn T. Seaborg 1951 Chemistry Emilio G. Segre 1959 Physics Owen Chamberlain* 1959 Physics Donald A.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2002 | From Associated Press
An independent panel that includes a Nobel Prize-winning physicist is examining accusations of scientific misconduct that have called into question the validity of highly publicized experiments at Bell Labs. The five-member panel was formed last week after an outside researcher contacted Lucent Technologies Inc. with information that caused enough concern to warrant external review, a Lucent spokesman said. Bell Labs is the research arm of New Jersey-based Lucent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2000
U.S. scientists won big in this year's Nobel prizes, garnering six of the nine awards recognizing discoveries in natural science. Scientists at UC Santa Barbara led the academic pack, winning prizes in both chemistry and physics. As usual, the fact that most of this year's science prizes went to researchers at well-funded U.S. universities inspired grousing from various groups of scientists who felt shut out.
SCIENCE
October 10, 2005 | Karen Kaplan, Times Staff Writer
The University of Chicago lays claim to an astonishing 78 Nobel laureates -- the most of any institution in the United States and second in the world only to England's University of Cambridge. Renowned physicists Hans Bethe and Werner Heisenberg and economics guru Paul A. Samuelson are all counted among Chicago's Nobel brethren. Wait a minute. Didn't Bethe spend virtually his entire career at Cornell University? Isn't Samuelson considered the heart and soul of MIT economics?
NEWS
October 11, 2000 | USHA LEE McFARLING and ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two scientists at UC Santa Barbara were among six worldwide awarded Nobel prizes in chemistry and physics Tuesday for work that ushered in today's Information Age. Physics professor Alan Heeger won for devising the electrically conducting plastics that could revolutionize computing. And engineering professor Herbert Kroemer received his award for developing the laser technology used in CD players and other consumer goods.
MAGAZINE
December 2, 2001
On the 100th anniversary of the Nobel Prize, the government of Sweden and more than a dozen California educational institutions remind us that a disproportionate number of laureates have ties to the state--ties, it must be admitted, that in some cases seem comparable to an innkeeper's boast that George Washington slept there. So be it. The Golden State is nothing if not inclusive.
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