Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHerbert Von Karajan
IN THE NEWS

Herbert Von Karajan

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1986 | MARC SHULGOLD
When bug bites man, it usually doesn't make the papers. But when that man is revered conductor Herbert von Karajan, it is news-- bad news. Particularly for Peter Gelb of Columbia Artists Management.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2009 | Mark Swed, Music Critic
Fuzjko Hemming gave the first of two piano recitals at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica on Friday night. Her appearance was heavily promoted on Japanese television. Ticket prices were high -- $60 to $100 -- but both the Friday and Sunday concerts sold out. The 74-year-old pianist has sold more than 2 million CDs in Japan over the last decade, but the Fuzjko phenomenon hasn't yet crossed the Pacific with the general public. I'm not so sure that it will. But I could be wrong. Her full name is Ingrid Fuzjko von Georgii-Hemming, and she has a compelling story.
Advertisement
BOOKS
May 18, 1986 | Martin Bernheimer, Bernheimer, Times music critic, first encountered Herbert von Karajan at the Vienna Staatsoper in 1958 and has been watching and listening ever since--with mixed feelings.
There are lots of famous conductors plying their mysterious, if not mystical, trade these days, but the number of genuine superstar conductors probably can be counted on three fingers. Leonard Bernstein is the most glamorous and, in America at least, the best publicized. Georg Solti is the most dramatic and, perhaps, the worst publicized. Then there is Herbert von Karajan--the perfectionist, the intellectual, the technical wizard, the schemer, the crybaby.
MAGAZINE
March 21, 2004 | Leslee Komaiko
My last big vacation was to Austria. In my work going to a concert is a joy, so a busman's holiday is the best type. Salzburg is one of the premier [music] festivals. I gather with my international friends and we go to concerts and operas and have parties. It's a time to touch base. I rent a house in a village called Anif. The house has a view of the Alps and a pool. There's wonderful hiking. These are leisurely hikes in the meadows and foothills, not alpine climbing.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Salzburg Festival opened Thursday for the first time in more than three decades without conductor Herbert von Karajan, who died earlier this month. President Kurt Waldheim opened the five-week festival with a tribute to Karajan, the former Berlin Philharmonic maestro, who died July 16 at age 81. "The man Herbert von Karajan is missing, but his musical work will survive," Waldheim said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1989
Re the Times' Morning Report (June 15) that conductor Herbert Von Karajan threatened to quit: Why does Herbert von Karajan believe that he has been given the divine right to control music? The other "guiding spirits" of Austria's Salzburg Music festival should call Karajan's bluff. Then this very proud man might realize that no musician is above his art. He might even probe deeper to realize that no one particular mortal man can control the more powerful and immortal muse called Music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1986 | Associated Press
Herbert von Karajan, 77, the famed director of the Berlin Philharmonic orchestra, has been flown to the United States for medical treatment, Wolfgang Stresemann, the orchestra's general manager, said Friday. Stresemann declined to give any other details in a telephone interview and would not say where in the United States Von Karajan is. Meanwhile, the Vienna Philharmonic announced the cancellation of the orchestra's two concerts under Von Karajan's baton scheduled for Jan. 11 and 12.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The sudden death of conductor Herbert von Karajan less than two weeks before the start of this year's Salzburg Music Festival--which he dominated for over 25 years--has put the event into a state of confusion. Karajan was to have led a new production of Verdi's "Un Ballo in Maschera," staged by British film director John Schlesinger. Six performances of the opera--the first opens the festival July 27--have been sold out for months.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1986
The Berlin Philharmonic, conducted by Herbert von Karajan, will play concerts in four cities in the United States, including Pasadena, in October. The U.S. tour begins Oct. 15 in Symphony Hall, Boston, with a program of Brahms' Third and First symphonies. In the Metropolitan Opera House in New York Oct. 19, Karajan will lead a program consisting of Mozart's Divertimento in D, K. 334, and the Ninth Symphony by Bruckner. After a 10-year absence, the Berlin ensemble will return to Chicago Oct.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1991 | MICHAEL Z. WISE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The opening days of this summer's Salzburg Festival have followed their habitual stately pattern with little sign that one of Europe's most venerable cultural events stands on the brink of dramatic change. Opera fans take their seats in the cavernous Festival Hall most evenings and applaud the standard fare with repeated delight. After decorous jubilation of the stellar lineup, the pampered audience bolts for late-night suppers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1989
Re: Walter Ratliff's review of "Night and Day, A Cole Porter Album," (Sept. 24): Let's just charitably say that if Cole Porter is a writer of "dated . . . second-rate music and lyrics," then Ratliff is an eternally out-of-date, tenth-rate music critic. STEVE SCHOENBERG Burbank
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Austrian conductor Herbert von Karajan was under investigation by the U.S. Justice Department over allegations of involvement in Nazi persecution, but the case against him was dropped when he died last month, a government lawyer said Wednesday. Among the allegations were that Karajan might have worked for the Nazi security police and had a role in ridding German orchestras of Jews and other "non-Aryans."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1989 | HERBERT GLASS
The recent death of conductor Herbert von Karajan ended a recording career that spanned a full half-century--exceeded in duration only by that of Leopold Stokowski. Quantitatively, Karajan was--and is likely to remain--in a class by himself, having made an estimated 800 recordings, with sales of 150 million copies. He recorded at least a bit of nearly everything including, forgettably, the Baroque staples.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The sudden death of conductor Herbert von Karajan less than two weeks before the start of this year's Salzburg Music Festival--which he dominated for over 25 years--has put the event into a state of confusion. Karajan was to have led a new production of Verdi's "Un Ballo in Maschera," staged by British film director John Schlesinger. Six performances of the opera--the first opens the festival July 27--have been sold out for months.
NEWS
July 17, 1989 | MYRNA OLIVER, Times Staff Writer
Herbert von Karajan, controversial icon of the prestigious Berlin Philharmonic, the Salzburg Festival, the Vienna State Opera and world recording studios, died Sunday at his home in Anif, Austria, of apparent heart failure. He was 81. Although ill, Karajan had planned to conduct the opening opera of the Salzburg Festival, Guiseppe Verdi's "Ballo in Maschera," on July 27, and had regularly conducted rehearsals, according to festival president Albert Moser.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|