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August 15, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
We learn in the opening moments of "Herblock: The Black & the White" that when famed Washington Post editorial cartoonist Herbert Block (best known by the signature in the film's title) was young, he drew a chalk caricature of Kaiser Wilhelm on the sidewalk, taking pleasure in the notion that his neighbors would be walking over it. Block never lost the glee that came from creating images that would stir the pot and champion causes close to his heart. Michael Stevens' (son of filmmaker George Stevens Jr.)
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
We learn in the opening moments of "Herblock: The Black & the White" that when famed Washington Post editorial cartoonist Herbert Block (best known by the signature in the film's title) was young, he drew a chalk caricature of Kaiser Wilhelm on the sidewalk, taking pleasure in the notion that his neighbors would be walking over it. Block never lost the glee that came from creating images that would stir the pot and champion causes close to his heart. Michael Stevens' (son of filmmaker George Stevens Jr.)
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OPINION
March 4, 2007 | Jim Morin, Jim Morin draws for the Miami Herald and is the winner of this year's Herblock Prize. He is filling in for Joel Pett, who has the week off.
I learned political cartooning from Herblock. His cartoons were devastating, incisive, unequivocal -- unforgettable. He didn't want to entertain you or make you laugh. It was outrage over perceived injustice, incompetence, hypocrisy or skulduggery that caused him to pick up an ink pen. Ironically, his cartoons' searing honesty and truthfulness made me laugh. Herblock was a marvelous draftsman as well. His caricatures cut to the heart and soul of their subjects, as true caricature should do.
OPINION
February 21, 2010
The journalism world may be in a bit of disarray, but we can still hand out accolades. Matt Wuerker of Politico took the first of this season's cartooning awards, the Herblock Prize, named for the late Washington Post legend. Wuerker, who has freelanced for this paper over the years, credits former Times great Paul Conrad (a formidable contemporary of Herblock, still cranking out cartoons) for encouraging him as a high schooler in Palos Verdes. Local boy makes fun! You can see a complete slide show of his winning cartoons, all from 2009, at Politico.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I'm glad Walter Lippmann can't draw." --Lyndon B. Johnson Tony Auth, editorial cartoonist for the Philadelphia Inquirer, remembers being swept along by the fury and euphoria of the first offensive. "So Far, So Good," bragged the caption on his panel for the next morning. "Then, all of a sudden, Israel is attacked with what they were saying was probably nerve gas," he recalls. "So I yanked that cartoon.
NEWS
February 1, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
The late Herblock, the famous editorial cartoonist for the Washington Post, left $50 million to create a philanthropic foundation--a sum that shocked some of his friends who weren't aware he was that wealthy. Former Post reporter Frank Swoboda was elected president of the Herb Block Foundation, which will focus on educating children, improving Washington communities and encouraging young editorial cartoonists. Herblock died in October at age 91.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Herblock, the Washington Post cartoonist whose witty and frequently ferocious drawings provided some of the most memorable images in the history of American political discourse and earned him the highest honors of his profession and the nation, died Sunday night at Sibley Memorial Hospital. He was 91. He had pneumonia. His career began before the stock market crash of 1929 heralded the Great Depression and lasted into the 21st century. Herbert L.
OPINION
February 21, 2010
The journalism world may be in a bit of disarray, but we can still hand out accolades. Matt Wuerker of Politico took the first of this season's cartooning awards, the Herblock Prize, named for the late Washington Post legend. Wuerker, who has freelanced for this paper over the years, credits former Times great Paul Conrad (a formidable contemporary of Herblock, still cranking out cartoons) for encouraging him as a high schooler in Palos Verdes. Local boy makes fun! You can see a complete slide show of his winning cartoons, all from 2009, at Politico.
BOOKS
November 14, 1993 | Larry Dietz, Dietz is finishing a book on the Chandler family and the development of Los Angeles
Writers have the first and middle, as well as the last, word, so let me say at the outset that I think the most difficult job in newspapering is editorial cartooning. It requires the ability to create, on a daily deadline, a drawing and caption that, at best, absolutely defines its subject. We've been well served by many great American editorial cartoonists: to name just a few, there was Thomas Nast (who worked for a weekly), Dan Fitzpatrick, Bill Mauldin and The Times' own Paul Conrad.
OPINION
March 8, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Pat Bagley of the Salt Lake Tribune bagged the 2009 Herblock Prize for editorial cartoons. Among the very few awards judged by fellow cartoonists (this year, Jules Feiffer, Garry Trudeau and the 2008 winner, John Sherffius), the prize is named for three-time Pulitzer Prize winner and Washington Post legend Herbert Block and funded from his foundation.
OPINION
March 8, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Pat Bagley of the Salt Lake Tribune bagged the 2009 Herblock Prize for editorial cartoons. Among the very few awards judged by fellow cartoonists (this year, Jules Feiffer, Garry Trudeau and the 2008 winner, John Sherffius), the prize is named for three-time Pulitzer Prize winner and Washington Post legend Herbert Block and funded from his foundation.
OPINION
March 4, 2007 | Jim Morin, Jim Morin draws for the Miami Herald and is the winner of this year's Herblock Prize. He is filling in for Joel Pett, who has the week off.
I learned political cartooning from Herblock. His cartoons were devastating, incisive, unequivocal -- unforgettable. He didn't want to entertain you or make you laugh. It was outrage over perceived injustice, incompetence, hypocrisy or skulduggery that caused him to pick up an ink pen. Ironically, his cartoons' searing honesty and truthfulness made me laugh. Herblock was a marvelous draftsman as well. His caricatures cut to the heart and soul of their subjects, as true caricature should do.
NEWS
February 1, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
The late Herblock, the famous editorial cartoonist for the Washington Post, left $50 million to create a philanthropic foundation--a sum that shocked some of his friends who weren't aware he was that wealthy. Former Post reporter Frank Swoboda was elected president of the Herb Block Foundation, which will focus on educating children, improving Washington communities and encouraging young editorial cartoonists. Herblock died in October at age 91.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Herblock, the Washington Post cartoonist whose witty and frequently ferocious drawings provided some of the most memorable images in the history of American political discourse and earned him the highest honors of his profession and the nation, died Sunday night at Sibley Memorial Hospital. He was 91. He had pneumonia. His career began before the stock market crash of 1929 heralded the Great Depression and lasted into the 21st century. Herbert L.
BOOKS
November 14, 1993 | Larry Dietz, Dietz is finishing a book on the Chandler family and the development of Los Angeles
Writers have the first and middle, as well as the last, word, so let me say at the outset that I think the most difficult job in newspapering is editorial cartooning. It requires the ability to create, on a daily deadline, a drawing and caption that, at best, absolutely defines its subject. We've been well served by many great American editorial cartoonists: to name just a few, there was Thomas Nast (who worked for a weekly), Dan Fitzpatrick, Bill Mauldin and The Times' own Paul Conrad.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I'm glad Walter Lippmann can't draw." --Lyndon B. Johnson Tony Auth, editorial cartoonist for the Philadelphia Inquirer, remembers being swept along by the fury and euphoria of the first offensive. "So Far, So Good," bragged the caption on his panel for the next morning. "Then, all of a sudden, Israel is attacked with what they were saying was probably nerve gas," he recalls. "So I yanked that cartoon.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2013 | By David Horsey
In one episode of "Seinfeld," hapless George Costanza was hired as a stunt hand for a movie. Predictably, things went awry and poor George's hand never made a cinematic debut. In the days leading up to the 2013 Academy Awards ceremony, my own hand fared far better performing a tiny but stellar role in a documentary about the great Washington Post editorial cartoonist, Herblock. Last week, I got a call out of the blue asking if I had time to be a technical advisor for a film about the man whose pen name was derived from the simple mashing together of his first and last names, Herb Block.
OPINION
March 5, 2006 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Tune out the Oscars. Here are the winners of this week's Toonies: * Least-supported roles in a dark tragedy: Mark Cohen's grim portrayal of the Darfur humanitarian disaster. * Best bad actors in an epic foreign adventure: Mike Keefe's ominous ensemble cast of caricatures. * Best direction taken: Mike Luckovich's excellent metaphorical adventure culminated a week of cartoons on Dubya's Dubai ports deal. * Best picture: Ann Telnaes, schooled as a Disney animator, always gets her lines right.
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